Strategic outcome and program descriptions

Public Accounts of Canada 2017 Volume II - Top of the page Navigation

Department of Health

Strategic outcome 1

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Program 1.1: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit

Under the Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit program, the Non Insured Health Benefits Program provides registered First Nations and recognized Inuit residents in Canada with a specified range of medically necessary health related goods and services, which are not otherwise provided to eligible clients through other private or provincial/territorial programs. Non Insured Health Benefits include: pharmaceuticals; medical supplies and equipment; dental care; vision care; short term crisis intervention mental health counselling; and, medical transportation to access medically required health services not available on reserve or in the community of residence. The Non Insured Health Benefits Program also pays health premiums on behalf of eligible clients in British Columbia (as of July 2013, Non Insured Health Benefits will no longer pay premiums for First Nations residents of British Columbia, who will become clients of the First Nations Health Authority in accordance with the British Columbia Tripartite Health Agreement and sub agreements). Benefits are delivered through registered, private sector health benefits providers (e.g., pharmacists and dentists) and funded through Non Insured Health Benefits' electronic claims processing system or through regional offices. Some benefits are also delivered via contribution agreements with First Nations and Inuit organizations and the territorial governments in Nunavut and Northwest Territories. The program objective is to provide benefits in a manner that contributes to the improved health status of First Nations and Inuit. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits.

Program 1.2: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

The Department of Health Act 1996, and the Indian Health Policy (1979) provide the authority for the delivery of the First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care program to First Nations and Inuit in Canada. Primary health care includes health promotion and disease prevention, public health protection (including surveillance), and primary care (where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services). The department administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending related to child development, mental wellness and healthy living, communicable disease control and management, environmental health, clinical and client care, as well as home and community care. The program objective is to improve the health and safety of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities.

Program 1.3: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit

The Department of Health Act 1996, and the Indian Health Policy (1979) provide the authority for the Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit program to administer contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support the delivery of health programs and services. The program promotes First Nation and Inuit capacity to design, manage, deliver, and evaluate health programs and services. To better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities this program also supports: innovation in health program and service delivery; health governance partnerships between Health Canada, the provinces, and First Nation and provincial health services; and, improved integration of First Nation and provincial health services. The program objective is to help improve the health status of First Nations and Inuit people, to become comparable to that of the Canadian population over the long term. The program objective is to help improve First Nations and Inuit capacity to influence and/or control the delivery of health programs and services to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities.

Strategic outcome 2

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Program 2.1: Health Products

The Department of Health Act, and the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations provide the authority for Health Canada to develop, maintain, and implement a regulatory framework associated with a broad range of health products that affect the everyday lives of Canadians, including pharmaceutical drugs, biologics and radiopharmaceuticals, medical devices, and natural health products. Health Canada verifies that the regulatory requirements for the safety, quality, and efficacy of health products are met through risk assessments, including monitoring and surveillance, compliance, and enforcement activities. In addition, Health Canada provides evidence-based, authoritative information to Canadians and key stakeholders, including health professionals such as physicians, pharmacists and natural health practitioners, to enable them to make informed decisions. The program objective is to ensure that health products are safe, effective, and of high quality for Canadians.

Program 2.2: Substance Use and Abuse

Under the authority of several Acts, the Substance Use and Abuse program regulates tobacco products and controlled substances. Through the Tobacco Act and its regulations the program regulates the manufacture, sale, labelling and promotion of tobacco products. The program leads the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, the goal of which is to further reduce the prevalence of smoking through regulatory, programming, educational and enforcement activities. Through the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations, the program regulates access to controlled substances and precursor chemicals to support their legitimate use and minimize the risk of diversion for illicit use. As a partner department under the National Anti-Drug Strategy, the program supports prevention, health promotion, treatment initiatives, and enforcement with the goal of reducing substance use and abuse, including prescription drug abuse. In addition, the program provides timely, evidence-based information to key stakeholders including, but not limited to, law enforcement agencies, health professionals, provincial and territorial governments and Canadians. The program objective is to manage risks to the health of Canadians associated with the use of tobacco products, and the illicit use of controlled substances and precursor chemicals.

