Strategic outcome and program descriptions

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Department

Strategic Outcome 1

Reduction in poverty for those living in countries where Canada engages in international development.

Program 1.1 — Global engagement and strategic policy

Achieving international development outcomes requires engagement on the global stage and investments through international partners, as appropriate. Multilateral/international organizations and global initiatives tackle global problems (e.g., infectious diseases, climate change); provide a governance mechanism in areas such as humanitarian assistance or to set the development agenda (e.g., Millennium Development Goals); and provide economies of scale and of scope, as well as significant expertise and capacity on the ground. Activities under this program aim at delivering concrete results on the ground by: shaping and investing in multilateral and international institutions partners' policies and programs throughout the world; and, exerting policy influence to shape international development policy in Canada and globally, in line with the Government's priorities, in order to advance Canada's humanitarian and development assistance objectives through the fostering of effective partnerships and policy dialogue. Transfer payment programs over $5m in this program include International Development Assistance; International Financial Institutions (IFIs), as per the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act; and the Advance Market Commitment (AMC) for pneumococcal vaccine.

Program 1.2 — Low‑income countries

Countries within the World Bank low‑income category face pervasive poverty and limited institutional capacity, but have broadly stable governance and public security. These countries generally have a high level of aid dependency, limited resilience to respond to number of vulnerabilities and external shocks, and limited ability to attend to the human development needs of their populations. Programming under this program features long‑term engagement on country priorities, primarily to: strengthen education and health outcomes for children and youth; address the root causes of food insecurity; foster inclusive and sustainable economic growth; and, build the foundations for effective governance to ensure country institutions can sustain the benefits of development programs. The Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development works with other donors, civil society organizations and ministries of recipient governments. Engagement is anchored in the partner government's development strategy and program, around which donors coordinate and harmonize their efforts. This may involve the pooling of funds or other forms of program‑based approaches. Transfer payment programs over $5m in this program include International Development Assistance.

Program 1.3 — Fragile states and crisis‑affected communities

Fragile states and crisis‑affected communities face particularly severe development challenges exacerbated by conflict, instability, man‑made crisis or natural disasters within complex national and regional contexts. They have weak institutional capacity, poor governance, political instability, and ongoing violence or a legacy of past conflict. Canada's engagement is often whole‑of‑government and subject to closely monitored and visible government strategies. This program features programming that is short‑term to ensure delivery of, and access to, essential humanitarian services to crisis‑affected populations in order to reduce immediate vulnerabilities of the population. It also features programming that is medium to long‑term, to create conditions for sustainable economic growth and building the foundation for effective governance and delivery of basic services. It requires working with partners that have expertise and capacity to deliver in high‑risk environments. Transfer payment programs over $5m in this program include: International Development Assistance.

Program 1.4 — Middle‑income countries

Countries within the World Bank middle‑income category face specific challenges in inclusive, sustainable economic growth and development. These countries exhibit a stronger economic and social foundation and a lower reliance on aid than low‑income countries, but may still have a large proportion of their population facing inequality and poverty. These countries often have stark disparities along geographic, gender, ethnic, or urban‑rural lines, as well as pockets of deep poverty. This is in large part due to low productivity and competitiveness, and weak political accountability that does not address discrimination and marginalization. Main areas of programming under this program focus on delivering targeted technical assistance to foster equal access to economic opportunities and to public services to create the conditions for more competitive and inclusive local economies; to expand service delivery to reach marginalized groups; and to build accountable democratic institutions. It requires working in partnership with government, civil society and the private sector to build capacity including knowledge and systems. Transfer payment programs over $5m in this program include International Development Assistance.

Program 1.5 — Canadian engagement for development

The Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) achieves development results by focusing on purpose‑driven, cost‑effective initiatives that further the sustainability of Canada's efforts by drawing on the expertise, networks and opportunities available to Canadian organizations; and broadening Canadian engagement in international development through outreach and education activities. Programming under this program involves co‑investment in the most meritorious development proposals that align with Canada's development priorities. Through calls for proposals, DFATD is able to draw upon the Canadian organizations such as civil society organizations, academic institutions, and professional associations that are best suited to help deliver on Canada's development objectives. Canadian organizations in turn work with partner country counterparts to deliver development results on the ground.Transfer payment programs over $5m in this program include International Development Assistance.

