IM Plan Template

PSPC Information Management (IM)

Project Name: - Not a title

Prepared by: Branch, Division name - Not a title

Date: Date

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Information Management Roles and Responsibilities
  3. Information Management Plan
  4. Considerations and Processes
  5. Performance Indicators
  6. Appendix 1 - Policies, Acts and Directives
  7. Appendix 2 - Roles and Responsibilities
  8. Appendix 3 - Definitions
  9. Appendix 4 - Storage Medium

1. Introduction

1.1 Executive Overview

The Government of Canada (GC) creates vast amount of information that enables the delivery of programs, services and products to Canadians or on behalf of Canadians, supports the reporting of results to Parliament, and ensures accountability and transparency of actions. As these information resources are valuable and critical factors in the success of any endeavor, structured planning of their management must occur to meet corporate goals and to successfully deliver programs and services.

This document describes the information management (IM) processes that will be used within the (name of project).

These processes are drawn from federal legislation, policies, directives, standards and practices that apply to the administration and management of information and technology across government and within Public Works Government Services Canada.

Insert a paragraph specifically covering the executive overview/summary of the project.

This is a living document and will be reviewed and updated on an ongoing basis for projects or semi-annually for programs and services to ensure consistency with IM standards and to take into consideration new storage mediums, tools and IM solutions.

1.2 Objectives of the Project/Service/Product

Define the objectives by providing any additional information on the project and provide the reference to the information source where the project is described e.g. Project Charter, Web site link.

1.3 Purpose

The purpose of this document is to:

  • Identify all information assets related to the (name of project);
  • Facilitate compliance with government policy and standards, using best IM practices and Library and Archives Canada requirements for the disposition of GC records;
  • Facilitate the safeguarding, storage and retrieval of information resources generated in the performance of this project; and
  • Establish a balanced IM solution for the (name of project).

1.4 Scope

Only information assets concerning the (name of project) will be defined within this document. Information assets consist of documents that describe the delivery of a project/program/service; records decisions and actions; provides evidence of financial and legal transactions; has policy, program and procedure implications; is needed to account to Parliament and to the public; or may have historical value. This information can take on many forms including paper, electronic, photographs and film, digital images, video, audio, and microfiche.

1.5 Organizational Capacity

Describe the organization's current capacity to manage the information assets, which will be generated from this project. Discuss: IM capacity, awareness, organizational culture, changes management and external influences.

2. Information Management Roles and Responsibilities

Provide context. Include governance structure, org chart and/or project reporting matrix.

Define roles and responsibilities of committees and/or working groups and link into the PSPC governance structure.

Because we all create, collect and receive information as part of our day-to-day work, we are all responsible for effectively managing that information while it's in our care and custody.

Employees/Team members will need to:

  • Document business activities and decisions;
  • Comply with institutional DP 102 Information Management PolicyThis link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet., using approved tools, systems and procedures;
  • Organize, file and store information, ensuring it's easily accessible when needed to make decisions and to support program and service delivery;
  • Share and re-use information to support collaboration and facilitate business operations, respecting all legal and policy requirements;
  • Protect sensitive information, providing or restricting its access in accordance with law and policy;
  • Manage information with long-term or historical value to support legislative and policy requirements that govern its retention and disposal;
  • Protect and preserve information critical to business resumption;
  • Comply with official languages requirements.

See Appendix 2 - Roles and Responsibilities for the key roles and their responsibilities.

3. Information Management Plan

3.1 Information Management

The following key principles of IM promote the efficient use of institutional resources; make information easier to find in the future, and ensure its protection and preservation - all in accordance with business, legal and policy requirements:

  • Avoid collecting duplicate information;
  • Share and re-use information, respecting legal restrictions;
  • Information should be complete, accurate, current, relevant, and understandable;
  • Support access to information, respecting privacy, policy and legal requirements;
  • Safeguard information against unlawful access, loss and damage;
  • Preserve information of historical value.

The following diagram illustrates the seven (7) stages comprising the life cycle of information.

The following diagram illustrates 7 stages comprising the life cycle of information assets: 1 plan, 2 collect, create, receive and capture, 3 organize, 4 use and disseminate, 5 maintain protect and preserve, 6 dispose, and 7 evaluate.

Only information, which has been deemed an asset (of business value), will be documented as part of this IM Plan and managed throughout its lifecycle.

