Strengthening our communities through the National Shipbuilding Strategy

Learn how Canadians are benefitting from our work to equip the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard. Follow the progress of shipbuilding projects by watching time-lapse videos.

Infographic: Rebuilding our marine industry and supporting technological innovation

Stories about our work and our communities

Meet Canadians who are experiencing real benefits from our work. Learn about the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and follow the progress of shipbuilding projects.

Watch the National Shipbuilding Strategy video

Learn how the National Shipbuilding Strategy is revitalizing the shipbuilding industry, bringing prosperity and jobs to Canada from coast to coast to coast.

Transcript of the National Shipbuilding Strategy video

Canada is full of talented people from coast to coast to coast (map of Canada shown in the background).
Working hard to grow our economy.
And there is an initiative that is sailing high
Providing economic benefits in communities across Canada.
We call it The National Shipbuilding Strategy.
It is providing the men and women of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard (logo of the Royal Canadian Navy and logo of the Canadian Coast Guard shown in the background)
with the equipment they need to do their job and keep us safe.
It is also revitalizing an industry by building ships at home.
This strategy is bringing prosperity to Canada
by training our future workforce
and reinvesting in our communities and in our people.
It is providing jobs to thousands of Canadians.
The National Shipbuilding
Learn more at: Canada.ca/shipbuilding
/PSPC.SPAC (appears with Facebook’s logo)
@pspc_spac (appears with Twitter’s logo)
/company/pwgsc (appears with LinkedIn’s logo)
Corporate identity of the Government of Canada is shown, followed by the Canada wordmark

Watch a video on the economic benefits of the National Shipbuilding Strategy

Through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, we are strengthening our community by creating and maintaining jobs and by training our workforce. Discover how the strategy helps provide economic opportunities to small and medium-sized enterprises in Canada.

Transcript of the economic benefits of the National Shipbuilding Strategy video

Start of clip.

(Text appears.)

The National Shipbuilding Strategy is strengthening our communities by creating and maintaining 7,350 good paying jobs annually and training our diversified workforce.
650 suppliers from across the country, 500 of which are small to medium-sized enterprises, have been awarded related contracts, resulting in an increase of $7.7 billion in Canada’s gross domestic product.
The National Shipbuilding Strategy is providing economic opportunities for today’s generations and those of the future.
Learn more at
Canada.ca/shipbuilding

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Explore stories from Canadians who benefit from our work

Meet Brian Belanger

He is the lab manager at Thales Canada.

Transcript for the Meet Brian Belanger video

Start of clip.

Brian Belanger, Lab Manager with Thales Canada, is being interviewed in the Thales Office in Ottawa, Ontario.

(Brian Belanger says)

My background is, I graduated from Algonquin College in May 2015.

(The camera shows pictures of the main consoles for the Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels.)

I arrived here at Thales in July 2015, and I’ve been working here ever since. And this is my first job in the field of Electrical engineering technology.

I am the lab manager. I run the entire lab. I make sure all the equipment is wired-up properly, I build cables, build racks and do factory acceptance tests for the customers.

(The camera shows construction at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards.)

The National Shipbuilding Strategy has impacted my career in a great way.

I am learning something new every single day, where I am learning the ins and outs of shipbuilding and the Lloyd’s Register’s rules and the rules of the ocean.

We have just finished our factory acceptance test with a customer and we passed successfully. Now we are packing up the consoles and shipping them out to Vancouver, where they will put on a ship.

The thing I enjoy most about this project is probably the troubleshooting of equipment.

(Camera returns to Brian Belanger.)

There is no better feeling than when you have an end-line product that the customer sees and is satisfied with, it’s a great feeling.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Simon Sukster

He is a deputy project manager at Thales Canada.

Transcript for the Meet Simon Sukster video

Start of clip.

(Simon Sukster, a deputy project manager with Thales Canada, is being interviewed outside at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Simon Sukster says)

I started out in the military. I retired after 35 years in the Air Force as an aerospace engineer, and upon retirement, I followed my wife out to Vancouver.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

Thales offered me the opportunity to get involved with the shipbuilding project, so I, rather than retire, opted to stay in the workforce and work here on site.

