Archived – Section III: Analysis of programs and internal services—2015 to 2016 Departmental Performance Report

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Strategic outcome

Public Services and Procurement Canada's (PSPC) strategic outcome is to deliver high-quality central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

Programs

The following section describes PSPC's programs and planning highlights that supported our strategic outcome. It also includes an overview of the financial and human resources, the expected results, and the performance indicators and targets for each program.

Program 1.1: Acquisitions

This program provides federal organizations with procurement solutions such as specialized contracts, standing offers, supply arrangements, and memoranda of understanding for acquiring a broad range of goods and services, including construction services. This program delivers acquisitions and related common services using the smart procurement principles (early engagement, effective governance, independent advice, and benefits for Canadians) through an open, fair and transparent process to ensure best value to Canadians and the federal government.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

Modernizing procurement is one of PSPC's key priorities and a priority for the Government of Canada. Over the past year, great strides were made in making procurement processes more streamlined, efficient and strategic. Much has been accomplished in improving the procurement process, including through the expanded use of the smart procurement approach in a broader range of projects. In addition, lean approaches were applied to identify and eliminate those elements within a procurement process that are not adding value and that can help reduce procurement costs.

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC moved towards a more coordinated and strategic contracting approach for complex, high-risk, in-service defence procurements, that imposed rigour, promoted innovation through the use of incentives and built stronger business partnerships with industry. In-service defence procurements include all of the activities required to maintain and support military equipment, which represents over $2 billion in Canadian industry annual revenue. PSPC, the Department of National Defence and Innovation, Science and Economic Development worked collaboratively towards a tailored approach through the sustainment initiative, to meet the specific needs of each sustainment project. To this end, decision-making for each project was guided by four principles:

  1. performance
  2. value for money
  3. flexibility
  4. economic benefits

Three pilot projects are underway under this initiative to test new, tailored procurement approaches and to develop lessons learned and best practices.

PSPC launched the procurement process for a new e-procurement solution (EPS) to make it easier for clients to procure the goods and services they needed to deliver their programs, and to make it easier for suppliers to do business with the Government. In addition to supporting core contracting functions in a modern, e-business environment, such as e-tendering and e-bidding, the EPS will help the government improve business analytics and effectively monitor and manage the performance and qualification of suppliers.

This year, PSPC strove to improve service and meet client expectations. The Department developed an action plan to address issues identified by suppliers who participated in the federal procurement process. Examples of changes include a new flexible bid compliance process to avoid bids being rejected for minor administrative errors or omissions, and a simplified and standardized bid solicitation format that will reduce costs and the administrative burden on suppliers.

The Build in Canada Innovation Program helped Canadian businesses get their innovative products and services from the lab to the marketplace and helped reduce barriers for suppliers to do business with the federal government. For example, starting with the program's sixth call for proposals, companies are now able to submit their proposals any time during the year, as soon as their innovation is ready to be tested. In addition, Canadian innovators who have already received a Build in Canada Innovation Program contract are now able to sell their products or services to more than one federal organization for further testing. As of March 2016, 251 innovations were pre-qualified through the program and 75 contracts with a total contract value of over $32 million were awarded to Canadian businesses in 2015 to 2016 alone. To date, 28 federal organizations have participated in testing innovations.

PSPC continued to oversee the ongoing implementation of the Defence Procurement Strategy (DPS), working collaboratively with the Department of National Defence, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard as well as other partner departments. The Defence Procurement Strategy secretariat worked with partner departments to enable integrated and effective decision-making for defence and major Canadian coast guard procurements and in the implementation of key initiatives, all while respecting existing individual ministerial accountabilities and mandates.

There is no significant variance in actual spending over the planned spending.

The difference between planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents (FTE)s is mainly due to the transfer of resources to another branch due to a re-organization.

More about the Defence Procurement Strategy Secretariat

The DPS partner departments have progressed on several initiatives including:

Interdepartmental working groups have also been established to implement the export strategy and to advance work on streamlining defence procurement processes.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 1 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
151,339,610 151,339,610 155,042,770 151,557,532 217,922
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
1,777 1,712.34 (64.66)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Fair, open and transparent acquisition that provides best value to Canadians and is delivered effectively and efficiently to the satisfaction of the government and Canadians. Percentage of Government of Canada procurement value through PSPC procurement instruments (standing offers and supply arrangements). 15% 9%Footnote 2
Percentage of total contracted value awarded competitively. 70% 86%
Cost of general and customized procurement services per $100 of contracts awarded by PSPC annually. (Based on three-year average). $2.40 $2.00
Percentage of competitive processes using fairness monitors which are supported by finalized fairness monitoring (FM) reports. 100% 100%Footnote 3

Program 1.2: Accommodation and real property services

PSPC provides federal departments and agencies with affordable office and common use accommodation that supports the delivery of their programs and services. The Department acts as steward for various public works such as buildings, bridges and dams, and national treasures such as the Parliamentary Precinct and other heritage assets across Canada. PSPC also provides other federal departments, agencies, and the Parliament of Canada with responsive and cost-effective real property services.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC provided accommodation at the lowest possible cost for the Crown and Canadians maintained a higher than targeted result for delivering real property projects that were valued greater than $1 million on time, on scope and on budget. The overall cost per square meter () was higher than targeted as increases are based on the consumer price index. This typically represents an annual average market value increase between five and 10 dollars per .