Reference documents and information of a transitory nature will not be documented as part of this IM Plan.

These include: information that has no business or service delivery value has no legal, fiscal administrative, operational or historical value, and is needed only for a limited period of time.

Examples of transitory information This link is available only to clients with access to The Source, the PWGSC/PSPC intranet. include:

  • Duplicate documents used for reference;
  • External publications;
  • Emails of an informative nature;
  • Generic broadcast messages;
  • And personal information.

This plan has been segregated into several elements relevant to IM. Each requirement will identify parts of the management plan.

The workbook that houses all of the defining elements related to our information assets is located in the Appendix. The points below describe how each element will be actioned and managed over time.

3.2 Data, record & document management

Define all the data, records and documents produced during the life of the project.

Link to the Appendix.

3.3 Information flow

Define the flow of each information type and/or element (i.e. data, records and documents), ensuring that the point of creation and the point of storage as well as the entire flow is clearly identified (recommend using a flow diagram).

3.4 Metadata

Define the metadata elements for each data set, records and documents listed above, including:

  • A brief description;
  • Ownership;
  • Storage medium;
  • Date of creation;
  • Last edited date;
  • Linkages between each element;
  • Source of origin;
  • Usage;
  • Target audience;
  • Target date for archival;
  • Target date for disposition.

Note: Link to the Appendix - Document Description Chart for all required metadata elements.

Please refer to the Government of Canada Records Management Metadata Standard (GC RMMS) to help populate this table.

3.5 Document versioning

Define the approach and method that will be used to manage documents/records versioning.

Link to the Appendix.

3.6 Classification and naming

Identify the classification plan that will be used.

Define the methodology used to name files (including databases, applications, documents and records). Example: (for E-DRM documents) Subject-Type_Specifics_Reference Period (if applicable) Concrete example: PRJ-Project Charter -CLF 2.0 Project June 2010

Note: Web based applications/databases must confirm to Common Look and Feel requirements This link is available only to clients with access to The Source, the PWGSC/PSPC intranet..

Note: File naming convention must conform to Recordkeeping and Official Language policies.

Refer to DP 044 Records Management & Information Holdings This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet.

3.7 Storage Medium

Define the storage medium, which will be used in the context of this Project's lifecycle.

Table Summary

The table describes the storage medium, rationale for use, location, resumption plans and service provisions.

Storage Medium Rational for use Location Resumption Plan Identified Other Information
Example 1: Web site Provides information on our product/service PSPC-ITSB hosted Internet City provides 12X5 support at 99.5% http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/xxx
Example 2: E-DRM Used to house and provide access to all draft and final version of documents PSPC-ITSB hosted Part of service provision - 12X5 support at 99.5% Available via Web from:
Example 3: Filing Cabinet   PSPC-ITSB    
Example 4: E-mail        

3.8 Access & Security

Information law and policy define the right of access to government held information and its exemptions (i.e.: DP 002 Policy on Access to Information and Privacy Acts This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet.). Beyond being available, information must be easily and conveniently accessible with appropriate controls in place to ensure access is authorized and to protect privacy and confidentiality. It should be available for access in alternate formats and through channels responsive to user needs and consistent with government communications requirements, such as official languages and federal identity.

Provision must be made to ensure information remains available and accessible over time. This may include migration strategies to provide for changes to technology. Define the measures that will be taken and any mitigation strategy - key elements to describe: Information holdings, channel & access options, access rights & limitations, user interface, discovery tools, disseminating information and usability over time.

Refer to: DP 002 Policy on Access to Information and Privacy Acts This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet..

In addition, information must be protected against unauthorized access, modifications, and disclosure. Provisions must be made to ensure that the integrity of information is not lost or compromised through accident, error, or malicious intent and that access is not inhibited through denial of service or other attacks. Audit trails and controls are required to provide a history of events so that parties may not deny participating in a transaction and so that information may be recovered in the event of loss or corruption. All public servants must comply with the Policy on Government Security.

  • Define security requirements and access rights in terms of who has access to information what information and for what purposes;
  • Define where and how to get the information, including the necessary workflow;
  • Define data integrity measures and mitigation;
  • Define recovery measures in the event of accident, service denial, attack or order;
  • Identify Business Resumption Plan and where this document can be found, who has access to it, who is responsible for updating it and its current lifecycle;
  • It is recommend to work with IM Specialists to ensure essential information can be made available and business resumed in the event of information loss or compromise.