(Interviewer asks)

How did National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) impact your life as an engineer?

(The camera returns to Simon Sukster.)

(Simon Sukster answers)

It's quite interesting because as I mentioned, I was an aerospace engineer. Thales does the electronic systems integration aboard the vessels that are being built here in this shipyard. 

(Camera shows Simon Sukster reviewing a document with a colleague.)

And so I, my skills are very transferable. So I said, “Well, it's a great opportunity to do the same thing I've done in an aircraft over many years, but only do it on ships.” 

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

So for me professionally, it's been very rewarding because it has been a great opportunity to learn how ships are built and expand my professional knowledge as it relates to engineering and project management.

Specific examples would be I didn't understand, in fact, that ships—

Aircraft are built kind of like cars in terms of an assembly line. Ships are built like, I think like putting Lego blocks together. They're built in pieces and then they stick the Lego blocks together and they're built very, very differently. 

(Camera returns to Simon Sukster.)

So for me, that was quite a new knowledge set for me to understand actually how the ships are constructed.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Nick Camps

He is an installation engineer at Thales Canada.

Transcript for the Meet Nick Camps video

Start of clip.

(Nick Camps, an installation engineer at Thales Canada, is being interviewed outside at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Nick Camps says)

This project's impacted my life in a couple of ways. Professionally, it's given my career a direction, which it didn't have before. Prior to being hired on as part of National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS), I had just graduated with a general degree in mechanical engineering, but now I know I have work in the marine industry for possibly the next 20 years.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

On the personal side, it's allowed me to move to the west coast, which had been a long-term goal of mine for a number of years.

It's completely different than what I learned in school. A lot of what I learned in school was very technical and theoretical, whereas here it's a lot more hands on and I'm seeing how things are done in industry rather than in theory.

Just seeing the overall build process has been pretty interesting, seeing how they put it together in blocks, kind of like Lego blocks.

(Interviewer asks)

What type of skills did you acquire here?

(Camera returns to Nick Camps.)

(Nick Camps responds)

As an installation engineer, I spend a lot of time in the yard, so I get to observe how the ship is constructed and put together. And that's fantastic experience, which I can then apply back when I do design work back in the office.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Caitlyn Hughes

She is a ship fitter apprentice at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards.

Transcript for the Meet Caitlyn Hughes video

Start of clip.

(Caitlyn Hughes, a ship fitter apprentice, is being interviewed outside at Seaspan's Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Interviewer asks)

What are you doing for Seaspan right now?

(Caitlyn Hughes responds)

Working on that.

(Caitlyn gestures toward the ship under construction and laughs.)

As an apprentice, I get the opportunity to go through all of the shops. So I started out in sub assembly, building small parts. I moved into outfitting, which is attaching all of the pieces that we need to hang wire and pipe.

(Camera shows the shipyard.)

Right now, I'm doing outfitting on a bit of a bigger scale out in [sector] 70, which is block assembly. It's where we put all of our blocks together before they get moved to the main unit.

So I get to do a little bit of everything, which is pretty cool.

(Interviewer asks)

What's your story, Caitlyn? What brought you here?

(Camera returns to Caitlyn Hughes.)

(Caitlyn Hughes responds)

I started out as a youth worker. I got about three quarters of the way through my social work degree, and called it [a day]. It was emotionally draining and I wasn't able to pay my bills, and I looked at retraining and trades is kind of what came up for me.

(Interviewer asks)

And what made you choose this field?

(The camera shows the shipyard.)

(Caitlyn Hughes responds)

My father suggested that I go into fitting. He thought that I would be doing smaller scale stuff. He figured I'd get into, like, prop assembly and building small things. So I chose this shipyard, and the shipyard chose me.

(Caitlyn laughs.)

It's been amazing. It's incredibly life changing. I love showing up for work every day. The people that I work with are incredible.

(Camera returns to Caitlyn Hughes.)

The fitting crew has been nothing but helpful since the start. If I have questions or concerns, they bend over backwards to make me feel comfortable here. So—

(Interviewer asks)

No regrets…

(Caitlyn Hughes responds)

None.