Delivering workplace solutions that address the needs of our client departments is an important real property service. Part of workplace fit-up is the accreditation component. This accreditation measures a standard of excellence highlighting an office that is modern, sustainable, and connected where employees have a flexible and healthy work environment. In 2015 to 2016, PSPC completed 51 accredited workplace fit-up projects: 23 bronze, 21 silver and seven gold. This equals a total of 94,479  of accredited space that has reached this standard of excellence.

In order to make accessing real property services easier for our clients, PSPC led the development of national memoranda of understanding (MOU) with clients to allow them to contract directly with its private sector partners for their requirements. Forty-seven client departments signed an MOU by March 31, 2016.

In response to the mandate letter, the Department worked with federal partners to develop criteria to assess the suitability of federal property for repurposing as affordable housing. PSPC prepared an inventory of its buildings and lands appropriate for advancing this social infrastructure objective. Three properties (located in Baie-Sainte-Anne and Tide Head, New Brunswick; and Ucluelet, British Columbia) were transferred under the surplus federal real property for homelessness initiative. They will provide long-term housing for individuals or families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.

PSPC divested the Kingston Dry Dock, the Selkirk Shipyard, and two wharfs in keeping with our long-term divestiture strategy of surplus assets.

A sale-leaseback oversight framework was implemented to ensure consistent national management and support joint governance at various levels between the private sector landlords and PSPC. Sale-leaseback is the sale of Crown-owned buildings that we then lease back from the new owner, thus transferring to ultimately transfer capital risk to the private sector landlord saving the Government of Canada (GC) and taxpayers money in the long term. The office portfolio is largely commodity based and can be provided by the private sector.

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC advanced construction work on the Wellington Building, bringing it to substantial completion. As well, the Department made significant progress on construction work on the West Block, Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1, and the Government Conference Centre (formerly Ottawa Union Station). These projects are on time, on scope and on budget and will be completed by 2018, positioning the Department to initiate work on the Centre Block as planned.

With the receipt of accelerated infrastructure funding, PSPC awarded five contracts for a total of $53 million for infrastructure improvements on the Alaska Highway, in British Columbia, completing two projects to reconstruct and resurface sections of the highway. As well, of the six electrical safety and infrastructure projects underway at the Esquimalt Graving Dock, one was completed.

PSPC also managed the removal, off-site disposal and recycling of selected equipment and inventory as well as cleaned-up debris, soil, and materials in the experimental lakes area located near Kenora, Ontario. To reduce impacts to this environmentally sensitive area with no access roads, helicopters were used to transport people, equipment and materials to and from the sites.

PSPC leveraged its expertise and demonstrated its leadership by taking over the operations of the previous organization, Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation, in contaminated site remediation. The Department provided sound stewardship of approximately $32 million in environmental and human resource obligations.

Finally, a less known service provided by PSPC is the administration of the Payment in Lieu of Taxes Program that makes payments to Canadian municipalities to share the cost of local government for properties owned by federal departments and agencies. The Department resolved payment in lieu of taxes disputes with four municipalities.

The decrease in actual spending over the planned spending is primarily related to deferred fit-up projects, offset by additional work performed on the Alaska Highway, the Esquimalt Graving Dock and various engineering assets.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to the ongoing changes to the real property financial framework (fixed vs variable activities).

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 4 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
2,175,548,102 2,175,548,102 2,441,749,987 2,112,305,111 (63,242,991)
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
3,669.68 3,410.4 (259.28)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Federal organizations have affordable accommodation and facilities that meet Government standards. More efficient use of office space as measured by allocation per person. 18.4 /person 17.4 /person
Affordability of office space as measured by cost ($) per . $330/ $341.07/
Federal organizations and the Parliament of Canada receive responsive and cost-effective real property services. Percentage of all real property projects >$1 million that are on-time, on-budget, on-scope (average of on-time, on- budget and on-scope performance indicators). 90% 96%
A real property portfolio that maximizes economic benefit and minimizes short and long term liability. Percentage of vacant marketable Crown-owned office space. 3.5% 2.93%
Maintenance and recapitalization costs as a percentage of portfolio replacement cost. (facilities condition index). < 10% 9.23%

Program 1.3: Receiver General for Canada

This program manages the operations of the federal treasury, produces the Public Accounts, and maintains the Accounts of Canada. It provides federal departments with an optional departmental financial and materiel management system offering and bill payment services.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC achieved timely and efficient issuance of all government payments and the provision of central accounting reports. The Receiver General (RG) function is evolving in order to remain relevant and responsive, and to keep pace with the shift in Canadians' expectations in terms of electronic banking services, direct deposit and the availability of real time Government of Canada financial data.

