Archived – Section I: Organizational expenditure overview—2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities

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Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: Judy M. Foote

Institutional head: George Da Pont

Ministerial portfolio: Public Services and Procurement Canada

Enabling instrument(s): The Department of Public Works and Government Services Act establishes the Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1841

Other: The Minister of Public Services and Procurement has responsibilities under 19 other Acts. The most important ones are:

Organizational context

Raison d'être

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) plays an important role in the daily operations of the Government of Canada. It supports federal departments and agencies in the achievement of their mandated objectives as their central purchasing agent, real property manager, linguistic authority, treasurer, accountant, pay and pension administrator, and common service provider. The Department's vision is to excel in government operations, and our strategic outcome and mission is to deliver high-quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

PSPC is a leader in transforming its back-office. By enabling government-wide critical programs and services as well as delivering major transformation initiatives, the Department is helping the Government of Canada do business in line with the modern standards defining a renewed organization such as efficiency, effectiveness, connectivity and better value for clients and Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Department, founded in 1841, was instrumental in the building of our nation's canals, roads and bridges, the Houses of Parliament, post offices and federal buildings across the country.

The Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (the Act), passed in 1996, established the current Department and set out the legal authorities for PSPC's services. The Act established PSPC as a common service organization providing government departments, boards and agencies with support services for their programs that today include:

We employ over 12,500 permanent employees working in locations across Canada and headquartered in the National Capital Area.

As per the mandate letter to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, the Minister's overarching goal will be to ensure that the services provided by her portfolio are delivered efficiently, and in a way that makes citizens feel respected and valued. At the same time, the Minister will ensure that the government's internal services are held to an equally high standard and that procurement processes reflect modern best practices. The delivery of government services, including procurement practices, will reflect public expectations around transparent, open, and citizen-centered government and will serve the Government of Canada's policy goals of sustainable economic growth that grows the middle class.

Our goal is to manage our business in a way that demonstrates integrity, accountability, efficiency, transparency, and adds value for our client departments and agencies, and Canadians. In doing so, PSPC:

The portfolio of the Minister of Public Services and Procurement includes Shared Services Canada, which reports separately. It also includes three Crown corporations (Canada Lands Company Limited, Defence Construction Canada and Canada Post Corporation), two quasi-judicial bodies (Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal and Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board) and the Public Service Commission, an independent government agency. The Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) also reports to the Minister and operates independently. Details of the operations of the Crown corporations and OPO are provided in separate annual reports that are tabled in Parliament by the Minister.

Strategic outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

PSPC's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), as approved by the Treasury Board, supports our strategic outcome:

To deliver high-quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

The following table lists the programs that comprise PSPC's PAA in 2016–17.

PSPC Program Alignment Architecture
Program Sub-Program 
1.1 Acquisitions
  • 1.1.1 Acquisition stewardship
    • 1.1.1.1 Acquisition policy and strategic management
    • 1.1.1.2 Engagement with clients, suppliers, and small and medium enterprises
    • 1.1.1.3 Defence procurement strategy governance
  • 1.1.2 Procurement services
  • 1.1.3 Build in Canada Innovation Program
1.2 Accommodation management and real property services
  • 1.2.1 Federal accommodation
  • 1.2.2 Federal holdings
  • 1.2.3 Real property services
  • 1.2.4 Payments in lieu of taxes
  • 1.2.5 Parliamentary Precinct
  • 1.2.6 Cape Breton operations
1.3 Receiver General for Canada
  • 1.3.1 Stewardship of Consolidated Revenue Fund and Accounts of Canada
  • 1.3.2 Receiver General Services
1.4 Integrity programs and services
  • 1.4.1 Contract security
  • 1.4.2 Controlled goods
  • 1.4.3 Forensic accounting services
  • 1.4.4 Integrity framework
  • 1.4.5 Fairness monitoring and business dispute management
1.5 Federal pay and pension administration
  • 1.5.1 Pay
  • 1.5.2 Pension
1.6 Linguistic management and services
  • 1.6.1 Terminology standardization program
  • 1.6.2 Translation and other linguistic services
  • 1.6.3 Translation and interpretation to Parliament
  • 1.6.4 Conference interpretation
1.7 Specialized programs and services
  • 1.7.1 Greening of government operations
  • 1.7.2 Client Service Strategy
  • 1.7.3 Government information services
  • 1.7.4 Document imaging services
  • 1.7.5 Shared Travel Services
  • 1.7.6 Central relocation services
  • 1.7.7 Government of Canada administrative services
  • 1.7.8 Asset disposal
  • 1.7.9 Standards development and certification
1.8 Procurement OmbudsmanFootnote 1
  • 1.8.1 Review of procurement practices
  • 1.8.2 Supplier complaints
1.9 Internal Services
  • 1.9.1 Management and oversight
  • 1.9.2 Communications
  • 1.9.3 Legal
  • 1.9.4 Human resources management
  • 1.9.5 Financial management
  • 1.9.6 Information management
  • 1.9.7 Information technology
  • 1.9.8 Real property
  • 1.9.9 Materiel
  • 1.9.10 Acquisition