(Interviewer asks)

…for changing career?

(Caitlyn Hughes responds)

None whatsoever. It's been amazing. And I'm only a year and a half in, and this is, this is a lifetime change for me.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

 (The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Faye Xuan

She is a project manager with the Joint Support Ships program.

Transcript for the Meet Faye Xuan video

Start of clip.

(Faye Xuan, a project manager with the Joint Support Ship project, is being interviewed outside at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Faye Xuan says)

I started out as an electrical engineer for the automotive industry. After that, I moved to Vancouver and got my Master of Business Administration (MBA) and continued in the electrical engineering field for the oil and gas material handling industry. 

(The camera shows work at the shipyard.)

And an opportunity came up to work in the marine industry and I grabbed it. 

(Interviewer asks)

What was the experience that brought you here?

(Camera returns to Faye Xuan.)

(Faye Xuan responds)

Actually it’s a bit of a personal story. I was laid off on my daughter's first birthday from my previous job. 

(The camera shows work at the shipyard.)

And the day after, I was contacted by a friend who told me about the opportunity in the growing marine industry in Vancouver. So I took the opportunity, interviewed and got the project manager position.

(Interviewer asks)

How has this opportunity impacted on your career?

(Camera returns to Faye Xuan.)

(Faye Xuan responds)

It had a great impact. First of all, I changed industry. It's a little bit different, going from land engineering to marine engineering.

(The camera shows work at the shipyard.)

They're a different process, they're a different way of engineering certain things. So it has been a big change, but nevertheless very interesting.

(Interviewer asks)

Can you give some specific examples?

(Faye Xuan responds)

Absolutely. It is a complex project. I definitely feel that in project management, I was able to learn a lot in terms of program control, making sure that we're staying on schedule and on budget. Working on government contracts, it’s a little bit different from private sector. There are a lot of checks and balances that need to be in place.

(Camera returns to Faye Xuan.)

So as a project manager, I learned a lot in that respect.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Alexi Sergic

He is a naval architect with the Joint Support Ships program.

Transcript for the Meet Alexi Sergic video

Start of clip.

(Alexi Sergic, a naval architect with the Joint Support Ships project, is being interviewed outside at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Alexi Sergic says)

I graduated from University of British Columbia and I studied mechanical engineering and naval architecture.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

(Alexi Sergic continues)

Being on this project and working for a great organization is pretty much a dream come true for me, to be honest. I've always wanted to be involved in ship design and construction. So I feel blessed to be in this position and to do what I really enjoy and I take a big pride in designing ships for the Royal Canadian Navy.

This has also been a great learning opportunity because a lot of younger professionals like I am, who have been working with very smart and experienced people in this industry, who have over 20 [or] 25 years of experience in marine field.

(The camera shows Alexi Sergic.)

And the great thing about it is that these professionals are always very keen on sharing their knowledge with the younger generation, ensuring that the Canadian shipbuilding industry is in good hands.

(Interviewer asks)

How different is your experience compared to what you learned at university?

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard and moves back to Alexi Sergic.)

(Alexi Sergic responds)

A lot of stuff that you learn in school is more theoretical, and once you get to an office, you actually get a chance to do more drafting and calculations, become more familiar with classification societies and actually I have a chance to learn from experienced people in the industry instead of dealing with professors.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Maureen Trumakent

She is an employee at VARD Marine.

Transcript for the Meet Maureen Trumakent video

Start of clip.

(Maureen Trumakent, an employee at VARD Marine in Vancouver, is being interviewed at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Ltd.)

(Maureen Trumakent says)

I graduated from Ukrainian Marine University a long time ago. I started shipbuilding there and primarily it was theory of ships and vessels. And after my graduation, I started my career in one of the shipyards in Ukraine in Nikolaev (Mykolaiv) with Holland company. They were owners. It was Damen, a very famous company in Europe.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard and images of the west coast.)

(Interviewer asks)

What has been the impact on you and your family to work for VARD Marine?