The Department carried out mission critical functions. For example, the Department is responsible for managing the operations of the federal treasury through the issuance and settlement of more than 339 million federal and provincial payments. In 2015 to 2016, 291 million of those payments were issued to Canadians and businesses by direct deposit and 48 million by cheque. The Department also collected revenue for all government departments which resulted in an approximate cash flow of $2.2 trillion.

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC pursued service transformation in line with the PSPC Client Service Strategy. The review of the Receiver General service delivery and supporting systems has been initiated and efforts to ensure modern, best-in-class RG treasury functions will continue.

The Department also maintained the Accounts of Canada and produced the Public Accounts of Canada. PSPC also maintained the government's monthly statements of financial operations in compliance with the Financial Administration Act. In addition, it maintained the integrity of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, and provided sound financial management and transparent financial reporting to Canadian taxpayers.

The Department complied with sound business reporting practices, policies, regulations and procedures with respect to the Government's financial statements published in the Public Accounts. The Public Accounts were tabled in December 2015 due to the federal election and received an unmodified opinion from the Office of the Auditor General for the 17th consecutive year.

The Receiver General for Canada successfully participated in the implementation of the Open Government Action Plan 2.0. This year, eight additional public accounts, payment and revenue data sets were published, for a total of 23, which contributed to the advancement of the Government of Canada Open Government agenda.

The increase in actual spending over the planned spending is mainly related to the substantial increases in card acceptance as well as postage fees mostly related to the issuance of payments for the enhanced Universal Child Care Benefit Program.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to changes in staffing requirements.

In 2015 to 2016, the percentage of payments issued via direct deposit was 85.9%. While this increased from the previous year, it did not reach the target rate of 90%. This can be explained in part by the fact that enrolling for direct deposit remained optional. While the Receiver General and other Government departments and agencies encouraged recipients to enroll for direct deposit, and increased the awareness of Canadians on its advantages, Canadians wishing to receive their payments from the Government via cheque were entitled to do so.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 5 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
99,157,873 99,157,873 110,793,370 109,908,581 10,750,708
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
356 319 (37)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Timely and efficient issuance of all government payments, provision of deposit detail reports, and central accounting reports. Percentage of payments issued through direct deposit. 90% 85.9%
Public Accounts of Canada posted on the web within 24 hours of tabling in the House of Commons. 100% 100%
Average unit cost per payment. $0.33 $0.27
Percentage of Receiver General payments issued within established timeframes. 99.99% 99.99%

Program 1.4: Integrity programs and services

This program provides the government of Canada with high quality, timely and accessible specialized services and programs in support of sound, prudent and ethical management and operations.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

On July 3, 2015, PSPC implemented the new government-wide integrity regime to ensure that the Government conducts business with ethical suppliers in Canada and abroad. The regime was designed to ensure that procurement practices reflect public expectations, ensure highest ethical standards, and that the care and prudence is applied in the handling of public funds. A secure web portal was developed where PSPC branches and other government departments and agencies can submit their supplier verification requests and receive query results from the integrity database.

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC processed 22,595 integrity verification requests and 94,150 verification checks against the integrity database. To meet an increased demand of the verification requests, especially during the last quarter of the year, PSPC enhanced its efficiency and provided timely verification checks (processed 96% of checks within four hours). In addition, PSPC undertook numerous outreach activities to engage suppliers, industry associations, civil society organizations, and other key stakeholders on the integrity regime.

The Department improved security screening processing times by undertaking a performance-based review and identifying projects to streamline processes and stabilize legacy information technology systems. As a result, 71% of simple reliability screenings were processed within seven business days.

PSPC implemented a new virtual contact center for the contract security services, which decreased the average caller wait time from 12 to 5 minutes, despite an increase in call volume of 33% over the last year. In addition, training was provided to over 1,000 company security officers across Canada, and 15 webinars on specific topics to over 400 participants. Moreover, a new strategy for the acquisition of a new information technology solution was developed to address the needs of the service.

The Department continued with the implementation of the Enhanced Security Strategy (ESS) for the Controlled Goods Program, for which funding was provided in Budget 2016. A regulatory change package in support of ESS was developed and consultations were undertaken through the publication at Canada Gazette Part I.