Program 2.3: Environmental Risks to Health

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 and the Department of Health Act provide the authorities for the Environmental Risks to Health program to assess and manage the health risks associated with climate change, air quality, drinking water quality, and new and existing substances. This program links closely with Health Canada's Health Products, Food Safety and Nutrition, Consumer Product Safety and Pesticides program, as the Food and Drugs Act, the Pest Control Products Act, and the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act provide the authority to manage the health risks associated with substances in products in the purview of these programs. Key activities include: risk assessment and management as well as research and bio-monitoring of substances; provision of technical support for chemical emergencies that require a coordinated federal response; development of guidelines on indoor and outdoor air quality; development and dissemination of water quality guidelines; and provision of expert support related to environmental assessments and contaminated sites. The program objective is to protect the health of Canadians through the assessment and management of health risks associated with environmental contaminants, particularly substances, and to provide expert advice and guidelines to Canadians and government partners on the health impacts of environmental factors such as air and water contaminants and a changing climate.

Program 2.4: Food Safety and Nutrition

The Department of Health Act and the Food and Drugs Act provide the authority for Health Canada to develop, maintain, and implement a regulatory framework associated with the safety and nutritional quality of food. Food safety standards are enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Health Canada develops and promotes evidence-based, national healthy eating policies and standards for Canadians and key stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, health professionals, and industry associations to enable all stakeholders to make informed decisions about food and nutrition safety as well as healthy eating. The program objectives are to manage risks to the health and safety of Canadians associated with food and its consumption, and to enable Canadians to make informed decisions about healthy eating.

Program 2.5: Pesticides

The Pest Control Products Act provides Health Canada with the authority to regulate and register pesticides, under the Pesticides program. In the delivery of this program, Health Canada conducts activities that span the lifecycle of a pesticide, including: product assessment for health and environmental risks and product value; risk management; post market surveillance, compliance and enforcement; changes in use, cancellation, or phase out of products that do not meet current standards; and, consultations and public awareness building. Health Canada is also an active partner in international efforts (e.g., North American Free Trade Agreement; Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Regulatory Cooperation Council) to align regulatory approaches. These engagements provide access to the best science available to support regulatory decisions and promote consistency in the assessment of pesticides. The program objective is to protect the health and safety of Canadians relating to the use of pesticides.

Program 2.6: Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials

The Consumer Product Safety and Workplace Hazardous Materials programs support efforts to protect Canadians from unsafe products and chemicals. The Consumer Product Safety program supports industry's responsibility for the safety of their products under the authorities of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act and the Food and Drugs Act and its Cosmetic Regulations. In addition, the program supports consumers' responsibility to make informed decisions about product purchase and use. Health Canada's efforts are focused in three areas: active prevention; targeted oversight; and, rapid response. The Hazardous Products Act and the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act provide the authorities for the Workplace Hazardous Materials program to maintain a national hazard communication standard of cautionary labelling and safety data sheets for hazardous chemicals supplied for use in Canadian workplaces and to protect related confidential business information. The objectives of the programs are to identify, assess, manage and communicate health or safety risks to Canadians associated with consumer products and cosmetics, as well as to communicate the hazards of workplace materials.

Program 2.7: Radiation Protection

The Department of Health Act, the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Implementation Act provide the authority for the Radiation Protection program to monitor, regulate, advise, and report on exposure to radiation that occurs both naturally and from man-made sources. In addition, the program is licensed under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act to deliver the National Dosimetry Service, which provides occupational radiation monitoring services. The key components of the program are environmental and occupational radiation monitoring, management of inter-organisational plans, procedures, capabilities and committees for a nuclear emergency that requires a coordinated federal response, delivering a national radon outreach program, and regulation of radiation emitting devices. The program objective is to inform and advise other Canadian government departments, collaborate with international partners, and inform Canadians about the health risks associated with radiation, and strategies to manage associated risks.

