Section 2—The year in review—The Long Term Vision and Plan Annual Report 2014–15

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2.1 Context—previous work

The Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) is a guide for change to the Parliamentary Precinct which established the rehabilitation of the Parliamentary Triad (West Block, Centre Block, East Block) as the first priority. Since 2001, the LTVP has required the planning and delivery of a complex sequence of numerous inter-dependent projects and moves throughout the Parliamentary Precinct. This sequencing of projects and moves is needed to allow the Centre Block to be vacated.

The LTVP was updated in 2007 and significant progress has been made including the completion of 20 key projects, many of which have realized substantial time and cost savings. For example, Members of Parliament from the West Block have been relocated into renovated facilities in the Valour Building. This in turn triggered a series of earlier projects to relocate functions that previously occupied the Valour Building. A new food production facility was built, coming in 20% under budget, and 1 Wellington was converted into committee rooms, allowing West Block to be fully vacated in 2011, four years earlier than originally planned.

Figure 2.03 illustrates the LTVP timeline with key project milestones, and Figure 2.04 provides greater detail on the LTVP projects that have been completed, current priorities, and projects planned for the future.

Figure 2.01 – Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow table for currently approved projects

(in millions of dollars)
  Actual Forecast
Previous years Fiscal year 2013–14 Fiscal year 2014–15 Fiscal year 2015–16 Fiscal year 2016–17 Fiscal year 2017–18 and future years Total
Expenditures $1,139.52 $283.70 $355.91 $408.71 $415.36 $483.70 $3,086.90
Percentage of funding spent 36.9% 46.1% 57.6% 70.9% 84.3% 100% 100%

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.

Figure 2.02 – Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow
(in millions of dollars)

Figure 2.02 – Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.

Table equivalent of Figure 2.02 – Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars)
Year Amount Percentage Percentage spent to date
Previous years $1,423.22 46.1% 57.6%
Fiscal year 2014–15 $355.91 11.5%
Fiscal year 2015–16 $408.71 13.2% N/A
Fiscal year 2016–17 $415.36 13.5% N/A
Fiscal year 2017–18 and future years $483.70 15.7% N/A

Figure 2.03 – Construction completion milestone timeline

Figure 2.03 – Construction completion milestone timeline - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note: All future dates are forecast and subject to change.

Table equivalent of Figure 2.03 – Construction completion milestone timeline
Year Milestones
2010
  • Valour Building completion
  • Food Production Facility completion
  • Rideau committee rooms completion
2015
  • Sir John A. Macdonald completion
2016
  • Wellington Building completion
2017
  • West Block completion
  • Visitor Welcome Centre – phase 1  completion
2018
  • Government Conference Centre completion
2022
  • East Block 1867 Wing exterior rehabilitation completion
2028
  • Centre Block completion
  • Visitor Welcome Centre – phase 2 and 3 completion
2032
  • East Block completion

Figure 2.04 – Long Term Vision and Plan key projects

Figure 2.04 – Long Term Vision and Plan key projects - See image description below.

Image description

This figure indicates the key LTVP projects within the Parliamentary Precinct, which are categorized as follows: completed, current priorities and future priorities. Details are provided in the accompanying text. The scale is in metres.