Contribution of priorities to strategic outcome

The Department has three organizational priorities that support the strategic outcome:

  1. Service excellence;
  2. Innovation and modernization; and
  3. Value for money.

These are described in the organizational priorities table and are also reflected in the program planning highlights in section II of this report.

Organizational priorities

The plans identified in the organizational priorities will enable us to focus on offering better service to clients and Canadians, promoting innovation, and achieving value for money.

Summary of progress—Priority 1: Service excellence

Priority Type Programs
Service excellence New
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation management and real property services
  • Integrity programs and services
  • Federal pay and pension administration
  • Linguistic management and services
  • Specialized programs and services
  • Internal services
Description

Manage the delivery of our programs and services to ensure excellence and integrity while managing our clients' and Canadians' expectations.

Why is this a priority?

As the Government of Canada's common service provider, providing excellent service to our clients and Canadians is fundamental to ensure departments and agencies effectively achieve their mandates as well as to bolster client satisfaction. We want to provide added-value to our clients by meeting their needs and exceeding their expectations for timeliness and quality. We also need to support federal government initiatives to improve service to clients as identified in the new Treasury Board Policy on Service and to support meeting the expectations outlined in Destination 2020.

Through its Client Service Strategy, the Department has, in recent years, been recreating itself as an integrated, innovative and service-oriented organization. The Strategy has broken down internal and external barriers, and solidified horizontal relationships resulting in improved service integration.

Moreover, every employee across the Department can and will contribute to service excellence by being empowered to identify and implement processes and approaches to better meet clients' needs and increase their satisfaction.

As we foster a culture of service excellence within the Department, we will continue to establish PSPC as a valued partner that departments and agencies turn to for its expertise and for the delivery of integrated, whole-of-government solutions.

What are the plans for meeting the priority?

In 2016–17, the Department will deliver on its top priorities as outlined in the Mandate Letter to the Minister of PSP, by working with other Departments and Agencies to implement the following priority activities which support "Service Excellence":

More specifically, for 2016–17, PSPC will implement the following initiatives that will contribute to the achievement of the "Service excellence" priority:

Service excellence Initiatives
Planned initiatives Start date End date Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Acquisitions
Determine how best to strengthen and expand social and sustainability policies into federal procurement by assessing current approaches against those used in other jurisdictions and best practices. April 2016 March 2017 Sub-Sub Program 1.1.1.1: Acquisition Policy and Strategic Management
Improve contract management and create a government-wide supplier performance regime through a review of procurement instruments, policies and practices. January 2016 December 2016 Sub-Sub Program 1.1.1.1: Acquisition Policy and Strategic Management
Move forward on transparency by making government information more accessible digitally and more open data available to suppliers and industry. November 2014 September 2016 Sub-Sub Program 1.1.1.2: Engagement with Clients, Suppliers, and Small and Medium Enterprises
Accommodation management and real property services
Support the government-wide efforts to conduct an inventory of all available federal lands and buildings that could be repurposed for affordable housing in communities. To be determined To be determined Program 1.2: Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
Support the government-wide efforts to resettle 25,000 refugees from Syria in the coming months. December 2015 December 2016 Program 1.2: Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
Continue the advancement of the Long Term Vision and Plan to rehabilitate the buildings in the Parliamentary Precinct and meet accommodation requirements specific for the Senate, the House of Commons, the Library of Parliament, and Parliament Protection Service. May 2001 (updated in 2007) To be determined Sub-Program 1.2.5: Parliamentary Precinct
Integrity programs and services
Streamline and simplify business processes within the Contract Security Program with existing information technology (IT) systems and technology. March 2015 March 2017 Sub-Program 1.4.1: Contract Security
Federal pay and pension administration
Continue optimization of pay administration following completion of the Modernization of Pay Administration project through:
  • Continued improvements to the operations of the Public Service Pay Centre in Miramichi, New Brunswick;
  • Updated processes and back-office structures to reflect a client-service focus; and
  • Initiated decommissioning of the legacy pay system.
December 2015 To be determined Sub-Program 1.5.1: Pay
Linguistic management and services
Explore ways to offer clients new efficient and innovative linguistic-service-related products and business lines, like remote interpretation, voice-to-text technology, the fully managed service approach and a simplified translation request interface. This will improve the client experience, enhance access to persons with disabilities and allow federal departments and agencies to focus on their core mandates. April 2015 March 2017

Sub-Program 1.6.2: Translation and Other Linguistic Services

Sub-Program 1.6.3: Translation and Interpretation to Parliament

Sub-Program 1.6.4: Conference Interpretation

Specialized programs and services
Continue to support departments and agencies to reduce the environmental footprint of federal government operations in response to the second cycle of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS 2013–16); To be determined To be determined Sub-Program 1.7.1: Greening of Government Operations
  • finalize Theme IV of the third cycle of the FSDS ( FSDS 2016–19); and
September 2015 October 2016 Sub-Program 1.7.1: Greening of Government Operations
  • report on government-wide progress.
November 2015 March 2016 Sub-Program 1.7.1: Greening of Government Operations
Continue to expand Document Imaging Services to support federal government departments and agencies in meeting information management policy requirements. This will be achieved by reducing the need to store large volumes of paper documents, thus enabling departments to improve their client service and reduce their operational costs. January 2014 To be determined Sub-Program 1.7.4: Document Imaging

Partner with client organizations to facilitate the roll-out, throughout the Government of Canada, of back-office systems such as:

January 2013
December 2015
December 2020
March 2019
Sub-program 1.7.7: Government of Canada Administrative Services

Internal services

Develop a stand-alone privacy program, distinct from the access to information component, to provide enhanced support to senior management on proactively managing privacy-related risks. December 2015 To be determined Sub-Program 1.9.6: Information Management
Continue to assist departments and agencies, including PSPC branches and regions, in procuring, implementing and operating innovative technologies that support client-centric service approaches that contribute to service operational efficiencies. April 2015 To be determined Sub-Program 1.9.7: Information Technology

Summary of progress–Priority 2: Innovation and modernization

Priority Type Programs
Innovation and modernization New
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity Programs and Services
  • Federal Pay and Pension Administration
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Specialized Programs and Services
  • Internal Services
Description

Implement new forms of program and service delivery to respond to changing needs of clients and Canadians.

Why is this a priority?

To keep pace in an ever-changing environment, support government priorities related to job creation and economic growth and support modernization initiatives such as Destination 2020, PSPC needs to implement new forms of program and service delivery, which will allow clients to reduce their costs and enhance their service offerings or service experience.

Our clients require integrated solutions that harness specialized knowledge, technology and modern approaches. We will continue to draw on our experience and expertise to improve existing processes and modernize our programs and find new and innovative ways to deliver our services, taking a whole of government approach. In doing so, we will expect to meet not only current but also future needs of our clients and Canadians.

What are the plans for meeting the priority?