PSPC collaborated with law enforcement agencies for the investigation and prosecution of individuals for offences under the Defence Production Act and the Controlled Goods Regulations. It also increased the engagement with industry associations and security partners to address heightened risks for unauthorized access to controlled goods in electronic format. In addition, specialized training sessions were held on cyber-security risks, threat and risk assessments, and interview techniques for inspectors.

PSPC supported, through the Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG), national, provincial and municipal law enforcement organizations and other government departments and agencies by providing expert forensic accounting services, including expert testimony, for criminal investigations, assisting clients to resolve a myriad of legal issues. In addition, the Department shared work and expertise cross-regionally, and promoted the expertise of the FAMG throughout government by contacting and making presentations to numerous departments, working on a pilot project with the Competition Bureau and increasing involvement in investigation and procurement reviews.

The increase in actual spending over the planned spending is primarily related to the additional funding received for the support and enhancements brought to the Controlled Goods Program.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to staffing actions that had yet to be concluded successfully at the end of the 2015 to 2016 fiscal year, which offset a temporary increase in the contingent workforce (casual, student) to address the contract and personnel security backlogs in the Contract Security Program.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to date 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
15,505,622 15,505,622 21,448,262 20,273,364 4,767,742
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
368 354 (14)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
High quality integrity programs and services that ensure government operations are carried out securely and with probity and integrity. Percentage of verification checks completed within two hours.Footnote 6 80% 93%

Program 1.5: Federal pay and pension administration

This program provides reliable central systems and processes for pay and pension administration to other federal organizations. Through our pay and pension services, PSPC ensures that federal government employees and pensioners are paid accurately and on time.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC maintained the integrity of the Public Service Superannuation Act (PSSA) and the recently transferred Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act (RCPMSA) pension administration. As well, with the Transformation of Pension Administration Project, the migration of the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act (CFSA) improves client service and increases alignment towards a common Government of Canada service standard and process. During the year, the Department met its service standards in the delivery of these pension services and payments.

PSPC migrated the Canadian Forces pension plan administration to the new pension infrastructure implemented by the Transformation of Pension Administration Initiative for the public service pension plan. The project completed testing for the first release which will involve transferring the administration of contributor accounts to the Government of Canada Pension Centre using the new pension solution. The project also conducted activities required to establish a new pension centre operated in the National Capital Area, transferring the Department of National Defence (DND) pension staff to the new centre in July 2016. In addition, the project completed design activities and continued development for the second and final release to be implemented by the end of 2016, which will migrate the administration of annuitant (retired plan member) accounts to the new pension solution.

PSPC continued with the implementation of the Transformation of Pay Administration Initiative, replacing the outdated pay system, streamlining business processes, consolidating pay services, and increasing efficiency. As a result of the implementation of Phoenix, a new interface for data feeds between the federal pay and pension systems has been put into effect.

In December 2015, the 550 employees (460 compensation advisors) in Public Service Pay Centre in Miramichi, New Brunswick (NB) were providing pay services to 96,000 employees from 46 organizations. Having completed the integration between Phoenix and the GCHR system, compensation advisors in the Pay Centre will soon be able to increase their workflow and within the coming year double the number of accounts that they can manage. As a result, the Pay Centre will be servicing 191,000 employees from the 46 organizations once Phoenix is fully implemented.

The new pay system roll-outs which had been planned for October and December 2015 were postponed to February and April 2016.

This major transformation encountered significant challenges. The Department is working with departments, unions and stakeholders to address and resolve any issues as they emerge.Footnote 7

In partnership with DND, project definition activities were initiated to determine if Phoenix would be used to provide pay services to both regular and reserve soldiers.

The increase in actual spending over the planned spending is mainly related to the implementation of the Transformation of Pay Administration Initiative.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to the Pay Modernization Project coming to a close in April 2016.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to date 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
114,163,435 114,163,435 137,618,499 128,954,893 14,791,458
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
1,861 1,773 (88)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Employees and retirees are paid accurately and on time through reliable and efficient central systems and processes. Timely and accurate processing of government payroll as per schedule. 100% 26 of 26 payrolls were administeredFootnote 8
Timely and accurate processing of pension payments as per schedule. 100% 100%
PSPC cost per account to administer pay systems and associated processes for all Government of Canada employees. $115 $108.44
Government of Canada-wide cost per account to administer pension. $174 $165.50
Transactions are processed in the pay system and payments are issued on time. Percentage of public service pay transactions processed by the Pay Centre within established timeframes. 95% 92.25%Footnote 9

Program 1.6: Linguistic management and services

This program defines the Translation Bureau of PSPC as a key component of the federal government's service delivery infrastructure. The Bureau is the sole internal linguistic services provider and offers translation, revision, interpretation and other linguistic services for Parliament, the judiciary, and federal departments and agencies. It is also the terminology authority within the federal government and has been mandated to develop terminology standards to ensure clear, uniform and quality communications within government. The Linguistic Management and Services Program is mandated under the Translation Bureau Act.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

Following a few years marked by an overall reduction of the demand for translation services, during which PSPC strove to modernize its processes, business volumes appeared to stabilize in 2015 to 2016, and the volume of translation delivered for departments increased by 6.8% compared to last year. Business volumes do fluctuate and the emergence of social media and new technology may impact future demand.