(Maureen Trumakent responds)

For my family, it was a big impact as we moved to Canada almost one year ago. And, you know, all our lifestyles were changed, especially for our kids. They are so happy to be here and we as well.

You know, Canadian experience of work is a little bit different from European, but it's still interesting. And I found a lot of friends here and I learned a lot of new stuff, you know, different technologies, different style of work. It's good.

In Ukraine, I did almost all the time is production information for the shipyards, and here, I started to do basic design before all these productions. Like, all calculations using all rules and classification societies.

(Interviewer asks)

How different is your experience here than what you learned in university in Ukraine?

(The camera shows Maureen Trumakent.)

(Maureen Trumakent responds)

It's almost the same, but what I learned in university I didn't use in my previous life in Ukraine. But I started to use it here. It's really useful. All my knowledge now I can use it here.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Lauren Miller

She is a first-year apprentice ship fitter.

Transcript for the Meet Lauren Miller video

Start of clip.

(Lauren Miller, a first-year apprentice ship fitter, is being interviewed inside a warehouse)

(Lauren Miller says)

I started out in a kitchen, and I knew that that's not really what I wanted to do at all. So I got hired on at, a fireplace company in which I ended up doing welding and then I discovered how much I really loved welding. And then, I decided to go into school for fabricating after that. So I studied metal fabrication foundations at BCIT.

(The camera shows Lauren Miller working.)

At Seaspan, they have a really awesome way of where you go around to every different shop every three to six months. And so, with that, you get to try all of the different areas of fabricating. The thing I really like about fabricating is there's so many different ways to go with it. So if I wanted to be a burner, I could, once I'm done all my rounds, I could be a burner.

(The camera shows Lauren Miller.)

If I wanted to stay here and do the small stuff, I can do the small stuff. If I go out to SOC 70 and 80, if I really like it, they're doing all the big stuff. So lots of everything just fitting components together.

(Interviewer asks)

How has this opportunity impacted your life?

(Lauren Miller responds)

A lot. I mean, it's given me a well-balanced life. Really good benefits, they have really good pay here.

(The camera shows Lauren Miller working and construction at the shipyard.)

It's helped me realize how much more there is to here, and it's given me a steady job.

(The camera shows Lauren Miller.)

A big part of me really wants to be one of those people that is kind of on the tools and the trade for four years, but my general idea, what I'd like to do is get a really good idea of every kind of part of fitting I can really do, and fabricating, and then hopefully move up into management and then maybe one day become the steel supervisor.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Kimberly Webster

She is a student seeking a career in shipbuilding.

Transcript for the Meet Kimberly Webster video

Start of clip.

(Kimberly Webster, a B-level welder, is being interviewed from her classroom.)

(Kimberly Webster says)

In the past, I have my ticket for power line pool inspection for BC Hydro, and then I went on to, to my personal training ticket. And then, I came here to the United Association (UA) school and I got my C level, or level 1 and 2 foundations at the end of 2015.

(Camera shows images of the Ideal Welders Ltd. yard and the classroom.)

And then I went on to work at Ideal Welders and the Tilbury liquefied natural gas (LNG) Plant up until a month ago when I started my Level 3, or B-level—we’re in transition—program. And I'm about a month into my B level right now.

(Interviewer asks)

How has this opportunity impacted your life?

(The camera shows Kimberly Webster.)

(Kimberly Webster responds)

I guess I didn't really know where I was going to be or what I was going to do. Lots of my friends were going to university. I'd done various jobs and hadn't really thought about buying a house or what I was going to do with my life. And then when I started in the trades, all the opportunities sort of opened up, possibly going to work out of town.

(The camera shows images of classroom and students leaving the Piping Industry College of British Columbia.)

I met lots of friends that have opened lots of doors for me, and now I'm thinking about buying a house and doing a lot more things with my life.

(The camera shows Kimberly Webster.)

I'd like to hopefully go work at the docks in North Vancouver, possibly for Seaspan, maybe even on Vancouver Island, wherever the opportunities might be when I'm finished my level here. And then I guess I'd like to get into the piping side of it, I imagine to get some experience.

(The camera shows images of a person welding.)