In 2016–17, the Department will deliver on its top priorities as outlined in the Mandate Letter to the Minister of PSP, by working with other Departments and Agencies to implement the following priority activities which support "Innovation and Modernization":

More specifically, for 2016–17, PSPC will implement the following initiatives which contribute to the achievement of the "Innovation and modernization priority":

Innovation and modernization initiatives
Planned initiatives Start date End date Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Acquisitions
Work with the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to launch an open and transparent competition to replace the CF-18 fighter aircraft, focusing on options that match Canada's defence needs. January 2016 To be determined Sub-Program 1.1.2: Procurement Services
Work with National Defence and Innovation, Science and Economic Development to optimize performance and value for money in sustainment business by modernizing procurement practices through innovative approaches. November 2014 To be determined Sub-Program 1.1.1: Acquisition Stewardship
Prioritize the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy to support renewal of the Canadian Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Navy fleets. This will involve Public Quarterly Updates starting in March 2016 and an Annual Report to Parliament starting in December 2016. March 2016 To be determined Sub-Program 1.1.2: Procurement Services
Make further progress in the Acquisitions Program transformation with the aim of modernizing procurement practices so that they are simpler and less burdensome for clients and suppliers. This will start with Phase 1 of the e-procurement solution implementation. June 2016 June 2017 Sub-Program 1.1.1: Acquisition Stewardship
Accommodation management and real property services
Achieve space efficiencies and cost saving over and above what is possible with Workplace 2.0 by actively pursuing alternative work arrangements. April 1, 2012 To be determined Sub Program 1.2.1: Federal Accommodation
Continue to integrate the functions of Cape Breton Operations (formerly Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation) into departmental operations by 2016–17. This will be achieved through ongoing implementation of an integration plan focused on obligations related to environmental impacts of mining, post-employment benefits for former miners, and portfolio management and divestiture planning for the 4,000 hectare portfolio. June 2014 March 2017 Sub-program 1.2.6: Cape Breton Operations
Receiver General
Advance the Receiver General Modernization Initiative, designed to innovate the treasury and accounting processes, systems and services offered to client departments and Canadians as well as to ensure alignment with related work such as the Financial Management Transformation being undertaken by the Treasury Board Secretariat, by completing the planning stage and starting implementation. The modernization initiative will maintain the sustainability and integrity of the RG Control Framework, all the while streamlining processes. February 2012 To be determined Sub-Program 1.3.1: Receiver General
Integrity programs and services
Implement the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) requirement for mandatory fingerprints to replace the Criminal Record Name Check. May 2015 December 2016 Sub-Program 1.4.1: Contract Security
Implement new case management system for the Controlled Goods Program to support program change and improve service delivery. September 2014 December 2016 Sub-Program 1.4.2: Controlled Goods
Optimize the functioning of the database by transitioning the database from an access base to a web supported platform. 2014 To be determined Sub-Program 1.4.4: Integrity Framework
Federal pay and pension administration
Complete implementation and enhance functionality of the new pay system, Phoenix, which is replacing the outdated pay system, and permitting expanded self-service offerings. December 2012 March 2017 Sub-Program 1.5.1: Pay
Complete the Transformation of Pension Administration Initiative for the Canadian Armed Forces thus improving client service and increasing alignment to common Government of Canada pension administration services and standards, while decreasing the overall cost of pension administration. March 2012 December 2016 Sub-Program 1.5.2: Pension
Linguistic management and services
Offer an efficient and innovative enterprise solution to support the Public Service of Canada by deploying a machine translation tool on the desktop of all public servants to foster collaboration and promote the use of both official languages. June 2015 March 2017 Sub-Program 1.6.2: Translation and Other Linguistic Services
Specialized programs and services
Expand and promote e-services, where appropriate, through strategic and innovative investment strategies. Started with the Service Policy entering into effect, this initiative will come to an end with the completion of our current Service Management Strategy. October 2014 March 2018 Sub-program 1.7.2: Client Service Strategy
Implement a workflow management system which will allow the seamless tracking of documents throughout the Canada Gazette publication process. May 2015 December 2016 Sub-program 1.7.3: Government Information Services
Continue to rollout the new Government of Canada Enterprise solution for document imaging by onboarding more client departments. July 2015 March 2017 Sub-Program 1.7.4: Document Imaging Services
Enable the Procure-to-Pay initiative for automated invoice processing, through the Document Imaging Solutions Centre (DISC). To be determined August 2016 Sub-Program 1.7.4: Document Imaging Services
Provide innovative solutions to modernize Government of Canada Administrative Services and IT systems across government. January 2013 December 2020