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC provided high quality and exemplary translation and interpretation services to Parliament and to federal departments and agencies on a 24 hours a day, seven days a week basis. It translated close to 332 million words for other departments and agencies and successfully managed deliverables in support of such projects as the production of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Reports, the new Government transition, the welcoming of Syrian refugees and the New Bridge for St. Lawrence Project, among other files. It also translated almost 28 million words for Parliament, offering services to 30 additional members of Parliament following the revision of the Canada Elections Act.

PSPC provided more than 2,550 interpreter-days for Parliament and delivered approximately 4,000 conference interpretation assignments for events such as the G7 and G20 summits. It also delivered over 2,500 visual interpretation assignments to support deaf and hard of hearing public servants. In addition, PSPC examined ways to offer remote interpretation services to reduce costs and encourage bilingual engagement.

PSPC rolled-out a language comprehension tool to six departments totaling 25,000 public servants, hence promoting the use of both official languages in the federal public service. Furthermore, in order to enhance the client experience and to allow federal departments and agencies to focus on their core mandates, the Department successfully piloted a new fully-managed service where PSPC's Translation Bureau took on responsibility for managing all of Environment Canada's linguistic services, including their external translation contracts. This generated additional revenue of $2.95 million and is testing a service delivery model which could be used with other clients. PSPC also implemented a new online client interface which simplifies the ordering process to improve client satisfaction.

In addition, to ensure client loyalty, PSPC reduced the prices of linguistic services to better align with the private sector, thus returning six million dollars in rebates to clients. It also reinforced its partnership with the private sector by outsourcing a larger portion of its volume and held regular industry representatives advisory panel meetings.

PSPC developed the prototype of a new interface for the Language Portal of Canada, which will feature an enhanced indigenous languages section, and launched a new, more user-friendly interface for TERMIUM Plus®, the Government of Canada's terminology and linguistic data bank. In order to promote a consistent use of terminology across the Government of Canada, PSPC's Translation Bureau also made more than 54,000 changes to update and add content to TERMIUM Plus® and produced lexicons on matters such as workplace mental health.

PSPC delivered on its promises, while also implementing initiatives to foster employee engagement: PSPC's Translation Bureau led an organization-wide engagement strategy in which senior management met close to 100% of employees, followed by its first ever Innovation Summit, attended by more than 200 employees. It also maintained its position as leader of the creation of a virtual workforce, having 30% of its employees working remotely.

The decrease in actual spending over the planned spending is primarily related to the fluctuation in demand from federal organizations for translation and interpretation services. It is also the result of a reduction in business volume from Parliament during the election period.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to the planned attrition not materialized during 2015 to 2016.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 10 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
60,913,368 60,913,368 60,754,093 51,299,267 (9,614,101)
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
1,165 1,197 32
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
The Government of Canada is able to operate in both official languages and to communicate with Canadians in the official language of their choice. Percentage of documents translated and revised for Parliament within the agreed-upon deadlines. 95% 96.7%
Percentage of clients satisfied with services provided by the Translation Bureau. 85% 87.4%
Cost per word for linguistic services.Footnote 11 $0.40 $0.39

Program 1.7: Specialized programs and services

This program provides federal organizations with high quality, timely and accessible specialized services and programs.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC provided guidance and consulted with partner departments to support them in reducing the overall environmental footprint of federal government operations. Through consultations, a greater understanding of the challenges facing departments was established and resulted in the development of a more flexible, results oriented approach.

The Department signed three number of departmental service agreements in 2015 to 2016 as a commitment to improve client service under the strategy and its engagement efforts with client departments and agencies. In addition, two service summits have been organized to foster improved engagement and collaboration with client departments and agencies.

PSPC supported client departments and agencies in the modernization of their data collection processes by successfully implementing the electronic revision of texts for publication inthe Canada Gazette and introducing tools to simplify the ability of client departments to effectively manage communication activities and track performance.

Through the provision of documents imaging services, the Department supported client departments and agencies in modernizing their data collection processes.

Initial usage statistics of the shared travel system demonstrates slow take-up due to low client satisfaction, usability constraint and product limitations.

In 2015 to 2016, a client usability study was conducted. The results, combined with annual client satisfaction observations were used to drive the product enhancements. This has resulted in 13% increase in user satisfaction this fiscal year.