I'll maybe be on the ship side doing panels when I start, but then hopefully moving into the piping side eventually.

(Interviewer asks)

Did you really think that you'd end up in a career like this?

(The camera shows Kimberly Webster.)

(Kimberly Webster responds)

No, definitely not. When I was in high school, my parents used to say to me that I should think about the trades and I was always like, you know, I'm a girl, I'm not going to go into the trades. But I love it, and it's definitely the best decision I ever made.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Daniel Lair

He is a student seeking a career in welding.

Transcript for the Meet Daniel Lair video

Start of clip.

(Daniel Lair, an A-level welder, is being interviewed inside a welding shop.)

(Daniel Lair says)

I was born in Calgary, but raised between Toronto and Ottawa region, moved back out here.

(Camera shows a view of Vancouver.)

(Interviewer asks)

What brought you to Vancouver?

(Daniel responds)

Mostly the scene. I'm into the outdoors, lots of jobs out here. I've been studying my A Level. It's my last chapter in my welding journey.

(Camera returns to Daniel Lair.)

This opportunity has had quite an impact on my life. It has allowed me to expand my job search knowledge. It has allowed me to find a trade, a very good trade, to be able to feed my family and move forward in life essentially.

(The camera shows Daniel Lair entering the Piping Industry College of British Columbia.)

The reasons why is it's an amalgamation of science, grit, spit, really hard work and essentially you can fabricate anything if you know how to weld.

(The camera shows Daniel Lair welding.)

It's amazing. The course is quite, it's quite impacting, essentially in the fact that you could do anything if you know how to weld, in my opinion.

I see myself in the future and to be able to become a general foreman, essentially, in the welding industry. Hopefully do some extra schooling to do a drafting course and work in the office, use this as a stepping stone.

(The camera returns to Daniel Lair.)

As far as enjoying this trade, as most jobs go, this has probably been and will be my favourite job I've ever had actually, welding.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet John Toneff

He is a welding apprentice seeking a Red Seal journeyman status.

Transcript for the Meet John Toneff video

Start of clip.

(John Toneff, a welding apprentice, is being interviewed inside a welding shop.)

(Interviewer asks)

What are you studying here?

(John Toneff responds)

I'm studying welding. I’m doing my apprenticeship.

(Interviewer asks)

How long have you been here for?

(John Toneff responds)

I’ve been here for five or six weeks now.

(Interviewer asks)

What made you decide to take on this field?

(John Toneff responds)

I decided to come with the welding just because, the whole family's not really trades related. I wanted to do something that was my own, make my own path through life and decided on welding because, like, when I was a kid, I liked melting stuff and just playing with fire, and I figured it was the natural choice for me.

(The camera shows John Toneff welding.)

The impact of this opportunity on my life has been massive.

(The camera returns to John Toneff.)

Already in the couple of short weeks that I've been here, I've been able to pay off bills and go and enjoy a little bit more freedoms financially with my girlfriend and my friends and family.

(The camera shows John Toneff welding.)

There's things I never thought I would have done. I was never really a hands on sort of person growing up, so it's all been fairly new to me, and I'm very grateful for the opportunity.

In the future, I'd like to have a Red Seal Journeyman status, possibly in more than one trade, but around this industry, I see myself being here for the rest of my life.

(Interviewer asks)

Any regrets?

(The camera returns to John Toneff.)

(John Toneff responds)

Absolutely no regrets.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Jim Longo

He is the President of Ideal Welders Ltd.

Transcript for the Meet Jim Longo video

Start of clip.

(Jim Longo, President of Ideal Welders Ltd., is being interviewed inside a welding shop.)

(Jim Longo responds)

I founded the company in 1969 as a one-man welding company.

(Camera shows different workers and the Ideal Welders Ltd. facilities.)

I learned welding from my father during the ‘50s and early ‘60s, formed Ideal Welders in 1969 as an owner-operator, and year after year, we ramped up with bigger facilities and now we're well over 150 people, still located in Vancouver.

(Camera shows the Piping Industry College of British Columbia and then workers and the Ideal Welders Ltd. facilities.)