Long Term Vision and Plan work completed
  1. Centre Block Underground Services (CBUS): Construction of an underground facility to house high-voltage electrical transformers and emergency power generators, advanced computers and communications facilities, storage space and delivery reception facilities.
  2. The Peace Tower: Restoration of exterior masonry to address deterioration.
  3. Library of Parliament: Full interior and exterior restoration of the heritage building and the addition of new below-grade space.
  4. Food Production Facility: Relocation and construction of an off-site food production facility to provide new state of the art facilities and make room for the development of the former site.
  5. The Valour Building (formerly La Promenade): Construction of offices for the interim relocation of Parliamentarians and space for three committee rooms.
  6. 1 Wellington (Rideau Committee Rooms): Construction of four new committee rooms.
  7. Sir John A. Macdonald Building: Construction of the permanent relocation site of the Confederation Room (Room 200) from the West Block.
Current priorities: Major Capital Program
  1. Wellington Building Renovation: Construction of offices for the interim relocation of Parliamentarians (70 Parliamentary Office Units and ten committee rooms).
  2. Visitor Welcome Centre, Phase 1: Construction of improved physical security systems and space to accommodate visitors on parliamentary business, provide indoor access for material handling and provide a modern visitor facility to communicate the operations and history of the Canadian Parliament. Will be used as access to the House of Commons Chamber in West Block during the Centre Block rehabilitation.
  3. West Block Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the interior and exterior of the heritage building for modern offices and committee rooms for Parliamentarians. Construction of a courtyard infill to contain the House of Commons Chamber during the rehabilitation of Centre Block.
  4. Government Conference Centre: Construction of Senate Chamber and offices for the interim relocation of Senators during the Centre Block rehabilitation.
Future priorities: Major Capital Program
  1. Centre Block Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the interior and exterior of the heritage building for modern offices and committee rooms for Parliamentarians.
  2. Visitor Welcome Centre Phases 2 & 3: Completion of the Visitors Welcome complex to interconnect with Phase 1 and construction of an East sector underground services structure to service material handling for Centre Block and East Block.
  3. East Block Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the interior and exterior of the heritage building to install modern offices for Senators.
  4. Confederation Building Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the interior and exterior of the heritage building for modern offices and committee rooms for Parliamentarians.
  5. 100 Wellington Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of the interior and exterior of the heritage building.

2.2 Long Term Vision and Plan program – fiscal year 2014–15

Substantial progress has been made this past fiscal year in advancing the LTVP and planning is well underway for future LTVP projects.

The rehabilitation of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building was concluded this fiscal year, and West Block—the first of the three main Parliamentary buildings to be rehabilitated—will be completed within the next two years, along with the Wellington Building. The Government Conference Centre will be completed in 2018. All three buildings will provide interim accommodations. Substantial pre–planning work for Centre Block has been completed, putting the tools in place to prepare for the major program of work required for this project. Work continues throughout the Precinct to preserve and maintain all of the Parliamentary buildings providing for safety and functionality.

Overall, the LTVP program, and its individual projects have progressed or been completed as planned and on target. The only exception is an exterior window recapitalization project at the Confederation Building that was delayed in the short-term due to the effects of severe winter weather.

Total LTVP expenditures in fiscal year 2014–15 were $355.9 million (M) bringing overall program expenditures to $1,779.1M as of March 31, 2015 as shown in Figure 2.06. This continued an upward trend that started in 2010 when large-scale construction work on the LTVP began. The 25% increase in total spending over fiscal year 2013–14 reflects the increasing maturity of the LTVP program and the concentration of rehabilitation and construction work currently underway, with many projects at peak implementation.

In fiscal year 2014–15, overall LTVP expenditures aligned with planned monthly budgets and forecasts, and at year-end actual expenditures represented 99.4% of forecasted expenditures. (Figure 2.05)

Figure 2.05 – Monthly Long Term Vision and Plan financial situation – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Budget
  • : Expenditures
  • : Forecast
Figure 2.05 – Monthly Long Term Vision and Plan financial situation – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) -  Text description of the chart in the table below.
Table equivalent of Figure 2.05 – Monthly Long Term Vision and Plan financial situation – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Month Budget Expenditures Forecast
April $329.4 $2.5 $355.2
May $327.5 $5.8 $345.1
June $329.4 $41.4 $345.5
July $329.4 $63.2 $349.9
August $329.4 $91.7 $359.2
September $355.7 $117.3 $360.7
October $355.7 $135.4 $366.2
November $358.0 $166.4 $361.4
December $358.0 $208.4 $356.5
January $358.0 $240.5 $356.6
February $358.0 $277.6 $356.8
March $358.0 $355.9 $358.1

Figure 2.06 – Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Total Expenditures
  • : Total Forecast
Figure 2.06 – Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.

