Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

General FAQs on the CGSB and Standards - TOC

Q1. What is the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB)?

A1. The Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) is a federal government organization that offers client-centred, comprehensive standards development and conformity assessment services in support of the economic, regulatory, procurement, health, safety and environmental interests of our stakeholders - government, industry and consumers.

CGSB is an organization within Public Works and Government Services Canada. It offers standardization products and services, including standards development, product evaluation, certification and quality assessment.

CGSB is a member of Canada's National Standards System, and is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada The WWW icon indicates an external link as a standards-development, certification, and registration organization. CGSB supports the government's economic, regulatory, procurement, health and safety interests.

Q2. What is the work of CGSB?

A2. CGSB is an organization within Public Works and Government Services Canada. It offers standardization products and services, including standards development, product evaluation, certification and quality assessment.

Accredited by the Standards Council of Canada The WWW icon indicates an external link, the CGSB offers programs and services in Standards Development, Registration, and Certification and Qualification - Products and Services. Currently we are responsible for approximately 350 standards and specifications, as well as conformity assessment programs with over 500 customers world-wide.

Established in 1934, CGSB is a charter participant in the National Standards System of Canada.

Q.3 What is a standard?

A.3 A document, established by consensus and approved by a recognized body, that provides for common and repeated use, rules, guidelines or characteristics for activities or their results, aimed at achievement of the optimum degree of order in a given context.

Note : Standards should be based on the consolidated results of science, technology and experience, and aimed at the promotion of optimum community benefits.

Q.4 What is a National Standard of Canada?

A.4 A National Standard of Canada is a document approved by the Standards Council of Canada The WWW icon indicates an external link that contains requirements and definitions for a specific product or activity. A National Standard of Canada can be developed by CGSB or by another accredited Standards Development Organization.

The designation National Standard of Canada indicates that a standard is recognized as the official Canadian standard in a particular subject area or topic. Before a standard can become a national standard, it must be approved by the Standards Council of Canada The WWW icon indicates an external link, Canada's national accreditation body.

Inclusion of the abbreviation "CAN" in the prefix of the standard's reference number indicates that a particular standard has been designated a National Standard of Canada.

Approval as a National Standard of Canada, indicates that the development of that standard has met certain requirements, including that it has been:

  • Developed by consensus from a balanced committee of stakeholders;
  • Subjected to public scrutiny;
  • Published in both official languages;
  • Consistent with or incorporates existing international and pertinent foreign standards; and
  • Not act as a barrier to trade. National Standards of Canada may be developed in Canada or adopted from international standards, with or without changes.
Q.5 Why are standards important?

A.5 Standards play an important role in everyday life. They may establish size or shape or capacity of a product, process or system. They can specify performance of products or personnel. They also can define terms so that there is no misunderstanding among those using the standard.

Standards ensure consistency of vital features of goods and services, e.g. safety, interoperability. They help make the development, manufacturing and supply of goods and services more efficient, safer and cleaner. Standards make trade between countries easier and fairer and help safeguard users and consumers.

Q.6 Are standards mandatory or voluntary?

A.6 All National Standards of Canada are voluntary standards. However, some CGSB standards have become mandatory because they are referenced in regulation by a regulatory body or in procurement schemes.

A standard becomes law if a federal, provincial, or municipal government references it in legislation.

Q.7 Where can I find out what standards CGSB has published?

A.7 The list of standards that CGSB has published is available in our Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) catalogue.

Q.8 Where can I purchase CGSB standards?

A.8 CGSB standards can be purchased on the CGSB Purchase Standards.

FAQs on the Standards Development Process - TOC

Q.9 What is CGSB's role in the development of standards?

A.9 CGSB administers the standards development process by establishing and supporting balanced standards committees that represent producers, users, general interest and regulatory members, to arrive at voluntary consensus standards.

CGSB Standards Policy and Procedures Manual is followed in the development and maintenance of the voluntary consensus standards.

Q.10 Who can become a member of a CGSB standards committee?

A.10 All CGSB standards committee members are volunteers. Membership in a CGSB standards committee is open to any individual or organization that has a direct interest in the standards committee's decisions, an expressed interest in standards development and are able to make an active contribution. The precise composition of each standards committee depends on the subject of the standard under development, but generally includes producers, users, general interest and regulatory representatives.

A standards committee has two types of members: voting and information (non-voting). CGSB strives to ensure that the representation from each category is balanced to prevent any single group from dominating the standards committee's voting procedures.