Strategic outcome 3

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Program 3.1: Canadian Health System Policy

The Canadian Health System Policy program provides strategic policy advice, research, and analysis to support decision-making on health care system issues, as well as program support to provinces and territories, partners, and stakeholders on health care system priorities. Mindful of equity, sustainability, and affordability Health Canada collaborates and targets its efforts in order to support improvements to the health care system such as improved access, quality, and integration of health care services. Through the management of grants and contributions agreements with key pan-Canadian health partners, the Canadian Health System Policy program contributes to priority health issues requiring national leadership and strong partnership. The program objective is to support improvement in the health care system to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

Program 3.2: Official Language Minority Community Development

The Official Language Minority Community Development program involves the administration of Health Canada's responsibilities under Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. This Act commits the federal government to enhancing the vitality of official language minority communities and fostering the full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society. This program includes: consulting with Canada's official language minority communities on a regular basis; supporting and enabling the delivery of contribution programs and services for official language minority communities; reporting to Parliament and Canadians on Health Canada's achievements under Section 41; and, coordinating Health Canada's activities and awareness in engaging and responding to the health needs of official language minority communities. The program objectives are to improve access to health services in the minority official language communities and to increase the use of both official languages in the provision of health care services. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

Program 3.3: Specialized Health Services

The Specialized Health Services program supports the Government of Canada's obligation to protect the health and safety of its employees and the health of visiting dignitaries. Health Canada delivers counselling, organizational development and critical incident support services to federal government departments through a network of contracted mental health professionals and also provides immediate response to employees following traumatic incidents in the workplace. Health Canada delivers occupational health and occupational hygiene consultative services to ensure that public servants meet medical requirements to safely and effectively perform their duties and to prevent work-related illness and injury. Health Canada pro-actively contributes to reducing the number of work days lost to illness across the federal government through the provision of the occupational and psycho social health services to federal public servants. Health Canada also arranges for the provision of health services for Internationally Protected Persons who have come to Canada for international events, such as meetings or official visits by government leaders or the Royal Family. An Internationally Protected Persons is a representative of a State, usually Heads of State and/or Government, members of the Royal Family, or officials of an international organisation of an intergovernmental character. The program objective is to ensure continuity of services and the occupational health of federal public servants who can deliver results to Canadians in all circumstances and to arrange health services for Internationally Protected Persons.

Strategic outcome 4

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 4.1: Internal Services

The Internal Services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Strategic outcome 1

A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates compliance with the regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals, plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through active participation in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners and its negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Federal Assistance Program.

Strategic outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1: Internal Services

The Internal Services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Strategic outcome 1

Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge.

Program 1.1: Investigator-Initiated Health Research

To develop and support a well-trained base of world-class health researchers and trainees conducting ethically sound research across all aspects of health, including biomedical research, clinical research, research respecting health systems, health services, the health of populations, societal and cultural dimensions of health and environmental influences on health, and other research as required. The goal of this program is to advance health knowledge and to apply this knowledge in order to improve health systems and/or health outcomes. Grants and awards are disbursed to fund research or to provide career or training support. The specific area of research is identified by the researcher.

Program 1.2: Priority-Driven Health Research

Canadian Institutes of Health Research's provides funding to researchers for ethically sound emergent and targeted research that responds to the changing health needs and priorities of Canadians across all aspects of health, including biomedical research, clinical research, research respecting health systems, health services, the health of populations, societal and cultural dimensions of health and environmental influences on health, and other research as required. The goal of this program is to advance health knowledge and its application, in specific areas of research identified by Canadian Institutes of Health Research in consultation with other government departments, partners and stakeholders, in order to improve health systems and/or improve health outcomes in these priority areas. Grants are disbursed to fund research or to provide career or training support.

Strategic outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1: Internal Services

The Internal Services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Strategic outcome 1

Canadians are protected from excessive prices for patented medicines sold in Canada and stakeholders are informed on pharmaceutical trends.

Program 1.1: Patented Medicine Prices Regulation Program

The Patented Medicine Prices Review Board is an independent quasi-judicial body that is responsible for ensuring that the prices that patentees charge for patented medicines sold in Canada are not excessive based on the price review factors in the Patent Act (the Act). To make this determination the Board must consider each of the following factors: prices at which the medicine and other medicines in the same therapeutic class have been sold in Canada and in the seven comparator countries listed in the Patented Medicines Regulations (Regulations); changes in the Consumer Price Index; and in accordance with the Act, such other factors as may be specified in any regulations made for the purposes of the price review. Under the Act, and as per the Regulations, patentees are required to file price and sales information for each patented medicine sold in Canada, for the duration of the patent(s). Board Staff reviews the introductory and ongoing information filed by patentees, for all patented medicines sold in Canada. When it finds that the price of a patented medicine appears to be excessive, Board Staff will conduct an investigation into the price. An investigation could result in: its closure where it is concluded that the price was non-excessive; a Voluntary Compliance Undertaking by the patentee to reduce the price and offset excess revenues obtained as a result of excessive prices through a payment and/or a price reduction of another patented drug product; or a public hearing to determine if the price is excessive, including any remedial order determined by the Board. In the event that the Board Hearing Panel finds, after a public hearing, that a price is or was excessive, it may order the patentee to reduce the price and take measures to offset any excess revenues. This program, by reviewing the prices charged by patentees for patented medicines sold in Canada, protects Canadians and the health care system from excessive prices.