Strategic Outcome 2

The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program 2.1 — Diplomacy and Advocacy

This program engages and influences international players and delivers international programs and diplomacy. It allows Canada to implement its international policies to foreign audiences inside and outside of Canada and thus fulfill the mandated roles and responsibilities that are associated with the diplomatic work of a foreign and international trade ministry. This work is done by liaising with decision makers at all levels in other countries and hosting events where key messages can be advocated. It includes utilizing provincial expertise in specific areas of interest to them to advance Canada's overall international policy. Additionally, it uses strategic promotion activities, including public diplomacy, as vehicles to promote Canadian views on issues of concern to Canadians and uses a number of discretionary grant and contribution programs to further Canada's interests abroad. The main target groups are foreign decision makers in Canada and abroad, foreign publics, other levels of government within Canada, key constituencies within other countries (e.g. security and defence‑related communities) and legislators.

Program 2.2 — International Policy Advice and Integration

This program provides strategic direction, intelligence and advice, including integration and coordination of Canada's foreign and international economic policies. It allows the department to plan and strategically coordinate its international activities with a view to integrating Canada's foreign and international economic policies. This is carried out by working to improve coordination within DFATD, with other government departments and relevant stakeholders, and by utilizing advice provided from missions to develop all‑of‑government approaches that integrate different organizational mandates and perspectives to advance Canadian interests and values. The main target groups are other government organizations, policy and program groups within DFATD, Heads of Mission and key mission personnel.

Strategic Outcome 3

The Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.

Program 3.1 — Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Service Delivery

This program governs, provides strategic direction and leadership, manages change, delivers services and provides infrastructure to the mission platform. The work is done in coordination with various branches, bureaus and divisions within DFATD and with over 30 federal and provincial departments and agencies located at missions abroad. The main target group is DFATD's branches, bureaus and divisions, the Government of Canada's missions abroad, as well as federal and other partners operating at missions abroad.

Program 3.2 — Government of Canada Benefits

This program is the vehicle through which the International Platform and central agencies manage whole‑of‑government statutory payments on behalf of the Crown. These payments are made on behalf of Canadian and local employees. DFATD manages the administration and payments for Foreign Service Directives as well as Locally Engaged Staff Pension Plans. This work is done through issuing timely benefit payments to Locally Engaged and to Canada‑based staff. The main target group is Government of Canada staff at missions abroad.

Strategic Outcome 4

Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.

Program 4.1 — International Commerce

This program manages and delivers commerce services and advice to Canadian business. It helps Canadian business succeed in international markets by providing expert counsel and advice and managing and delivering value‑added services to Canadian business pursuing international business opportunities. This work is conducted through support to qualified business clients. The main target groups are Canadian business clients who are currently operating abroad or who have demonstrated a capacity to do so.

Program 4.2 — Consular Services and Emergency Management

This program manages and delivers consular services and advice to Canadians, and provides a coordinated Government of Canada response to emergencies abroad affecting Canadians. This work is done through consular agents and officers at missions abroad and through the use of the website, Voyage.gc.ca. The program exists because Canadians travel, work, live, and die outside of Canada. This program prepares Canadians for international travel by informing them about safe travel habits and providing them with credible and timely information and advice to enable them to make responsible decisions about travel to foreign countries. In addition to helping Canadians prepare for international travel, this program assists Canadians outside Canada (24 hours a day, seven days a week) in handling individual cases of distress and routine requests for service and, in cooperation with partners and missions, provide a coordinated Government of Canada response to emergencies (such as natural disasters) affecting Canadians abroad. The main target groups are Canadians travelling outside of Canada or Canadians planning to travel or live abroad.

Strategic Outcome 5

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 5.1 — Internal services

The Internal services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Strategic Outcome 1

Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.

Program 1.1 — Defence

This consists of export sales in the aerospace, defence and security sectors. These include sales to all levels of government.

Program 1.2 — Emerging and Developing Markets

This is non‑Defence Production Sharing Agreement (DPSA) and non‑aerospace, defence and security business consisting of supply and construction projects in a variety of other sectors and can include sales to all levels of government, federal, state and municipal.

International Development Research Centre

Strategic Outcome 1

Stronger capacity in developing countries to research and propose solutions that support sustainable and equitable development and poverty reduction.