Sub-program 1.7.5: Shared Travel Services

Sub-program 1.7.7: Government of Canada Administrative Services

Internal services
Transition the external PSPC website content to Canada.ca to meet the Government of Canada web renewal goal and improve overall web usability for Canadians. June 2015 December 2016 Sub-Program 1.9.2: Communications
Continue our efforts in modernizing Government of Canada administrative services and IT systems with the continuous transformation of our back office IM/IT applications to provide increased functionality, scalability and flexibility. April 2014 To be determined

Sub-program 1.9.6: Information Management

Sub-program 1.9.7: Information Technology

Continue to use enabling technologies to allow for increased mobility of our workforce to improve client service and delivery of our departmental programs and services. April 2014 To be determined Sub-program 1.9.7: Information Technology

Summary of progress—Priority 3: Value for money

Priority Type Programs
Value for money Ongoing
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Federal Pay and Pension Administration
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Procurement Ombudsman
  • Specialized Programs and Services
  • Internal Services
Description

Implement initiatives to increase efficiency and effectiveness of our programs and services.

Why is this a priority?

PSPC will continue to demonstrate to Canadians and parliamentarians that our programs and services provide value and demonstrate an optimal level of performance in meeting the program objectives.

To meet this priority, we will implement initiatives that reduce our costs, improve our timeliness, or increase our quality and relevance to our clients' and the federal government's needs.

What are the plans for meeting the priority?

In 2016–17, the Department will deliver on its top priorities as outlined in the Mandate Letter to the Minister of PSP, by working with other Departments and Agencies to implement the following priority activities which support "Value for money":

More specifically, for 2016–17, PSPC will implement the following initiatives which contribute to the achievement of the "Value for money priority":

Value for money initiatives
Planned initiatives Start date End date Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Acquisitions
Leverage private-sector experience and expertise for large public-private partnerships (P3) procurement projects to support the government's economic policy goals. This will start with the Champlain Bridge project. March 2014 December 2018 Sub-Program 1.1.2: Procurement Services
Deploy modern comptrollership through the implementation of the e-Procurement Solution to track and account for spending and leverage spend data for sound decision making. June 2016 June 2018 Sub-Program 1.1.1: Acquisition Stewardship
Accommodation management and real property services
Manage nationally a regionally implemented infrastructure program which will deliver $1.2 billion in projects to 13 other government departments as well as $174 million in PSPC projects. PSPC projects include key infrastructure repairs to Crown-owned engineering assets such as the Esquimalt Graving Dock, the Alaska Highway and the Alexandra Bridge, and $85 million in necessary repairs to federally-owned buildings across Canada. April 2015 March 2017 Sub Program 1.2.2: Federal Holdings

Sub Program 1.2.3: Real Property Services

Advance workplace improvements by applying the space standards modernization and space recapture initiatives, updating workspaces and enabling new technologies, as appropriate, to create a more efficient workplace and realize savings. April 2012 March 2019 Sub Program 1.2.1: Federal Accommodation
Receiver General for Canada
Further reduce the number of paper cheques issued by the Receiver General in favour of direct deposit which is a more secure, timely and cost-effective method of payment. April 2012 To be determined Sub-Program 1.3.1: Receiver General
Federal pay and pension administration
Implement LEAN practices within the Document Imaging Solutions Centre (DISC) in both our offices (Matane and Winnipeg) in order to improve processing efficiencies and therefore value for money. November 2015 To be determined Sub-Program 1.7.4: Document Imaging Services
Linguistic management and services
Continue to reduce the price of linguistic services for the Government of Canada through an optimal use of linguistic technologies, cost-containment measures, continuous improvement of systems and processes, and a greater partnership with the private sector in order to return efficiency and redundancy gains to client departments. April 2016 March 2017 Sub-Program 1.6.2: Translation and Other Linguistic Services
Specialized programs and services
Adopt LEAN Management principles aimed at reducing costs, improving quality and timeliness, improving usability and integrating service channels. Started with the Service Policy entering into effect, this initiative will come to an end with the completion of our current Service Management Strategy. October 2014 March 2018 Sub-program 1.7.2: Client Service Strategy
Enhance the efficiency of administrative services within the Government of Canada by taking advantage of economies of scale through common back-office systems [GCDOCSFootnote 2, My GCHR, Shared Case Management System (SCMS), and Shared Travel Services (STS)]. April 2012 December 2020

