NPMS Procedure – Managing Projects for Heritage Properties

Table of contents

  1. Effective Date
  2. Cancellations
  3. Authority
  4. Context
  5. Scope
  6. Purpose
  7. Details
  8. Responsibilities
  9. Definitions
  10. References
  11. Attachments
  12. Enquiries

1. Effective Date

January 9, 2013

2. Cancellations

None

3. Authority

This National Project Management System (NPMS) procedure is issued under the authority of the Director General (DG), Professional and Technical Service Management Sector (PTSM), Real Property Branch (RPB), Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC).

4. Context

This procedure describes the mandatory activities to be implemented within the National Project Management System (NPMS) as it relates to asset and space-based projects on heritage assets throughout all of the federal government, and is to be read in conjunction with:

This procedure supports the Treasury Board Policy on Management of Real Property, which includes ensuring that the heritage character of federal-owned buildings is respected and conserved throughout their life-cycles.

5. Scope

This procedure is applicable to all PSPC employees involved in the management of real property projects on buildings designated, or that have the potential to be designated, by the Federal Heritage Buildings Review office (FHBRO). The principles of this procedure are also applicable to projects on national historic sites and to buildings, structures, or sites designated by other levels of government.

6. Purpose

The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that Real Property projects undertaken by PSPC respect federal policy obligations regarding the stewardship of federal heritage buildings, structures, or historic sites before, during and after project development and delivery; and to ensure these projects integrate international heritage conservation best practices within the NPMS process.

Although heritage designations by other jurisdictions are not always legally binding on the federal government, it is important to understand their specific obligations and intent in order to meet the federal government's broad objective to be a responsible steward of cultural heritage and to respect RPB's Good Neighbour Policy. Similarly, it is recommended that the principles of this procedure be applied to projects on historic sites or structures that are not buildings, and which may not be subject to federal policy or legislation.

7. Details

In all stages of the NPMS process, the appropriate heritage conservation expert must be consulted in order to determine the exact scope of the following activities, as required by the specific project:

7.1 Project Inception Stage

This stage involves the Definition Phase of the project and results in the Statement of Requirements deliverable.

For all projects (space-based and asset-based):

For projects in leased heritage buildings, identify the heritage designation and the designating jurisdiction (municipal, provincial or federal) in the Statement of Requirements (SOR).

For projects in Crown-owned buildings under the custodianship of PSPC:

  • Confirm the age of the building. If the building is approaching, at, or over 40 years of age, confirm whether the building has been evaluated by the FHBRO and confirm its designation status.
  • If the building has not yet been evaluated, consult with the Regional Heritage Coordinator to initiate the evaluation process.
  • Pending the evaluation by the FHBRO, integrate information about the eligibility for designation into the Statement of Requirements (SOR).
  • Check whether the site is, or is part of, a National Historic Site of Canada, or if designated by any other jurisdictions, and identify any such designations in the SOR.
  • If the building is designated Classified or Recognized, identify the level of designation, (either Classified, or Recognized) and obtain the Heritage Character Statement from FHBRO and/or the Commemorative Integrity Statement for a National Historic Site (if available).
  • The Statement of Requirements shall include:
    • In 'Section 1.0 Problem/Opportunity Definition', the identification of heritage conservation as a special consideration that will need to be integrated into the decision-making process throughout the project; and,
    • In 'Section 2.0 Background', any applicable heritage designations.

For Projects in OGD-owned (Other Government Department) buildings 40 years old or older:

When PSPC is involved in preparing the SOR on behalf of an OGD client, the following actions shall be undertaken, in keeping with client approvals and governance:

  • Confirm the designation status, and if designated obtain the Heritage Character Statement.
  • Remind the client of the requirements of the Treasury Board Policy on Management of Real Property, and ensure that project responsibilities for implementing compliance activities are included in the project charter.
  • Ensure that adequate information is available to understand the building condition, history, and evolution in order to protect the heritage values and character-defining elements throughout the project.
  • Identify the heritage designation (or eligibility for designation) in the SOR.

7.2 Project Identification Stage

This stage includes the Initiation, Feasibility, Analysis, and Identification Closeout Phases of the project, resulting in the Preliminary Project Plan (PPP), the Feasibility Report (FR), the Investment Analysis Report (IAR) and the Identification Close-out Document (ICOD).