Program 1.1 — Research on Development Challenges

IDRC supports research in developing countries to promote growth and development. The challenges facing international development are varied and complex. Research and innovation are vitally important to grapple with these challenges. Under the Strategic Framework 2010‑2015, IDRC focuses on agriculture and the environment, science and innovation; social and economic policy; and health and health systems. Within each focus, programs define the specific development problem and identify the most promising approaches to address them. These programs support applied research as well as activities that strengthen the particular fields of knowledge. IDRC continually assesses why, where, and how to intervene to have the greatest impact. Program funding is allocated on an annual basis to reflect these changing priorities. IDRC works with researchers and innovators in the developing world, often in cooperation with researchers in Canada and elsewhere. Most projects are conducted by developing‑world institutions themselves, including universities, research organizations, and civil society. IDRC also encourages sharing this knowledge with policymakers, other researchers, and communities around the world. The result is innovative, lasting local solutions that aim to bring choice and change to those who need it most.

Program 1.2 — Capacity to Do, Use and Manage Research

IDRC also invests in research intended to assist the developing world to solve its own problems. To contribute to their societies, researchers and innovators in the developing world need to access global knowledge, engage their peers, and share their work. In short, they need opportunities to build their capacity to do, use and manage research. This program supports projects and technical assistance related to research design and methodology, communication and evaluation. Training and experts help researchers to develop their own ideas, communicate their results, and contribute to the larger efforts to reduce poverty. IDRC also works on evaluation methodologies and tools, and supports professional communities of evaluators in the developing world. This program works with research, media and evaluation professionals in the developing world. It does so using a "grants‑plus" approach to supporting research for development. This approach combines financial support to create new opportunities for research, engagement with recipients in the research process, and brokering that helps strengthen research‑to‑policy linkages. The work of IDRC is part of Canada's international assistance and is guided by the International Development Research Centre Act.

Strategic Outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1 — Internal services

The Internal services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)

Strategic Outcome 1

Prompt and effective prevention and/or resolution of potential disputes under the Boundary Water Treaty and Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement to ensure they have no negative impact on Canada‑US relations.

Program 1.1 — Boundary Waters Treaty

The issuing of Orders of Approval in response to applications for the use, obstruction or diversion of waters that flow along and/or across the boundary if such uses affect the natural water levels or flows on the other side; undertaking investigations of specific issues (references) when requested by governments; and the provision to make binding decisions on matters referred to it by the governments.

Program 1.2 — Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement

To evaluate progress toward restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

National Capital Commission

Strategic Outcome 1

Canada's Capital Region is of national significance and is a source of pride for Canadians.

Program 1.1 — Capital Stewardship and Protection

Through Capital Stewardship and Protection, the NCC aims to protect assets of national significance in Canada's Capital Region and to continue to enhance the Capital for future generations of Canadians. As steward of federal lands and assets in the region, the organization rehabilitates, manages, develops, maintains and safeguards the Capital's most treasured cultural, natural and heritage assets while ensuring safe, respectful and appropriate public access is maintained. The NCC also promotes and regulates public activities on federal lands and conserves natural resources through sound environmental management. Through its involvement in land development projects such as LeBreton Flats, its acquisition of national interest properties and its disposal of surplus properties, the NCC is further able to ensure that its vision for the Capital is reflected in Canada's Capital Region.

Program 1.2 — Capital Planning

The National Capital Commission (NCC) guides and coordinates the use of federal lands to ensure that they inspire Canadians, meet the needs of government and reflect the role and significance of the Capital. Through long‑term plans, the identification of a National Interest Land Mass (NILM) and review and approval processes, the NCC is able to ensure that land use in Canada's Capital Region reflects and respects the significance, natural environment, and heritage of the Capital. The organization also collaborates with federal, provincial and municipal governments on transportation issues.

Program 1.3 — Capital Experience

The objective of Capital Experience is to generate pride through programming and other services in the Capital. This program produces a series of high‑profile events and festivals (e.g. Canada Day and Winterlude), commemorations, interpretation, educational programs, visitor and recreational services and programs. In addition, through outreach activities that bring the Capital to Canadians across the country and national messaging, the NCC works toward increasing awareness of Canada's Capital Region as a place where Canadian heritage, culture and achievements can be experienced.

Strategic Outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1 — Internal services

The Internal services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

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