PSPC continues to explore means to increase user satisfaction and expand business model to garner greater economies of scale for government business travel.

In addition, PSPC implemented new functionality for the My GCHR PeopleSoft 9.1 standard (with two major releases in April and October 2015) which was developed simultaneously with the onboarding of a number of Government of Canada's organizations. Approximately 39,000 federal employees were using the system as of March 31, 2016. Departments and agencies continued to be systematically engaged on their readiness to adopt My GCHR. Production support and maintenance to departments already on boarded to My GCHR were strengthened, ensuring that the system is reliable and that it meets the needs of users.

The decrease in actual spending over the planned spending is mainly related to a reduction in the number of advertising campaigns from the whole-of-government web-buy initiative.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to a wide range of factors across departmental activities such as shifts in governmental requirements, streamlining of program areas, and changes in client departments' business volume.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 12 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
29,617,191 29,617,191 31,228,075 24,537,710 (5,079,481)
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
455 479.65 24.65
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Federal organizations have access to quality services to improve the management, delivery and safeguard of selected government operations and/or assets while minimizing their impact on the environment. Percentage of clients satisfied with quality of services. 85% 82.5%
Percentage of sub-programs and services that meet their expected results including service levels or published standards. 100% 71.4%

Program 1.8: Procurement Ombudsman

This program, operating at arm's length from the government, reviews procurement practices across federal departments and agencies, investigates complaints from suppliers regarding the award and administration of contracts for goods and services, and ensures the provision of alternative dispute resolution services for existing contracts. This program helps to promote fairness, openness and transparency in the federal procurement process.

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

The 2015 to 2016 Annual Report of the Procurement Ombudsman provided Parliamentarians and Canadians with information on the Office of the Procurement Ombudsman's (OPO) mandate and services, as well as the results of OPO's activities in 2015 to 2016.

OPO provided an independent and neutral avenue to address supplier complaints regarding the award or administration of federal contracts. In 2015 to 2016, OPO received 52 written complaints, representing a 35% increase compared to the previous fiscal year.

In 2015 to 2016, OPO completed seven reviews of supplier complaints, the highest number completed in one fiscal year. The seven reviews and the resulting reports included one that had been launched the previous fiscal year, as well as the first ever report related to the review of a supplier complaint regarding the administration of a federal contract. Two additional reviews were launched in 2015 to 2016 and were carried over to 2016 to 2017.

OPO also offered dispute resolution services to suppliers and departments, and provided a timely, neutral and cost-effective alternative to potentially lengthy and expensive litigation. In 2015 to 2016, OPO received the highest number of requests for dispute resolution services within a fiscal year, and was able to help resolve the disputes in all instances where departments agreed to collaborate.

OPO reviewed the procurement practices of departments to assess their fairness, openness and transparency, and made recommendations for the improvement of those practices.

In 2015 to 2016, OPO launched two procurement practice reviews. The first is assessing bid evaluation processes, while the second is examining non-competitive contracting. Both reviews are exploring whether departments conducted activities consistent with applicable sections of the Financial Administration Act and regulations made under it, the Treasury Board Contracting Policy, and the principles of fairness, openness and transparency.

In addition, OPO assessed the response to recommendations contained in procurement practice reviews conducted in 2012 to 2013 involving the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS). The Office was encouraged by the fact that CSPS took action on all the recommendations and the associated action plans made in OPO's 2012 to 2013 reviews. The resulting report highlights the actions undertaken and planned by CSPS to improve the fairness, openness and transparency of its assessed procurement practices.

The Procurement Ombudsman retired in December 2015 and issued an End of Mandate Report, which outlined the Ombudsman's observations in the field of federal procurement at the end of his five-year mandate.

All reviews were completed and reported within the legislated timelines, and reports or summaries are available on the OPO website and in the 2015 to 2016 Annual Report.

The decrease in actual spending over the planned spending is primarily related to delays in staffing, as well as a decrease in outreach and advertising activities resulting from the election period.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to employee departures and delays in staffing processes.

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to date 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
4,111,325 4,111,325 4,101,959 3,830,009 (281,316)
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
26 25.14 (0.86)
Performance results
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Increased awareness of fairness, openness and transparency in federal procurement practices. Percentage of written complaints, requests for alternative dispute resolution services and procurement practice reviews addressed within the timelines stipulated in the Procurement Ombudsman Regulations. 100% 100%
Percentage of all inquiries and complaints addressed by the provision of information, facilitation and referrals to appropriate authorities. 100% 100%

Internal services

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided specifically to a program. The groups of activities are:

1.9.1 Management and oversight services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC supported the Minister and Deputy Minister in the development and stewardship of Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions and the management of parliamentary affairs, ensuring requirements from central agencies and parliamentarians were adhered to and subject to appropriate assessment and evaluation. The Department also ensured a successful transition to a new Minister and staff through the delivery of meaningful transition products.