Program 1.2: Pharmaceutical Trends Program

The Patented Medicine Prices Review Board reports annually to Parliament through the Minister of Health on its price review activities, the prices of patented medicines and price trends for all drugs, and R and D expenditures as reported by pharmaceutical patentees. In supporting this requirement, the pharmaceutical trends program provides complete and accurate information on trends in manufacturers' prices of patented medicines sold in Canada and on patentees' research-and-development expenditures to interested stakeholders including: industry (i.e., brand-name, biotech, generic); federal, provincial and territorial governments; consumer and patient advocacy groups; third party payers; and others. This information also provides assurance to Canadians that the prices of patented medicines are not excessive. In addition, as a result of the establishment of the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System by federal, provincial and territorial ministers of health the Minister of Health requested that the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board conduct analysis of price, utilization and cost trends for patented and non-patented prescription drugs so that Canada's health system has more comprehensive, accurate information on how all prescription drugs are being used and on the sources of cost increases. This function is aimed at providing federal/provincial/territorial governments and other interested stakeholders with a centralized credible source of information on all prescription drug prices.

Strategic outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1: Internal Services

The Internal Services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Public Health Agency of Canada

Strategic outcome 1

Protecting Canadians and empowering them to improve their health.

Program 1.1: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

The Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Program aims to improve the overall health of the population—with additional focus on those that are most vulnerable—by promoting healthy development among children, adults and seniors, reducing health inequalities, and preventing and mitigating the impact of chronic disease and injury, as well as infectious diseases. Working in collaboration with provinces, territories, and stakeholders, the Program develops and implements federal aspects of frameworks and strategies (e.g. Curbing Childhood Obesity: A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Framework for Action to Promote Healthy Weights, national approaches to addressing immunization, HIV/AIDS) geared toward promoting health and preventing disease. The Program carries out primary public health functions of health promotion, surveillance, science and research on diseases and associated risk and protective factors to inform evidenced-based frameworks, strategies, and interventions.

Program 1.2: Public Health Infrastructure

The Public Health Infrastructure Program strengthens Canada's public health, workforce capability, information exchange, and federal, provincial and territorial networks, and scientific capacity. These infrastructure elements are necessary for effective public health practice and decision-making in Canada. The program works with federal, provincial and territorial stakeholders in planning for and building strategic and targeted investments in public health infrastructure, including public health research, training, tools, best practices, standards, and mechanisms to facilitate information exchange and coordinated action. Public health laboratories provide leadership in research, technical innovation, reference laboratory services, surveillance, outbreak response capacity and national laboratory coordination to inform public health policy and practice. Through these capacity-building mechanisms and scientific expertise, the Government of Canada facilitates effective coordination and timely public health interventions which are essential to having an integrated and evidence-based national public health system based on excellence in science. Key stakeholders include local, regional, provincial, national and international, public health organizations, practitioners and policy makers, researchers and academics, professional associations and non-governmental organizations.

Program 1.3: Health Security

The Health Security Program takes an all hazards approach to the health security of Canada's population, which provides the Government of Canada with the ability to prevent, prepare for and respond to public health events/emergencies. This program seeks to bolster the resiliency of the populations and communities, thereby enhancing the ability to cope and respond. To accomplish this, its main methods of intervention include actions taken through collaborations with key jurisdictions and international collaborators. These actions are carried out by fulfilling Canada's obligations under the International Health Regulations and through the administration and enforcement of pertinent legislation and regulations.

Strategic outcome 2

The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.

Program 2.1: Internal Services

The Internal Services program supports all strategic outcomes and is common across government. Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and oversight services; Communications services; Legal services; Human resources management services; Financial management services; Information management services; Information technology services; Real property services; Materiel services; Acquisition services; and Travel and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

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