For all projects (space-based and asset-based):

  • Ensure that adequate information has been gathered to understand what and where the heritage values are found in the building that the project may impact.
  • Confirm the suitability of use and opportunities/constraints of the project in relation to the impact to the heritage values of the building or site.
  • Confirm that the project options being considered have followed heritage conservation principles and practice.
  • Broadly identify the heritage conservation component of the project and the heritage conservation resource requirements in the PPP.

For projects in Classified or Recognized Crown-owned buildings under the custodianship of PSPC:

  • For Classified buildings, obtain or (if it does not already exist) commission a Conservation Plan for the building, which gathers adequate information to understand the building condition, history, evolution, heritage values and character-defining elements.
  • For Recognized buildings, ensure the availability of adequate information to understand the building condition, heritage character, options, costs, risks, suitability of use and opportunities/constraints.
  • Develop conservation options and factor heritage conservation impact/opportunities and cost impacts into final options analysis for the development of the recommended option.
  • Ensure that the analysis is based on a life-cycle costing (LCC) approach and considers equally the costs and the benefits related to the heritage building and heritage conservation.

For projects in OGD-owned buildings 40 years old or older:

If RPB is involved in preparing any of the documents listed below on behalf of the client, the requirements listed for each shall be applied in keeping with client approvals and governance.

Include heritage conservation objectives into the deliverables of this NPMS stage as follows:

Preliminary Project Plan (PPP)

Integrate the information and recommendations provided by the Conservation Plan, into the PPP in the following sections:

  • 3.0 Scope Management: ensure that heritage conservation considerations are analyzed as part of the identification of the project's problems/opportunities.
  • 3.2.1 Constraints: identify any project constraints that may impact on project's ability to protect the asset's heritage character.
  • 4.0 Schedule Plan: identify any requirements that may affect the schedule, such as the heritage evaluation, FHBRO project reviews, the development of heritage guidance documents, etc.
  • 11.0 Human Resources Management: ensure that the required heritage conservation expertise is identified, as well as the role of the FHBRO for any reviews.

Feasibility Report (FR)

The Feasibility Report's analysis of the proposed broad solutions shall address how heritage conservation concerns can best be addressed by the project (for example, whether a proposed new use is appropriate for the building).

Investment Analysis Report (IAR)

The analysis of options in the IAR must take a balanced approach to the costs and benefits (both financial and non-financial) and strategic considerations of proposed heritage conservation activities. In recommending an investment proposal, the IAR should include heritage conservation concerns in the analysis of the approaches' implications.

7.3 Project Delivery Stage

This stage includes the Planning, Design, Implementation and Delivery Close-out Phases of the project. It results in completion of the project, documented in the Project Management Plan (PMP), Approval document (AD), Project Turn-over (PTO) and Close Out Document (COD).

For all projects (space-based and asset-based):

  • Obtain appropriate heritage conservation advice, and integrate advice into the design and construction documents and throughout the construction process.
  • Ensure that the proposal's impact on the heritage character of the building is evaluated based on the Heritage Character Statement for the building and the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada, latest edition.
  • Identify any regionally-specific process that may apply in the PMP.
  • For projects in leased heritage buildings designated by other jurisdictions, coordinate with the owner to obtain the required reviews.

For projects in Classified Crown-owned buildings under the custodianship of PSPC:

  • Ensure that heritage guidance documents are available and applied by the design team.
  • Contact the Regional Heritage Coordinator to follow any regionally-specific procedures.
  • Conduct heritage recording before, during and after any (major) intervention.
  • Undertake special investigations and/or tests as required to better understand conservation requirements.
  • Develop with FHBRO, a review process appropriate to the scale, scope and complexity of the project:
    1. Large projects may require Reviews of Intervention at the Design Concept, Design Development, and 99% tender document stages;
    2. Highly complex projects in Classified buildings may require reviews of selected aspects of the project at additional stages (33% tender document stage);
    3. FHBRO may request in some cases that a "Formal" Review of Intervention take place before the Federal Heritage Buildings (FHB) Committee. (See Guide to Working with the FHBRO);
    4. Smaller and or less complex projects may require reviews in the Schematic and Design Development Phases.
  • Upon the completion of the project, update the building's maintenance management plan.