Q.11 Who decides which standards committee members are voting or non-voting?

A.11 CGSB grants voting status to those members requesting it, provided that this measure preserves balanced representation from producer, user, general interest and regulatory groups while ensuring regional representation.

It is CGSB policy that, whenever possible, organizations rather than individuals hold voting memberships in its standards committees. CGSB strives to ensure that the voting membership of its standards committees represents Canadian national interests on trade, health and safety, and the environment.

Q.12 Who approves and promulgates the standard?

A.12 Approval of the technical elements of the standards is the responsibility of CGSB Standards Committees. Approval of the procedural elements of the standards is the responsibility of the CGSB Panel on Process Assurance. Approval of the standards as National Standards of Canada is the responsibility of the Standards Council of Canada The WWW icon indicates an external link.

Q.13 How is the standard approved?

A.13 A draft standard is provided in a ballot to the voting members of the responsible Standards Committee.

Approval of the draft standard by these voting members must be achieved by consensus.

Formal committee approval of the standard requires more than 50% of the members who are eligible to vote cast affirmative votes, and ⅔ of the votes cast are affirmative.

See The Standards Development Process at the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB).

Q.14 What does consensus mean?

A.14 Consensus is a general agreement, characterized by the absence of sustained opposition to substantial issues by any important part of the concerned interests and by a process seeking to take into account the views of all parties concerned and to reconcile any conflicting arguments.

Note 1: Consensus need not imply unanimity.

Note 2: The absence of sustained opposition is not intended to provide a 'veto' to any one party.

Q.15 Where can I get more information about how standards are developed?

A.15 The CGSB Standards Policy and Procedures Manual for the Development and Maintenance of Standards detail the requirements for the initiation, development, preparation, approval and maintenance of CGSB and National Standard of Canada standards.

Also see The Standards Development Process at the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB).

FAQ's on the Certification Program for the Federal Government procurement and materiel management community

Q.16 Is it possible to obtain an equivalency for a course?

A.16 It is possible to obtain a course equivalency for certain courses of the program training's curriculum:

  1. Candidates can obtain an equivalency if they have taken a course that has been pre-approved as a full equivalency. To receive an equivalency, candidates must only submit a copy of their course certificate or other proof of attendance.

or

  1. Candidates can obtain an equivalency if they can demonstrate that they possess the knowledge of the required course content though a similar course, relevant work experience or a combination of both. Candidates must submit the appropriate Request for Equivalency Form describing how their experience and/or additional training is equivalent to the course required by the program for evaluation purposes.
Q.17 Are there different types of pre-approved courses?

A.17 Yes there are two types of pre-approved courses, the full equivalency courses and the partial equivalency courses.

The full equivalency courses have been evaluated and recognized as having the same content of the required course of the program.

The partial equivalency courses have been evaluated and recognized as being very similar to the required course of the program but not covering all of the course content.

Q.18 Where can I consult the list of pre-approved courses?

A.18 The pre-approved courses, where applicable, are indicated in the lists of courses and equivalencies (Procurement and Materiel Management) under the course title.

Q.19 Do I have to submit a Request for Equivalency Form if I attended a pre-approved partial equivalency course?

A.19 Yes a Request for Equivalency Form must be completed if you attended a pre-approved partial equivalency course.

Q.20 Where can I obtain the Request for Equivalency forms?

A.20 You can download the Request for Equivalency forms in RTF format (Rich Text Format) from the lists of courses and equivalencies (Procurement and Materiel Management) under the course title.

Q.21 How do I complete the Request for Equivalency form?

A.21 Each form has two columns. The left-hand column gives information about the required course in procurement or materiel management: title, course code, duration, course objective and content. The right-hand column is blank for you to electronically fill in corresponding information about your requested equivalency.

You can describe a particular course or a combination of courses and projects or experience. Make sure your comparison adequately reflects the course content shown in the left-hand column.

Be clear and concise, keeping in mind that a number of functional specialists from the Review Panel will be evaluating your request. You may wish to have your supervisor or colleague review your request for feedback before submission.

Q.22 Where do I send my completed Request for Equivalency form?

A.22 You can send your completed Request for Equivalency form electronically to Personnel Certification Division ncr.acqb.dcp-pcd@tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

You can also send your completed Request for Equivalency form by fax at 819-956-5740 or by mail to:

Manager
Personnel Certification Division
Canadian General Standards Board
Place du Portage, Phase III, 6B1
Gatineau, Canada K1A 1G6