Table equivalent of Figure 2.06 – Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Year Total expenditures Total forecast
Previous years $34.8 N/A
2001–02 $67.3 N/A
2002–03 $115.0 N/A
2003–04 $189.3 N/A
2004–05 $249.5 N/A
2005–06 $307.8 N/A
2006–07 $391.6 N/A
2007–08 $459.1 N/A
2008–09 $532.7 N/A
2009–10 $658.6 N/A
2010–11 $788.1 N/A
2011–12 $934.5 N/A
2012–13 $1,139.5 N/A
2013–14 $1,423.2 N/A
2014–15 $1,779.1 N/A
2015–16 N/A $2,187.8
2016–17 N/A $2,603.2
2017–18 N/A $2,972.8

2.3 Long Term Vision and Plan program delivery components

The LTVP is comprised of four programs: Major Capital Program (MCP), Recapitalization Program (RECAP), Building Components and Connectivity Program (BCC), and Planning. Expenditures for each component are shown in Figure 2.07. In fiscal year 2014–15, MCP represented (86.2%) of all LTVP expenditures, followed by BCC (5.5%), RECAP (5.3%), and Planning (3.0%).

Analysis of overall LTVP expenditures by cost category for fiscal year 2014–15, as represented in Figure 2.08, indicates that the largest LTVP cost is construction at 65.9% of total expenditures, followed by professional fees at 17.0%. Professional fees include third-party expenditures in the areas of business analysis, costing, scheduling, heritage, project management, construction management, and architecture and engineering—all of which are specialized skill sets engaged as required to ensure that projects have the right people, with the right skills, at the right time.

Looking forward, overall LTVP expenditures are planned to increase in the upcoming years as projects such as West Block, Wellington, and Government Conference Centre are completed, construction commences on the Centre Block Rehabilitation project, and the next “rolling” program of work is implemented. The planning and implementation of the LTVP Program has incorporated the upcoming Canada 150th anniversary celebrations (2017) and Parliamentary Precinct Branch (PPB) is committed to ensuring an environment on Parliament Hill that is conducive to these celebrations.

Figure 2.07 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Figure 2.07 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) -	Text description of the chart in the table below.
Table equivalent of Figure 2.07 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Program Expenditures Percentage
Building Components and Connectivity Program $19.44 5.5%
Recapitalization Program $18.81 5.3%
Planning Program $10.72 3.0%
Major Capital Program $306.94 86.2%

Figure 2.08 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Figure 2.08 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note:

  • BCC expenditure value represents both campus wide and individual project expenditures.
  • Total percentage equals 99.9% due to number rounding.
Table equivalent of Figure 2.08 – Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Category Expenditures Percentage
Construction $234.63 65.9%
Building Components and Connectivity $26.95 7.6%
Professional fees $60.56 17.0%
Other costs $3.02 0.8%
Leases $30.75 8.6%

Performance metrics

The 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities established targets that all Parliamentary Precinct rehabilitation and construction projects greater than $1 million be within 90% of their time, scope and budget targets in fiscal year 2014–15.

As shown in Figure 2.09, all MCP, RECAP, and BCC projects achieved their targets this fiscal year, illustrating PPB's strong project management capabilities and continued success in the delivery of capital projects. (Note: Planning is not included in this evaluation as they have no capital projects.)

Using these results as the basis for analysis, the performance of the LTVP program of work in fiscal year 2014–15 has exceeded its performance targets for the year.

Figure 2.09 – Long Term Vision and Plan performance measurement framework target success – fiscal year 2014–15

Figure 2.09 – Long Term Vision and Plan performance measurement framework target success – fiscal year 2014-15 - Text description of the chart in the table below.
Indicator for the Long Term Vision and Plan performance measurement framework target success – fiscal year 2014–15
Indicator Target Result
Percentage of Major Capital Program construction projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 100%
Percentage of Recapitalization Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 94%
Percentage of building Components and Connectivity projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 100%
Table equivalent of Figure 2.09 – Long Term Vision and Plan performance measurement framework target success – fiscal year 2014–15
Program Percentage – quarter 1 Percentage – quarter 2 Percentage – quarter 3 Percentage – quarter 4
Major Capital Program 100% 100% 100% 100%
Recapitalization Program 100% 88% 86% 100%
Building Components and Connectivity Program 100% 100% 100% 100%

Major Capital Program

In fiscal year 2014–15, MCP project expenditures were $306.9M, a 24% increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year, reflecting increased construction activity. (Figure 2.10)

Figure 2.10 – Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014– 2015
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Expenditures
  • : Forecast
Figure 2.10 - Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014- 2015 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note:

  • All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.
  • Forecast includes the Centre Block rehabilitation project commencing in fiscal year 2016–17.
Table equivalent of Figure 2.10 – Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014– 2015 (in millions of dollars)
Year Expenditures Forecast
Previous years $28.4 N/A
2001–02 $44.1 N/A
2002–03 $70.6 N/A
2003–04 $109.4 N/A
2004–05 $153.8 N/A
2005–06 $198.1 N/A
2006–07 $265.5 N/A
2007–08 $323.8 N/A
2008–09 $390.1 N/A
2009–10 $510.8 N/A
2010–11 $623.7 N/A
2011–12 $749.2 N/A
2012–13 $929.6 N/A
2013–14 $1,176.4 N/A
2014–15 $1,483.3 N/A
2015–16 N/A $1,833.2
2016–17 N/A $2,208.6
2017–18 N/A $2,568.3

In fiscal year 2014–15, all MCP projects were on time, on scope, on budget.

Looking ahead, total annual expenditures within the MCP program are currently expected to increase over the coming years as ongoing construction projects are completed in advance of the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the implementation of next “rolling” program of work.

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15:

Targets for fiscal year 2015–16:

Recapitalization Program

In fiscal year 2014–15, RECAP project expenditures were $18.8M, a 19% increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year, reflecting increased construction activity. (Figure 2.11)

Figure 2.11 – Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Expenditures
  • : Forecast
Figure 2.11 - Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.

Table equivalent of Figure 2.11 – Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Year Expenditures Forecast
Previous years $1.6 N/A
2001–02 $11.0 N/A
2002–03 $25.4 N/A
2003–04 $51.0 N/A
2004–05 $57.7 N/A
2005–06 $61.4 N/A
2006–07 $64.6 N/A
2007–08 $70.0 N/A
2008–09 $73.5 N/A
2009–10 $75.9 N/A
2010–11 $83.3 N/A
2011–12 $96.8 N/A
2012–13 $112.7 N/A
2013–14 $128.5 N/A
2014–15 $147.3 N/A
2015–16 N/A $173.3
2016–17 N/A $190.9
2017–18 N/A $193.7

In fiscal year 2014–15, all RECAP projects were on time, on scope, on budget, with the exception of one exterior window project that was delayed due to the effects of severe winter weather conditions.

Looking ahead, total annual expenditures within the Recapitalization Program are expected to remain steady over the coming years with the completion of current projects and implementation of the next “rolling” program of work.

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15:

Targets for fiscal year 2015–16:

Building Components and Connectivity Program

In fiscal year 2014–15, the BCC project expenditures were $19.4M, a 30% increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year, reflecting increased construction activity on major capital projects. (Figure 2.12)

Figure 2.12 – Long Term Vision and Plan Building Components and Connectivity program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Total Expenditures
  • : Total Forecast
Figure 2.12 – Long Term Vision and Plan Building Components and Connectivity program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change.

Table equivalent of Figure 2.12 – Long Term Vision and Plan Building Components and Connectivity program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Year Expenditures Forecast
Previous years $0.0 N/A
2001–02 $6.3 N/A
2002–03 $11.5 N/A
2003–04 $19.1 N/A
2004–05 $26.1 N/A
2005–06 $33.9 N/A
2006–07 $45.9 N/A
2007–08 $49.4 N/A
2008–09 $51.6 N/A
2009–10 $52.6 N/A
2010–11 $58.1 N/A
2011–12 $61.5 N/A
2012–13 $66.5 N/A
2013–14 $81.5 N/A
2014–15 $100.9 N/A
2015–16 N/A $117.3
2016–17 N/A $131.2
2017–18 N/A $131.7

In fiscal year 2014–15, all BCC projects were on time, on scope, on budget.

Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the BCC program are expected to increase over the coming years with the completion of current projects and implementation of the next “rolling” program of work which includes projects in support of the closure of the Centre Block.

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15:

Targets for fiscal year 2015–16:

Planning Program

In fiscal year 2014–15, Planning expenditures were $10.7M, a 76% increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year, as shown in Figure 2.13. This significant increase was due, in large part, to the pre-planning work associated with preparing the Centre Block rehabilitation project.

Figure 2.13 – Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15
(in millions of dollars)

Legend:

  • : Total Expenditures
  • : Total Forecast
Figure 2.13 - Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014-15 (in millions of dollars) - Text description of the chart in the table below.