For projects in Recognized Crown-owned buildings under the custodianship of PSPC:

  • Consult with FHBRO regarding their potential role in the review process.
  • Ensure that a qualified heritage conservation specialist is involved in the review of planning, design and construction documents.
  • Provide written confirmation in the project file that appropriate conservation advice was obtained either from a private sector consultant or through a review by internal PSPC conservation experts.

For projects in OGD-owned buildings 40 years old or older:

  • In reviewing client-prepared project documentation (during the Project Inception and Identification Stages), ensure that any heritage conservation concerns are appropriately addressed.
  • Apply this procedure in accordance with client direction, approvals and governance.

Note: To address any technical heritage conservation issues, in-house specialized expertise is available from the Professional and Technical Services group in all regions, and from the Heritage Conservation Directorate in the National Capital Region (NCR).

8. Responsibilities

The Director, Heritage Conservation Directorate, is responsible for overseeing and maintaining this procedure.

Regional directors, Professional and Technical Services, are responsible for the overall implementation of this Procedure within their respective geographical jurisdictions. 

Project Leaders, who may be represented by Property Managers/Officers, Asset Managers, Project Managers, Client Accommodation Advisors and/or Accommodation Managers, are responsible for:

  • ensuring that heritage conservation information is integrated into the Deliverables from the Project Inception and Identification stages, as described in this procedure, and
  • that the appropriate heritage conservation expertise is involved to define the level of effort required to meet the mandatory requirements of this procedure.

Project Managers are responsible for:

  • ensuring that heritage conservation concerns are integrated into the Deliverables from the Project Delivery stage, as described in this procedure, and
  • that the appropriate heritage conservation expertise is involved to define the level of effort required to meet the mandatory requirements of this procedure.

The Project Leader, Project Manager, and Project Team members are responsible for:

  • ensuring that he or she is aware of the federal government's obligations for its heritage assets,
  • adapting the implementation of this procedure, based on the impact on heritage values, to suit the project parameters,
  • reminding custodian departments of the requirements of the Treasury Board Policy on Management of Real Property as it relates to their heritage buildings, and with the recommendations of the FHBRO.

9. Definitions

Character-defining Element:

The materials, forms, location, spatial configurations, uses and cultural associations or meanings that contribute to the heritage value of an historic place, which must be retained to preserve its heritage value.

Classified Building:

The highest level of designation for a Federal Heritage Building.

Commemorative Integrity Statement (CIS):

This document is prepared to guide the management of National Historic Sites of Canada (NHSC). It is generally used only by Parks Canada for their sites, but it is recommended for any federally-owned NHSC.

Conservation Plan:

This is a heritage guidance document that is non-project specific and which provides long-term guidance for the protection of heritage values and character defining elements of a building. It is a compilation of relevant historical information on the asset and its evolution, describes its heritage values, the overall condition of its character defining elements, and recommends appropriate approaches to be followed for the conservation of the asset.

Designation:

Designation is a recognition assigned to a building, site or structure, typically by a level of government, either municipally, provincially or federally and governed by a policy or legislation. To determine if a building, site or structure has a level of designation one can contact the local or provincial heritage department, or in the case of federal designation, Parks Canada.

Disposal:

In the context of the heritage obligations of the Treasury Board Policy on the Management of Real Property, a disposal is defined as a transaction that alienates real property from a department's inventory to a non-department(as defined under Section 2 of the Financial Administration Act), to the Provincial Crown, or to private interests.

Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office (FHBRO):

The interdepartmental advisory body, which resides in the Parks Canada Agency to recommend heritage designation and to advise custodial departments on protecting the heritage character of the heritage buildings in their custody.

Heritage Character Statement (HCS):

This document is prepared by the FHBRO after a building has been designated as either Classified or Recognized. Its intent is to guide the on-going management of a building, and is the basis for reviewing any proposed changes or interventions. It explains why the building was designated, and which of its physical features (character–defining elements) must be preserved in order to protect the building's heritage character.

Heritage Character:

This is the synthesis of a building's heritage values. The heritage values of Crown-owned buildings derive from many sources. These include historical associations, architectural significance and environmental importance.

Heritage Recording:

The action of documenting the heritage values and heritage character-defining elements of a building or site and producing a posterity record containing visual and metric information.

