Reconstruction of the Voltigeurs de Québec Armoury in Québec

Live from the reconstruction site!

From fire to reconstruction

The Voltigeurs de Québec Armoury in Québec, home to the oldest French-Canadian regiment still in existence, was damaged by fire in April 2008. One of the Government of Canada's first actions was to clean up the site and undertake the initial work to preserve the remaining structure. In the meantime, the Voltigeurs regiment has been moved to a new site for a 10-year period.

In 2009 and 2010, Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) carried out a series of activities to come up with a plan for the future of the Armoury: public consultations, a feasibility and profitability analysis, a variety of historical, archaeological and environmental analyses, and studies and post-disaster structural evaluations.

PWGSC then carried out a program for the allocation of functional and technical space, additional consultations with Québec organizations and major rehabilitation work to clean up the interior of the building in order to preserve and maintain it. This involved an assessment of the masonry, in-depth cleaning, the structural reinforcement of the building and the installation of semi-permanent heating and ventilation systems.

Federal government environmental and architectural heritage experts have conducted surveys and drawn up plans and specifications for the work associated with components to be preserved or restored. Some of the components have been sorted and stored on site, outside the buildings.

In June 2011, following an open and transparent tendering process, PWGSC awarded a contract to Arcop (now Architecture 49 Inc.), D.F.S. Inc. Architecture and Design, St Gelais Montminy and Associates, joint venture architects, to prepare the architectural designs and sketches for reconstruction of the Armoury, as well as plans and specifications.

In November 2012, the Government of Canada unveiled the Design for reconstruction of the Voltigeurs de Québec Armoury.

In 2015, Arcop, D.F.S. Inc. Architecture and Design, St Gelais Montminy and Associates, joint venture architects, provided PWGSC with plans and specifications.

On May 19, 2015, following an open and transparent tendering process launched in January 2015, PWGSC awarded a contract evaluated at $72.7 million (taxes included) to Pomerleau Inc. for the reconstruction and expansion of the Armoury. Reconstruction is underway and should be completed by summer 2017.

The reconstruction of the Voltigeurs de Québec Armoury represents an investment of approximately $104M under Canada's Economic Action Plan, notably $93M expected for the reconstruction and $11.3M invested towards consultations, the development of a plan for the future of the Armoury, a feasibility and cost-effectiveness analysis, the development of the concepts, as well as work towards the rehabilitation and preparation of the site.

About the Armoury

Built in 1887 and expanded in 1913, the Armoury has always been a prominent feature of the Québec landscape. It was designed by Québec architect Eugène-Étienne Taché who is known for his designs for the Quebec National Assembly building and the former Québec courthouse.

Its influence on a number of subsequent major Canadian buildings' style led to the Armoury being designated a "national historic site of Canada" on the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which also includes the parade ground (Place Georges-V) located between the building and Grande Allée to the north. The building was also "Classified" on the recommendation of the Federal Heritage Building Review Office, meaning that it obtained the highest heritage designation that can be granted to a federal building by the Minister of the Environment.

Despite the damage it sustained, the building retains some of its architectural integrity and most of the features that make it an exceptional example of the Château style.

It is a landmark in the memory of Canadians, valued for its associations with the Voltigeurs de Québec—the oldest French-Canadian regiment still in existence—and the Royal Rifles of Canada.