Note:

  • All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are projections which are subject to change. 
  • Forecast includes the Centre Block rehabilitation project up to and including fiscal year 2015–16.
Table equivalent of Figure 2.13 – Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures and forecast – fiscal year 2014–15 (in millions of dollars)
Year Expenditures Forecast
Previous Years $4.8 N/A
2001–02 $5.8 N/A
2002–03 $7.5 N/A
2003–04 $9.8 N/A
2004–05 $11.8 N/A
2005–06 $14.4 N/A
2006–07 $15.6 N/A
2007–08 $16.0 N/A
2008–09 $17.5 N/A
2009–10 $19.3 N/A
2010–11 $23.0 N/A
2011–12 $26.9 N/A
2012–13 $30.8 N/A
2013–14 $36.9 N/A
2014–15 $47.6 N/A
2015–16 N/A $64.0
2016–17 N/A $72.4
2017–18 N/A $79.0

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15:

Targets for fiscal year 2015–16:

Program benefits

Job creation – It is expected that the six major crown projects (East Block, Government Conference Centre, Sir John A. Macdonald, Wellington Building, West Block, and Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1) will generate over 25,000 direct and indirect private sector jobs over the course of the work. These will be generated through contracts with small, medium and large companies.

Waste diversion – Limiting the amount of demolition material dumped in landfills is a key goal for all major crown projects. For example, the Sir John A. Macdonald Building, Wellington Building and West Block achieved diversion rates for demolition materials in excess of 90% respectively, far exceeding their targets of 80%.

Energy efficiency – Buildings within the Precinct will be considerably more energy efficient after rehabilitation. All heritage buildings are designed to 70% of Green Globes standard (Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver equivalent). Energy efficient measures incorporated into the buildings include high efficiency motors, heat recovery systems, green roofs, solar hot water panels, and new energy efficient windows.

Hazardous waste abatement – All LTVP rehabilitation projects include the removal of hazardous waste materials from the buildings. For example, over 5,800 tonnes of hazardous materials and contaminated building products such as plaster, terracotta brick, insulation, drywall, etc. have been removed from the Sir John A. Macdonald Building, Wellington Building and West Block.

Feature story—Sir John A. Macdonald Building

The completion of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building rehabilitation was a major accomplishment of the LTVP this fiscal year. The restoration of this award–winning, heritage building and the construction of a modern annex building demonstrates all that the LVTP vision and guiding principles seek to achieve: respectful heritage preservation; sensitive redevelopment; adaptive reuse of assets; innovative sustainable practices; and the responsible stewardship of resources.

Built in the 1930s by the Bank of Montreal and located immediately across from Parliament Hill, this monumental heritage building permanently replaces West Block's Confederation Room (Room 200). It provides dignified, functional space for ceremonial and parliamentary functions, as well as state–of–the art conference and meeting facilities. Adapting this aging bank building into a multipurpose, multimedia parliamentary facility that meets the functional, technological, and evolving security requirements of the 21st century was challenging. It required the full abatement of hazardous materials, structural and seismic upgrades, the replacement of all mechanical, electrical, plumbing and life safety systems, and the introduction of enhanced security features. A skilled project team developed innovative ways to ensure that the extensive interventions were integrated with minimal impact on the heritage character of the building.

As envisioned in the LTVP guiding principles, the new annex building is an inspired addition to the Capital's ceremonial route, respectful of the heritage building and a graceful partner to it. While the two components are united by the use of common materials and complementary scale, the new addition defers to the heritage building through its asymmetrical design and the inclusion of a two–storey, glass buffer space that provides a clear transition between the old and new buildings. The dialogue between old and new continues inside with unifying materials and a shared attention to detail and fine craftsmanship.

Throughout the project, the Parliamentary Precinct Branch was committed to incorporating sustainable building practices into the design, construction, and ongoing operations of the building. The new addition includes a green roof, which provides broader environmental benefits, as well as reduced energy demands for the building. A full range of energy saving features such as high efficiency motors, occupancy sensors for lighting, water saving systems, and new energy efficient windows were incorporated throughout, all of which contributed to the achievement of the Green Globes 70% target for heritage buildings (LEED Silver).