My involvement in training is working through the local training schools, which contractors [and] governments fund to help bring young people to learn trades in steamfitting, welding, plumbing and [the] likes. When they're finished the schooling, basic training, they come in here to start serving an apprenticeship course, which generally is three to four years and they come out with their proper paperwork that creates a Journeyman.

(The camera rotates between Jim Longo and workers and the Ideal Welders Ltd. facilities.)

The Shipbuilding Strategy has created an opportunity for us to expand our business, create over 30 to 40 additional jobs, well in excess of two, three years, and I can see it growing to upwards of 70 or 80 full-time jobs for new people and existing people. Basic training to me, it's heartwarming to see young people that want a challenge, that want to get ahead, that are willing to work for it.

(The camera shows Jim Longo working in his office.)

The Canadian National Shipbuilding Strategy has impacted us in a very positive way out here in Vancouver by the creation of jobs, by the ability for us to reinvest in our equipment and our machinery and our men and our training, to create growth.

(The camera returns to Jim Longo.)

When I started the company at 20 years old, I had no idea that I would be where we're at today, but it's programs such as the National Shipbuilding that give us a plug that'll help us step forward and keep going.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Karen Campbell

She is a naval architecture and marine engineering student.

Transcript for the Meet Karen Campbell video

Start of clip.

(Karen Campbell, a Naval architecture and Marine Engineering student at the University of British Columbia (UBC), is being interviewed on campus.)

(Karen Campbell says)

So I started my undergrad at Queen's University in Kingston, studying science, and then I switched into mechanical engineering halfway through my degree. So I graduated from there in 2015. And directly after that, the following September, I came to UBC and started my Master's of engineering, studying naval architecture and marine engineering.

(The camera shows images of University of British Columbia campus and ships at sea.)

(Interviewer asks)

Why did you decide to study in this area?

(Karen Campbell responds)

I've always loved ships. I've always loved boats. I grew up on the water. When I switched into mechanical engineering and I was looking at possible careers going forward from that, the shipbuilding came up as an option.

(The camera returns to Karen Campbell.)

I looked into it, realized that Canada was in fact building ships so it was a good industry to be in.

(Interviewer asks)

What has this program brought to you personally?

(Karen Campbell responds)

It's been a great learning experience. I mean, they teach the theory of ship design in a crash course kind of environment. It's two terms of course work, so pretty intense.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

It's the combination of theory and getting us the right resources, and also connecting us up with industry people.

(Interviewer asks)

What do you see in your future in the shipbuilding industry?

(Karen Campbell responds)

So there's a lot of exciting directions I could go with my career. I'm definitely currently geared towards the shipbuilding industry. It's a global industry, which is really exciting.

(The camera returns to Karen Campbell.)

And there's also the design side of the industry I could see myself getting back into at some point.

(Interviewer asks)

What is it like for you to be in an industry that is male dominant?

(The camera shows shipyard workers.)

(Karen Campbell responds)

Working with guys, you get used to it pretty quickly.

(The camera returns to Karen Campbell.)

You know, you have to adapt. It's really nice when you come across other women in the industry. You bond pretty quickly.

(The camera shows construction at the shipyard.)

So that's one of the things I actually found that drew me into the industry, so when I first started looking into it, so I actually just picked up the phone and cold called a few places just to ask about it.

(The camera returns to Karen Campbell.)

And I've continued finding that, working, almost everywhere I go, people really like the shipbuilding industry, or just the marine industry. There's a lot of passion.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Chris McKesson

He is a professor of naval architecture and a retired naval architect.

Transcript for the Meet Chris McKesson video

Start of clip.

(Chris McKesson, a professor of naval architecture at the University of British Columbia (UBC), is being interviewed in his office.)

(Chris McKesson says)

I am degreed as a naval architect, that is to say a ship designer. And I spent 30 years commercially designing ships for various customers, and I retired from that position but with the desire to pass along the passion I have for that career to a future generation. I'm a 100% focused to teaching and passing on my design experience to a future generation.

(Chris McKesson walking into an office.)

(Interviewer asks)

What is it like to be a teacher in this program?