Heritage Value:

This is the aesthetic, historic, scientific, cultural, social or spiritual importance or significance for past, present and future generations. The heritage value of an historic place is embodied in its character-defining materials, forms, location, spatial configurations, uses and cultural associations or meanings.

Interventions:

Any action which may have an impact on the heritage character of a federal heritage building including alteration, demolition or disposal.

Life-Cycle Costing:

 This is an approach to identifying the total costs of goods or services, including the up-front costs, operating and maintenance costs, the cost of disposal or closure activities, as well as the administrative costs associated with the various options for acquiring the goods or services. Ref: PSPC, Material Management, Contract Management Guide, February 2009.

Potential Federal Heritage Building:

Any building owned by the federal government, which is at least forty years old and has not been evaluated by the FHBRO. In the context of this procedure, this would also include buildings that are not yet 40 years old but that possess high architectural or historical importance.

Recognized Building:

This is the second level of designation for a federal heritage building.

10. References

Legislation

Treasury Board

Parks Canada

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Real Property Branch

11. Attachments

Annex A: Checklist for the NPMS Procedure for Managing Projects in Designated or Potential Heritage Properties

12. Enquiries

Director
Heritage Conservation Directorate
Professional and Technical Service Management Sector
hcd.dcp@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Annex A: Checklist for the NPMS Procedure - Managing Projects for Heritage Properties

1. NPMS Project Inception Stage

Project Leader: As Project Leader responsible for ensuring that this NPMS procedure is followed throughout this stage of the project, have the following questions been addressed?

  • checkboxIs the building 40 years old or approaching 40 years?

  • checkboxIf so, has the building been evaluated by the Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office (FHBRO)?

  • checkboxIf the building has not been evaluated, has the Regional Heritage Coordinator been contacted to initiate the evaluation procedure and FHBRO been consulted with regard to the potential that the building will be designated?

  • checkboxIf the building has been evaluated, has it been designated as either "Classified" or "Recognized", or is it "Not Designated"?

  • checkboxHas the designation status been identified in the Statement of Requirements for the project?

  • checkboxDo you have the Heritage Character Statement for the building from FHBRO?

  • checkboxDoes a Conservation Plan exist?

2. NPMS Project Identification Stage

Project Leader: As Project Leader responsible for ensuring that this NPMS procedure is followed throughout this stage of the project, have the following questions been addressed?

  • checkboxHave the designation and requirements for protecting the Heritage Values and Character Defining Elements been identified in the Preliminary Project Plan (PPP) and Feasibility Report (FR)?

  • checkboxHave the economic, environmental, social and cultural costs and benefits of reusing a heritage building been included in the Investment Analysis Report (IAR) based on a life cycle costing approach?

  • checkboxHas the need for qualified heritage conservation advice been established?

  • checkboxFor major projects in Classified heritage buildings, have a Conservation Plan and heritage recording been completed or planned?

  • checkboxHave key milestones for FHBRO Reviews of Intervention been identified, e.g. 33% tender document stage, 66%, etc.?

3. NPMS Project Delivery Stage

Project Manager: As Project Manager responsible for ensuring that the NPMS procedure is followed throughout this stage of the project, have the following questions been addressed?

  • checkboxFor Classified heritage buildings, has a Conservation Plan been written and its recommendations integrated into the Project Plan for implementation throughout this stage?

  • checkboxFor Recognized heritage buildings, has adequate information been gathered as needed to understand the building condition, history, and evolution in order to protect the Heritage Values and Character Defining Elements throughout the project? Has this information been integrated into the Project Plan?

  • checkboxHave any required special investigations and tests related to the historic building fabric been scheduled and/or undertaken?

  • checkboxHas qualified heritage conservation advice been incorporated into the design and construction documents as well as throughout the construction process?

  • checkboxHas Heritage Recording been scheduled and conducted before, during, and after the project to document changes and/or help monitor the condition of the building?

  • checkboxHave the Reviews of Intervention with FHBRO (in the case of a Classified building) or with a heritage conservation professional (in the case of a Recognized building) been scheduled and/or implemented?

  • checkboxHave records been kept of the Reviews of Intervention and follow-up?

  • checkboxHas the building's maintenance manual been updated to include changes to Character Defining Elements of the building? Has it been incorporated into the Project Turn Over (PTO) document?