Refer to:

Key Elements: Availability & Integrity, Accessibility and Confidentiality.

3.9 Retention

Having identified the required information, determine:

  • How long the information will be required to directly support delivery activities:
  • Protection of essential records so that if information critical to running government suffers loss or is compromised, it may be recovered and business can resume;
  • How to preserve and protect it so that it is available when needed. This may include environmental controls to ensure preservation of the media on which the information is recorded, and redundant storage strategies, such as off-site storage. This information may be required for disaster recovery and business resumption purposes.

Information created or obtained through collection, capture or receipt must include metadata that provides important business context to associate the information with the business activity(s), function(s), and transaction(s) to which it pertains. Information should be organized to provide clarity, context, and convenient and timely access. Generally, an institution-wide information classification scheme will be in place to support this. Define the classification scheme addresses the full breath of the information access requirements and that mechanisms are in place to tag information with the appropriate classification(s).

Refer to DP 044 Records Management & Information Holdings This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet..

Key elements: Information Collection & Classification, Information Storage and Preservation, Information Protection, Information Retention.

3.10 Disposal

Define approach, processes, disposition authority and retention schedule for each data type, records and document. Consider the business and historical value for each document as part of the disposition schedule. Identify documents/records that will be transferred to another entity. Summarize the document in this section and link to the details in Appendix A - Document Description Chart.

Official documentation such as documents of business or historical value should be submitted to the departmental library, to be considered as corporate assets.

Surplus publications should be forwarded to Library and Archives Canada - For assistance, call 819-956-3465 or e-mail biblio@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca (refer to DP 066 Departmental Library Services This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet.).

** Refer to your Branch's Record Disposition Authority and Retention Schedule(s) - contact PSPC Records Management for assistance This link is available only to clients with access to The Source, the PWGSC/PSPC intranet..

3.11 Knowledge Management (KM)

Knowledge Management (KM) comprises a range of practices used by organizations to identify, share and document knowledge.

Define the context that will apply.

3.12 Strategy and Tools

Define the KM strategy, practices and tools that will be used to manage the knowledge. Consider the knowledge requirements of new and existing employees - what should they know before they can be productive members of the team; what should happen when an employee/contractor leaves the team?

Define communication mechanisms and strategy. Link to the Communication Plan and the Overall Unit Learning Plan.

3.13 Mitigation Practices

Define KM practices to mitigate knowledge gaps or loss. Define plans for succession and resourcing backfills, link to your detailed Human Resources Plan.

During the project lifecycle, the organization needs to focus on sharing and utilizing all available knowledge. The following knowledge sharing practices are especially helpful in the case of employee turnover, or even to quickly bring external resources up to speed on the project.

Direct Learning:
"Hands-on" experience and/or cross training.
Knowledge visualization:
Diagrams, flow charts, storyboards, and dynamic presentations.
Seminars and Webinars:
Formal event geared towards knowledge delivery. The latter can deliver the message in an ongoing fashion and allow recorded discussion (on the web).
Newsletters & Journals:
Typical communication channels that allow the transfer of knowledge in smaller, incremental units that are easier to absorb and retain.

3.14 Migration Plans

Define the strategy and action plan for tacit documentation of knowledge to allow for sharing and management purposes.

4. Considerations and Processes

Define overall processes and standards that will be applied.

4.1 Corporate or Legislative Considerations

Provide context.
Example: Official Languages.

4.2 Considerations

Define Project/Service/Product based considerations.
Example: context of Official Language policies and requirements.

4.3 Other

Provide context.

4.4 Requirements & Process

Define necessity and process to follow. Link back to section 3.1 Information Management above concerning storage and lifecycle.

Example: Items that could be scanned include paper copies and signed documents. The process involves sending the document to the Branch/Unit "Information Management Group". The Branch/Unit "Information Management Group" will scan the document to convert it to PDF format. The PDF electronic version will be stored in E-DRM. The hard copy will be considered as the authoritative source and will be kept in the filing cabinet under the management of (add name here).

Note: Both the electronic and the paper versions must be documented and managed as part of the IM Plan.