Sub-program 1.7.5: Shared Travel Services

Sub-program 1.7.7: Government of Canada Administrative Services

Procurement Ombudsman
The Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) will continue to provide value for money by delivering timely and effective dispute resolution services to Canadian businesses and federal departments as a means of resolving contract disputes and avoiding lengthy and costly litigation. 2008 To be determined Program 1.8: Procurement Ombudsman
Internal services
Provide sound financial leadership and oversight while ensuring value for money in delivering on departmental priorities. April 2015 To be determined Sub-Program 1.9.5: Financial Management
Enable new technologies to improve efficiencies of operations for the department, thus generating value for money. June 2015 June 2019 Sub-Program 1.9.5: Financial Management
Continue a cost-effective and sustainable IM/ IT environment that reduces the number of applications through the proactive management of the departmental Application Portfolio. April 2014 To be determined

Sub-Program 1.9.6: Information Management

Sub-Program 1.9.7: Information Technology

Continue a departmental-wide approach to the management of IM/ IT to ensure cost-effective and efficient IM/ IT solutions and services are in place and where IM/ IT investment decisions are aligned with departmental and Government of Canada priorities. April 2014 To be determined

Sub-Program 1.9.6: Information Management

Sub-Program 1.9.7: Information Technology

Lead the National Accommodation Program to provide modern, collaborative workspaces that ensure more efficient use of space. June 2015 March 2022 Sub-Program 1.9.8: Real Property
Enhance materiel management and accommodation practices in the Department to maximize resources and efficiencies. October 2015 June 2017

Sub-Program 1.9.9: Materiel

Sub-Program 1.9.10: Acquisition

For more information on organizational priorities, consult the Minister's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Risk analysis

Key risks
Risk Risk response strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Financial RiskPSPC's reliance on cost recovery poses risks in an environment of reduced expenditures on the part of client departments.

PSPC will adjust to reduced operational demands while maintaining the quality of its services.

This will include:

  • sustaining rigorous management of revenues, expenditures, forecasting and commitment monitoring; and
  • working closely with other departments through the client service network to identify changing requirements and their impacts on the Department.
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity Programs and Services
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Specialized Programs and Services
  • Internal Services
Complex, Transformational and Interdepartmental Major Projects and Procurements related Risk—There are inherent risks in PSPC undertaking and delivering complex, transformational and interdepartmental major projects and procurements on time, within the approved budget and according to scope (which could ultimately have an impact on the Department's service strategy). PSPC's risk responses include:
  • implementation of disciplined investment and project management processes;
  • development and implementation of service agreements and service standards with clear identification of responsibilities;
  • sound contract management; early engagement with client departments and other stakeholders; and
  • development and implementation of the Department's Integrated Investment Plan (IIP).
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity Programs and Services
  • Federal Pay and Pension Administration
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Specialized Programs and Services
Workforce Risk—There is a risk that PSPC may not have the ability to maintain a high-performing workforce with the appropriate skills and competencies to achieve the expected service delivery levels in support of evolving business needs. PSPC risk responses include:
  • Reinforcement of the integrated approach to business and HR planning, including in the context of transformation;
  • modernization of the HR management through new systems and approaches;
  • reinforcement and streamlining of internal processes to better meet clients' needs;
  • continued implementation of a departmental talent management approach and focusing on leadership excellence as a driver for people engagement; and
  • the building of an efficient workforce for the future.
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity Programs and Services
  • Federal Pay and Pension Administration
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Specialized Programs and Services
  • Internal Services
Managed Services Risk—There is a risk that PSPC may not always meet increasing client expectations and achieve the expected efficiencies and/or savings, or it may experience challenges maintaining service quality under the managed service approach in a context of reduced expenditures. PSPC risk response is to provide a balanced approach between meeting the needs of client departments and demonstrating sound stewardship of resources.
  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation Management and Real Property Services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity Programs and Services
  • Federal Pay and Pension Administration
  • Linguistic Management and Services
  • Specialized Programs and Services
  • Internal Services