(Chris McKesson responds)

It's great, because we get a diverse group of students from all over the world who are united by our love of the sea and our love of ships. And 80% of our planet is ocean.

(The camera shows Chris McKesson working at his computer and images of the Vancouver Coast.)

The program is relatively new at UBC. We bring in students from all over the country, in fact all over the world. And in one year we are able to take engineers who have a Bachelor's degree in some other engineering discipline—as it were, civil engineering or mechanical engineering—and in one year we're able to apply those skills to the ship design problem in order to support Canada's ship design and ship construction industry. Our intention [and] our purpose is to provide highly qualified people to support Canada's maritime industry.

(Interviewer asks)

How does Seaspan support the program concretely?

(Chris McKesson responds)

Seaspan supports the program in fact concretely with cash by donating some funds. The most stand-out and identifiable contribution perhaps is their funding of two professorships. We also hope to expand the body of knowledge of what is naval architecture and make sure that it's a science and a discipline that's serving the 21st century.

(Interviewer asks)

What makes this program unique?

(The camera returns to Chris McKesson.)

(Chris McKesson responds)

You know, the UBC program in naval architecture is the only naval architecture degree west of the Mississippi in North America.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Heather Paul

She is a warehouse associate at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards.

Transcript for the Meet Heather Paul video

Start of clip.

(Heather Paul, a warehouse associate at Seaspan, is being interviewed at Seaspan’s Burnaby warehouse.)

(Interviewer asks)

Heather, tell us your story. What brought you to work here at Seaspan?

(The camera shows Heather Paul working in the warehouse.)

(Heather Paul responds)

My family mostly. I was living in Calgary, where I didn't have any family. And my mother's in a wheelchair, and she relies on my stepfather a lot. So I needed to move out here to be with them. I have a ten-year-old son. He's able to know his grandparents and his uncles.

(Interviewer asks)

Can you tell us some examples of the type of work you do here?

(Heather Paul responds)

Well, for instance, we just got in three crates, so I have to tear everything apart, make sure the product matches the paperwork, and we put it into inspection, and then quality control takes care of that part.

I've learned a lot, actually. I didn't know anything about ships, shipbuilding or anything. So it's neat to see all these parts come together on a boat.

(The camera returns to Heather Paul.)

I enjoy it. I enjoy my colleagues there. It's quite a small facility, so the interactions between my co-workers—it's tight.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

Meet Rick Pellerine

He is the Warehouse Supervisor at Seaspan’s warehouse in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Transcript for the Meet Rick Pellerine video

Start of clip.

(Rick Pellerine, the Warehouse Supervisor, is being interviewed at Seaspan’s warehouse in Burnaby.)

(Rick Pellerine says)

I'm the Warehouse Supervisor at the Seaspan warehouse in Burnaby. I oversee the daily operations in the warehouse here.

I'm an ex-military sailor, and I was fortunate enough to spend a lot of my career sailing around on the navy supply ships. And when I was looking for a job after I retired from the military, I’d seen a warehouse position that involved the construction of navy supply ships, which excited me.

(The camera shows Rick Pellerine working in the warehouse.)

Warehousing was one of the key roles as a supply technician in the military.

(The camera returns to Rick Pellerine.)

All the leadership training that I'd received, just all of the experience that you receive in the military is proving very beneficial here.

(The camera shows various west coast images.)

My life has been changed. The opportunity to live on the west coast. I had spent a couple of years here many years ago and just got a taste of it. I realized that it's a totally different lifestyle out here. You can do pretty much anything you want outside all year round. The quality of life on the west coast is, in my opinion, the best in the country.

(The camera returns to Rick Pellerine.)

I thoroughly enjoy my job. I have some of the best people I've ever worked with anywhere in my career work here in the warehouse with me.

Yeah, it's really hard to complain when you come to work and you enjoy coming to work, you know that the people that work with you and work for you are fantastic. I have fantastic support. I have a great boss. Our organization I work in, supply chain management, is very strong. I have a very good group of people.

(Public Services and Procurement Canada’s links to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn appear.)

(The Government of Canada Wordmark appears on a white screen.)

End of clip.

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