5. Performance Indicators

Define the strategy that will be used to measure success against the IM Plan.

5.1 Risk Management Strategy for IM

Define the Risk Management Strategy.

Table Summary

This table describes the risk management strategy for information management.

Risk No. Risk Name Controllable or Uncontrollable Risk Statement Response (Avoid/
Control/ Assume/
Mitigate/ Watch/
Escalate/ Transfer)
Probability and Impact
(Low/Med/High and
Minor/Mod/Significant)
Action Plan
             
             
             
             

5.2 Performance Indicators for Successful Information Management

Provide context.

Table Summary

This table describes the performance indicators and context for successful information management.

Indicator No Outcome Desired Performance Indicator Name Performance Indicator Description Success Factor(s) Performance Measure Timeline Approval Authority
             
             
             

6. Appendix 1 - Policies, Acts and Directives

7. Appendix 2 - Roles and Responsibilities

7.1 Project Champion or Service/Product Authority

  • Overseeing compliance with all federal legislation and departmental policies and directives (see Appendix 1 - Policies, Acts and Directives).
  • Championing the principles espoused in the TBS - Policy on Information Management, including facilitating the use of electronic systems for creating, using and managing information resources throughout their life cycle;
  • Overseeing the strategic planning and resourcing activities related to the management of information resources;
  • Ensuring that information management requirements (including records management, systems development, etc) are identified and addressed at an early stage of any operational program design; and
  • Designating a senior manager who will be an active member of a committee on the management of records and information holdings and an advocate of the records management principles.

7.2 Project/Service/Product Director

  • Appointing resources to develop the Information Management plan:
  • Appointing an Information Manager to carry out assigned duties on a day-to-day basis; and
  • Ensuring that the Information Management Plan is agreed upon, in place and being followed.

7.3 Project Manager

  • Ensuring all employees and persons engaged under contract comply with federal legislation and departmental policies and directives for the management of information;
  • Ensuring all employees and persons engaged under contract receive the required training in the management of information resources;
  • Planning, resourcing and implementing activities related to the management of information resources, including the use of automation;
  • Identifying and addressing requirements for information resources at an early stage of any program design; and
  • Co-operating with departmental records management specialists on the efficiency and effectiveness of plans and activities related to the management of information resources.

7.4 Information Manager

The Information Manager is responsible for establishing and supporting the Information Management practices for the (add name of Project/Program/Service). Specific duties include:

  • Preparing an Information Management Plan, in coordination with the Project Director and the Project Manager and the appropriate Information Management Specialists:
  • Updating the IM Plan, as required and as new issues emerge;
  • Advising Project Team Members on issues related to the IM plan;
  • Coordinating the Implementation of the IM Solution for the Project;
  • Coordinating training on any IM Solution Tools as required; and
  • Liaising with Departmental Information Specialists or Departmental IM Advisors.

7.5 Information Management Specialist

Information Management Specialists - including librarians, archivists, access to information and privacy officials, records management specialists, Web management specialists, forms management specialists, and security specialists will support information management efforts by:

  • Providing IM advice, tools, procedures, standards, and guidelines, consistent with direction provided by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and Library and Archives Canada;
  • Aiding the Information Manager in the implementation of the IM Plan:
  • Identifying enterprise level information requirements to information technology personnel to support the development and operation of IT processes, systems, standards, and tools; and assessing specific IM resource and training requirements and working with the Information Manager to implement these needs.

7.6 Information Management Advisors

Information Management Advisors are the resources under the Knowledge and Information Management Directorate (KIMD) and will support information management efforts by:

  • Providing IM advice and support on all aspects of managing the information resource;
  • Providing advice and guidance on information architecture;
  • Providing feedback on the IM Plan;
  • Aiding the Information Manager in the implementation of the IM Plan;
  • Identifying enterprise level information requirements to information technology personnel to support the development and operation of IT processes, systems, standards, and tools; and
  • Assessing general IM training requirements and working with the Information Manager to implement these needs.

7.7 Teams members

Applying effective principles, standards, guidelines and practices for managing information resources in the ongoing performance of their duties, including the DP 102 Information Management Policy This link is available only to clients with access to Publiservice, the GoC extranet..