PSPC established a results and delivery unit to lead the department's implementation of the new government-wide focus on results. The unit worked with business lines in PSPC to design tools to effectively monitor and report on progress toward mandate commitments and priorities. The unit worked closely with Privy Council Office, Treasury Board of Canada (TBS), and the interdepartmental community, to ensure alignment of approaches, share best practices, and support horizontal engagement on joint commitments and priorities

PSPC worked with four new organizations to smoothly integrate them into the Minister's portfolio and organized the annual meeting of federal/provincial/territorial Deputy Heads of Public Works and facilitated visits from international delegations.

In addition, PSPC established a dedicated secretariat within PSPC to support an independent review of Canada Post to ensure Canadians receive quality postal services at a reasonable price. Canadians from coast to coast will have a say in the services they value and need.

PSPC's Office of Greening Government Operations has worked closely with key federal partners to prepare the greening government elements of the 2016 to 2019 cycle of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and to renew whole-of-government efforts to reduce the impact of federal activities on climate change

PSPC ensured the protection of departmental personnel, information and assets through its corporate security and emergency preparedness functions. In 2015 to 2016, PSPC leveraged its extensive experience in emergency management to support operation Syrian refugees, in which it provided the Government operations centre with liaison officers.

During 2015 to 2016, the Office of Internal Disclosure was merged with the Special Investigations Division in order to increase efficiency by pooling resources and expertise. Through these two services, PSPC upheld the responsibility for administering the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA). Outreach programs were put in place to encourage public servants to report wrongdoing in the workplace without fear from reprisal. PSPC also had a significant presence on the government-wide internal disclosure working group where best practices are exchanged. The Department conducted administrative investigations and reviewed procurement award practices in response to allegations of wrongdoing.

The Department contributed to the integrity and effectiveness of departmental operations by delivering eleven independent and credible internal audits that provided reasonable assurance on the effectiveness and adequacy of risk management, controls and governance processes; delivered three neutral evaluations on the relevance and performance of departmental programs, policies and initiatives; and continued to play an important role in supporting the Deputy Minister's responsibilities as accounting officer.

1.9.2 Communications services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

PSPC provided external and internal communications strategic advice, support and services to the department's business lines and the senior executive offices (Deputies' and Minister's offices) and served as the focal point for the flow of strategic and operational communications to advance departmental and governmental priorities.

PSPC completed 75% of its web content rewrites and is on track to complete the remaining 25% before migration begins in the fall of 2016 to Canada.ca. The Department also expanded the use of innovative tools in social media through the use of Periscope and Facebook live to record and broadcast ministerial events live.

1.9.3 Legal services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC provided operational and administrative support to Counsels and the Senior General Counsel. The Department also provided paralegal support to Counsels and the Senior General Counsel.

1.9.4 Human resources management services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC embarked on an ambitious renewal initiative that encompassed several modernizations initiatives. Collectively, these efforts enhanced the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the Department in building and maintaining a capable, productive workforce while providing a safe, healthy workplace. In addition to modernizing systems and tools, the PSPC's renewal initiative aimed to redesign the organizational structure to better integrate and streamline functions for optimal client service.

Throughout the year, PSPC remained focused on strengthening workforce capacity to meet departmental needs and creating a sustainable healthy workplace to position the Department for the future. To support continuous improvement, a pulse check survey was conducted for all employees across the organization to share feedback regarding the Department's progress in addressing results from the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey. The results from the pulse check were used to establish or realign workplace strategies and priorities. The Department developed a comprehensive talent management guide with tools that focus on supporting managers and branches/regions with their talent management approach. Sessions were delivered across the Department starting in February 2016. PSPC also successfully managed the performance and talent management programs for the EX cadre and the respective review committees.

PSPC reviewed and redesigned its Staffing Program, in line with the Public Service Commission's new direction in staffing. The new PSPC Staffing Program aimed to maximize legislative flexibilities, minimize irritants and control measures, enable managers to exercise judgment/discretion in an environment of greater accountability, and support staffing advisors to become strategic business partners. Through its staffing reboot, the Department also removed inflexible, complex or outdated elements of the human resources (HR) management regime within the organization. This initiative explored innovative approaches and practices which decreased the overall "time to staff" while reinvigorating strategic discussions between HR advisors and hiring managers.

Committed to fostering workplace well-being, the Department created a new Workplace Well-Being Directorate, integrating employee and organizational assistance, informal conflict management, values and ethics and disability management. Of note, each branch/region has identified potential suitable positions for telework and the Department, through supporting tools and advice by Human Resources Branch, has begun to implement its telework action plan to increase engagement and productivity while saving on office space.