Risk narrative

PSPC formally integrates risk into business planning, decision making and organizational processes to minimize negative impacts and maximize opportunities across its diverse range of services and operations. Risk management is conducted throughout PSPC in accordance with the TBS Framework for the Management of Risk, the PSPC Policy on Integrated Risk Management, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 31000 and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Implementation Guide to CAN/CSA-ISO 31000, Risk Management—Principles and Guidelines.

Financial RiskPSPC's reliance on cost recovery poses risks in an environment of reduced expenditures on the part of client departments. The Department will continue to implement a more robust Financial Management Framework, a more rigorous approach to manage revenues, expenditures and commitments, as well as a departmental client service strategy targeted at providing quality services to clients in the context of fluctuating business volumes.

Complex, Transformational and Interdepartmental Major Projects and Procurements related RiskPSPC's risk management approach in this regard will include:

Workforce RiskPSPC will continue to reinforce departmental strategies to effectively manage its work-force in a context of large and complex transformation, and ensure the required workforce is in place to deliver on the Department's mandate, including leadership development activities and a strengthened approach to talent management, including succession planning, as well as to develop strategies to foster a healthy work environment and continue to be an employer of choice.

PSPC will ensure the ongoing commitment to employment levels in Matane, Quebec through the Document Imaging Solutions Centre (DISC) expansion to include the Enterprise Solution and the set-up of the new Compensation Sector office. PSPC will also continue to offer alternative work arrangements by offering, amongst other things, telework to its employees.

PSPC will continue to support departmental strategies to effectively manage workforce adjustment activities, including maintaining regional operations throughout the transition from the Regional Pay System to Phoenix, as well as the activities stemming from the transfer of compensation services to Miramichi, and ensure the required workforce is in place to deliver the Department's mandate.

Managed Services Risk—As indicated in its Service Strategy (April 2015–18), PSPC responds to this risk by maintaining strong linkages and effective communications with clients, partners, suppliers and other stakeholders, and promoting PSPC's value-added services.

Planned expenditures

Budgetary financial resources (Planned spending-dollars)
  Total budgetary expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Planned spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Net Expenditures 2,870,459,398 2,870,459,398 2,757,885,279 2,184,945,096
Human resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
11,709.07 11,572.50 11,499.22

Strategic outcome: To deliver high quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

Budgetary planning summary for strategic outcome and programs (in dollars)
Strategic outcome(s), program(s) and internal services Expenditures
2013–14
Expenditures
2014–15
Forecast spending
2015–16
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Planned spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Acquisitions 152,781,604 144,689,521 140,954,475 148,255,037 148,255,037 155,238,902 115,302,842
Accommodation Management and Real Property Services 2,111,237,753 2,032,720,121 2,440,195,061 2,192,828,508 2,192,828,508 2,070,671,770 1,540,879,071
Receiver General for Canada 120,686,479 116,448,841 115,717,211 106,647,604 106,647,604 106,227,619 106,211,429
Integrity Programs and Services 0 22,035,911 18,512,980 15,184,073 15,184,073 15,184,073 15,184,073
Federal Pay and Pension Administration 101,211,263 115,698,499 137,218,342 81,761,681 81,761,681 83,952,459 80,274,545
Linguistic Management and Services 61,627,911 57,727,343 61,154,044 60,707,474 60,707,474 60,530,122 60,968,580
Specialized Programs and Services 56,443,732 47,133,036 44,157,717 29,454,041 29,454,041 30,059,862 30,136,298
Procurement Ombudsman 4,075,023 3,889,948 4,282,638 4,118,152 4,118,152 4,118,152 4,118,152
Strategic outcome subtotal 2,608,063,765 2,540,343,220 2,962,192,468 2,638,956,570 2,638,956,570 2,525,982,959 1,953,074,990
Internal Services Subtotal 239,060,369 226,820,291 249,962,317 231,502,828 231,502,828 231,902,320 231,870,106
Total 2,847,124,134 2,767,163,511 3,212,154,785 2,870,459,398 2,870,459,398 2,757,885,279 2,184,945,096