Thoughtful construction practices also meant that in excess of 90% of all clean demolition material was diverted from landfills. Limestone blocks saved from the old annex demolition were reused in the restoration; granite from tellers' counters was repurposed into the feature staircase of the new annex; and the exquisite Art Deco chandeliers in the main hall were restored and refitted with energy–saving light–emitting diode (LED) lighting. These measures are not only environmentally sound, they demonstrate a sensitivity and respect for the history of the building, the craftsmen who built it, and the quality materials used in its original construction.

Every aspect of the Sir John A. Macdonald project reflects the values and spirit contemplated in the LTVP's vision and guiding principles—from introducing change within the Precinct in a balanced way, to providing responsible stewardship of resources through sustainable practices and the on–time and on–budget delivery of the final building. It is a model for Precinct renewal, providing inspiration and setting the bar high for the remaining projects.

Feature story - Centre Block

As the centrepiece of Parliament Hill, Centre Block is the iconic image of Parliament for Canadians. It is home to the Senate of Canada, the House of Commons, and the Library of Parliament—the heart of Canadian democracy.

Construction of an ornate Gothic Revival building set in the midst of a thriving lumber town was a bold statement about nationhood and the future of Canada. After the disastrous fire of 1916, Centre Block was completely rebuilt during World War I, larger and more richly decorated with stonework, stained glass and carvings—all deeply instilled with national symbolism.

This renewal of Centre Block was also a statement about Canada—our history, our sacrifices, our achievements, and our dreams for the future. This national treasure requires renewal once again. With ongoing failures in antiquated systems, Centre Block is in critical need of complete repair and rehabilitation.

The rehabilitation of Centre Block is the largest and most complex project of the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP). Given the complexity and cost of this project—as well as its national significance—a systematic, thoughtful, and thorough planning approach is critical for the project's success. Crucial decisions are made during pre-planning on the nature and scope of the work and how it is to be executed. Challenges and opportunities are identified and options are analyzed in relationship to costs, schedules, quality, and risk.

In fiscal year 2014–15, the Centre Block project achieved a significant milestone, completing a comprehensive plan that included a broad set of technical and enabling studies. This work established a solid foundation for the overall project and prepared the way for its transfer to the Major Capital Program and the lead-up to the full rehabilitation, which is scheduled to begin after Centre Block is vacated in 2018.

Guided by the overarching values of the LTVP vision and guiding principles, an integrated project team— with representatives from Planning and Integration, Major Crown Projects, the Parliamentary Partners, the Canadian Conservation Institute, and Heritage Conservation Directorate, as well as other stakeholders—oversaw a robust program of work.

Technical studies

The team concluded a major structural report based upon extensive research of original Centre Block documentation, historic photos, and current information. Archaeological, geotechnical, and seismic studies were also completed.

Art and artifacts

In collaboration with the Parliamentary Partners, an extensive inventory of over 5,000 art, artifacts, and heritage assets within Centre Block was assembled, providing insight into the size, scope and condition of items to be relocated or protected in situ. Planning also began for the decommissioning and move-out from Centre Block.

Building system upgrades

The preliminary identification of accommodation requirements for Centre Block provided additional insight into the electrical, mechanical, life safety, structural, security, heritage conservation, and BCC upgrades that will be required. These emerging requirements contributed to an overall scope of work that includes a fully rehabilitated Centre Block (including the Peace Tower) and the construction of a separate but closely associated underground Visitor Welcome Centre Complex in front of Centre Block. This new underground facility will accommodate isolated security screening, an enhanced visitor interpretation centre, improved material handling capability, and overall building support services.

Project management

In compliance with PWGSC's National Project Management System (NPMS), the team concluded an ambitious plan to complete the Centre Block Rehabilitation project's statement of requirements, feasibility report, investment analysis report, preliminary project plan and project charter. In March 2015, the team commenced the Smart Procurement process for architectural and engineering and construction management services. This early industry engagement allows the government to leverage private sector experience and knowledge, facilitating better decision-making throughout the project and resulting in good value for money.

The tools are now in place to prepare for this major rehabilitation project. With interim accommodation facilities nearing completion and the comprehensive preplanning work providing sound direction for the work ahead, Centre Block is poised for renewal once again.

A renewed Centre Block that honours the history of the building, provides Parliamentarians with modern functional spaces, and offer visitors rich thoughtful experiences, will make a contemporary statement about Canada, its place in the 21st century, and the vision for the next 100 years.

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