1.9.5 Financial management services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC provided strong financial leadership and oversight with the implementation of approved budget savings measures. It achieved significant accomplishments in financial management, improved efficiency of operations and leveraged technology to implement a digital signature and electronic approvals process. This supports a paperless workplace and increases automation of the procurement invoice to payment process. The Department also led robust and sound financial management via the implementation and reinforcement of a number of initiatives including the pay on time, budget management excellence, departmental investment management, chief financial officer attestation on cabinet submissions, and excellence in financial reporting.

1.9.6 Information management services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC maintained a very high compliance rate to respond to access to information (ATI) requests of 94.3% on time while fielding a 25% increase in volume, and consistently provided training and support for Policy on Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) liaison officers and employees in the Department.

The Department improved its management framework for protecting personal information by creating and appointing a chief privacy officer supported by a Director-General level Privacy Oversight Committee, instituting a new privacy breach protocol and developing its first Departmental Privacy Impact Assessment Plan.

PSPC also made significant improvements to information management by successfully implementing the records management component of the document and records management tool (GCdocs) deployment, which enables full lifecycle management of electronic information, as well as by meeting its paper holdings targets.

Under the Open Government Initiative, the Department produced 10 datasets for a total of 30 available on the Open Government Portal for public use. Four of our datasets were in the top 25 downloaded for all government datasets throughout the year. In addition, PSPC delivered its Open Government Implementation Plan in October 2015 which describes the Department's activities and deliverables to achieve compliance to the directive on Open Government.

1.9.7 Information technology services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC continued its department-wide service transformation agenda by operating with an open, transparent and standards-based model that ensures cost-effective and efficient information technology (IT) solutions that align IT investment decisions with departmental and Government of Canada priorities. The Department progressed in its departmental IT application portfolio by developing an action plan to address its legacy business applications. In addition, PSPC strengthened the governance structure to better support information management and information technology (IM/IT) investments.

PSPC worked collaboratively with partners to maximize the value of technology in support of the Government of Canada modernization initiatives. The Department demonstrated leadership in establishing and managing common business applications that allow other government departments and agencies to meet their legislative requirements, modernize their IT systems and decommission legacy systems. Shared efficiencies across multiple service lines have been achieved with the onboarding of federal departments and agencies on three IT modernization initiatives respectively for personnel management, document and records management, and case management and client relationship management.

1.9.8 Real property services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC delivered effective management of the Department's National Accommodation Program by focusing on the provision of a productive workplace while considering the wide range of services provided to departmental programs. The Department also ensured the optimal use of space and aligned its objectives with targets established in the federal budget.

Moreover, a project management office was created to support the delivery of the major departmental initiative to modernize PSPC space across Canada.

1.9.9 Materiel services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC reviewed each vehicle request and acquired vehicles that were fuel efficient in their class to achieve the fleet right-sizing goal.

Of the acquired vehicles, more than 66% were trucks that have a high fuel consumption rating which made it difficult to meet the targeted average rated fuel efficiency. These trucks were required to meet operational requirements. As new and improved vehicle technologies that provide better fuel consumption become available, the Department will purchase environmentally-friendly vehicles to the fullest extent possible, provided that they meet operational requirements.

In addition, PSPC disposed of assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner by implementing best practices and utilizing various programs that are ecologically certified.

1.9.10 Acquisition services

Program performance analysis and lessons learned

In 2015 to 2016, PSPC's Contracting and Procurement Division identified procurement strategies that would ensure fairness, openness and transparency. This allowed for the Departmental Procurement Plan to be developed and integrated within the Departmental Investment Plan.

The Department strengthened its internal procurement management framework and implemented it through enhanced communication, training and support to employees. The team also strengthened oversight and monitoring of procurement, particularly for low-dollar value transactions, through a robust quality assurance function.

Additionally, the Department established the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy with regards to green procurement and waste management targets. It also contributed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions for departmental fleet vehicles.

Financial and full-time equivalents variances for the program internal services

The increase in actual spending over the planned spending is mainly related to the increased workload stemming from government-wide information management and technology initiatives, in order to align with the new vision of modernization and transformation of the government.

The difference between planned and actual FTEs is mainly due to the following reasons:

Budgetary financial resources (in dollars)
2015 to 2016 Main estimates 2015 to 2016 planned spending 2015 to 2016 total authorities to dateFootnote 13 2015 to 2016 actual spending (authorities used) 2015 to 2016 difference (actual minus planned)
221,169,070 221,169,070 252,881,576 230,649,243 9,480,173
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2015 to 2016 planned 2015 to 2016 actual 2015 to 2016 difference
2,425.9 2,474.62 48.72

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