As part of the Report on Plans and Priorities, PSPC is informing parliamentarians and Canadians on how the Department plans to effectively deliver on its programs and services and in accordance with the Government's priorities. These measures are leading to an overall decrease in spending, which is explained in a more detailed view below:

2016–17 Main Estimates to 2015–16 Forecast Spending

The decrease of ($343 million) in 2016–17 Main Estimates ($2,870 million) over 2015–16 Forecast Spending ($3,212 million) is primarily related to the completion of:

The decrease was also the result of:

2016–17 to 2018–19 Planned Spending to 2016–17 Main Estimates

The decrease of ($686 million) in 2016–17 to 2018–19 Planned Spending ($2,185 million) over 2016–17 Main Estimates ($2,870 million) is primarily related to:

For additional information on past years expenditures, please consult the 2013–14 and 2014–15 Public Accounts of Canada.

Alignment of spending with the whole-of-government framework

2016–17 planned spending by whole-of-government-framework spending area (in dollars)
Strategic outcome Program Spending area Government of Canada outcome 2016–17 planned spending

High quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

1.1 Acquisitions Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 148,255,037
1.2 Accommodation Management and Real Property Services Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 2,192,828,508
1.3 Receiver General for Canada Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 106,647,604
1.4 Integrity Programs and Services Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 15,184,073
1.5 Federal Pay and Pension Administration Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 81,761,681
1.6 Linguistic Management and Services Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 60,707,474
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations. 29,454,041
1.8 Procurement Ombudsman Government Affairs A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government. 4,118,152
Total planned spending by spending area (in dollars)
Spending area Total planned spending
Economic Affairs 0
Social Affairs 0
International Affairs 0
Government Affairs 2,638,956,570

Departmental spending trend

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph - Text version below the graph

Text version

This bar graph illustrates the spending trend for Public Services and Procurement Canada for fiscal years 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18 and 2018–19. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y-axis (vertical), starting at $0, ending at $3.5 billion and increasing by $500 million. These are graphed against fiscal years 2013–14 to 2018–19 on the x-axis (horizontal).

There are three items identified for each fiscal year: sunset programs anticipated, voted spending and statutory spending.

In 2013–14, actual spending was $0 for sunset programs anticipated, $2,740,131,364 for voted items and $106,992,770 for statutory items. The total spending was $2,847,124,134.

In 2014–15, actual spending was $0 for sunset programs anticipated, $2,638,792,083 for voted items and $128,371,428 for statutory items. The total spending was $2,767,163,511.

In 2015–16, actual spending was $0 for sunset programs anticipated, $3,108,003,773 for voted items and $104,151,015 for statutory items. The total spending was $3,212,154,788.

In 2016–17, planned spending is $86,088,312 for sunset programs anticipated, $2,747,090,129 for voted items and $123,369,269 for statutory items. The total spending is $2,956,547,710.

In 2017–18, planned spending is $107,126,112 for sunset programs anticipated, $2,635,293,382 for voted items and $122,591,897 for statutory items. The total spending is $2,865,011,391.

In 2018–19, planned spending is $0 for sunset programs anticipated, $2,062,173,474 for voted items and $122,771,622 for statutory items. The total spending is $2,184,945,096.

The cause of the variances to the sunset programs is because:

For additional information on year-over-year variances, please consult the previous sub-section "Budgetary planning summary for strategic outcome and programs (in dollars)".

Estimates by vote

For information on PWGSC's organizational appropriations, please consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates publication.

Document navigation for "2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities"

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