Managing information resources throughout their life cycle and complying with federal legislation and departmental policies, directives, standards and guidelines regarding the management of information;

Maintaining audit trails by documenting activities and decisions, particularly with respect to electronic mail messages;

Supporting program development by identifying information resource requirements and issues to their manager and departmental IM and IT specialists;

Participating in training offered on information management, as appropriate, and

Using electronic systems for creating, using and managing records and information holdings.

7.8 Clients

Define roles and responsibilities of Clients;

Managing information resources throughout their life cycle and complying with federal legislation and departmental policies, directives, standards and guidelines regarding the management of information and:

Maintaining audit trails by documenting activities and decisions, particularly with respect to electronic mail messages.

7.9 Other Stakeholders

Define roles and responsibilities of other Stakeholders;

Managing information resources throughout their life cycle and complying with federal legislation and departmental policies, directives, standards and guidelines regarding the management of information and:

Maintaining audit trails by documenting activities and decisions, particularly with respect to electronic mail messages.

8. Appendix 3 - Definitions

8.1 Classification/Record Classification

The Departmental Subject File Classification Plan is a comprehensive and structured system used to organize and locate records throughout their life cycle. At PSPC, records are organized numerically under two main subject categories administrative and operational.

Note: Employees are not responsible for assigning numbers to records from different categories. For assistance in this area contact your Branch Record Centre or the Records Management Directorate This link is available only to clients with access to The Source, the PWGSC/PSPC intranet..

Data:
Data is a set of discrete facts about events. Most organizations capture significant amounts of data in highly structured databases such as Service Management and Configuration Management tools/systems and databases.
Document:
A document can be a word processing file, a spreadsheet, a project management schedule, a graphics file, a CAD or engineering drawing, paper scanned as an image, a slide show presentation, audio and even video, or any similar item that can be contained in an electronic file.
Information:
Information comes from providing context to data. Information is typically stored in semi-structured content such as documents, e-mail, and multimedia.
Knowledge Management:
The key Knowledge Management activity around information is managing the content in a way that makes it easy to capture, query, find, re-use and learn from experiences so that mistakes are not repeated and work is not duplicated.
Knowledge:
Knowledge is composed of the tacit experiences, ideas, insights, values and judgments of individuals. People gain knowledge both from their own and from their peers' expertise, as well as from the analysis of information (and data). Through the synthesis of these elements, new knowledge is created.
Metadata:
Data about data. Metadata describes how and when and by whom a particular set of data was collected, and how the data is formatted. Metadata is essential for understanding information stored in data warehouses (databases) and has become increasingly important to Web-based applications and sites.
Record:
A record includes any documentary material other than a publication, regardless of medium or form.
Transitory Records:
Records of temporary usefulness that are not an integral part of an administrative or operational record series, that are not regularly filed with standards records or filing systems, and that are only required for a limited period of time for the completion of a routine action or the preparation of an ongoing record.

9. Appendix 4 - Storage Medium

Table Summary

This table describes the file storage mediums and characteristics.

Storage Medium Characteristics
Shared Drives
(not recommended)
  • Easy to store and access files.
  • Familiar to everyone (no training required).
  • Backed up regularly.
  • Need to impose an organizational structure and ensure the documents are captured in a formal recordkeeping repository at some point in order that retention and disposition schedules can apply.
  • Need to ensure access/security restrictions are adequate.
  • Can cause difficulties when searching and retrieving documents if unstructured.
E-DRM
(departmental tool)
  • Requires license to store and retrieve files.
  • Provides version control.
  • Backed up regularly.
  • Documents are filed properly into the classification system with retention and disposition schedules applied automatically
  • Retrieving information is easy based on the classification system
  • Makes complying with Access to Information and Privacy requests simple.
Filing Cabinet
(used to store reference documents)
  • Provides paper based (not electronic) storage.
  • Can hold Protect B materiel if classified as a secure cabinet.
  • Corporate documentation should be filed into the recordkeeping repository.
  • If sole source of corporate information, can cause issues with regards to Access to Information and Privacy requests (i.e.: information may not be disclosed as appropriate).
  • If sole source of corporate information, knowledge transfer can be difficult - lack of a formal classification structure, interested parties do not necessarily know files exist, etc.
Databases
  • Used to house data captured from applications.
  • IT provides lifecycle support.
  • Lifecycle management rules need to apply (i.e.: classification and eventual disposition must be decided).