2016 to 2017 Annual report on the Access to Information Act

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, 2016

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ISSN 2369-4122
Cat. No.: P1-30E-PDF

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Preface

The Access to Information Act (Revised Statutes of Canada, 1985, Chapter A-1) was proclaimed on July 1, 1983. The act was most recently amended as a result of the Royal Assent of the Federal Accountability Act on December 12, 2006. Certain provisions came into force on December 12, 2006, and others took effect on April 1, 2007, and September 1, 2007.

The Access to Information Act gives Canadian citizens, permanent residents as well as individuals and corporations present in Canada a right of access to information contained in government records subject to certain specific and limited exceptions.

Section 72 of the Access to Information Act requires that the head of every federal government institution prepare, for submission to Parliament, an annual report on the administration of the act within their institution during each fiscal year.

This annual report provides a summary of the management and administration of the Access to Information Act within Public Services and Procurement Canada for the fiscal year 2016 to 2017.

Part I: Introduction

1. Background

The department, founded in 1841 and originally known as The Board of Works, was instrumental in the building of our nation's canals, roads and bridges, the Houses of Parliament, post offices and federal buildings across the country. 

In 1993, the department became Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) through the amalgamation of the former Supply and Services Canada, Public Works Canada, Government Telecommunications Agency (Communications Canada), and the Translation Bureau (Secretary of State of Canada). In November 2015, the department's name changed to Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC).

The Department of Public Works and Government Services Act, passed in 1996, established the current department and set out the legal authorities for PSPC services. The act established PSPC as a common service organization that provides government departments, boards and agencies with support services for their programs.

PSPC employs approximately 12,500 permanent employees working in locations across Canada and headquartered in the National Capital Area.

The Office of the Procurement Ombudsman, an independent office, and part of the portfolio of the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, was established on May 5, 2008, as one of the final steps in the implementation of the Federal Accountability Act.

Our services are provided across Canada through 5 regional operations. We also operate international offices in Koblenz and Washington.

For more information about our department, refer to our organizational chart and the organization of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

2. Raison d'être and responsibilities

PSPC plays an important role in the daily operations of the Government of Canada. It supports federal departments and agencies in the achievement of their mandated objectives as their central purchasing agent, real property manager, linguistic authority, treasurer, accountant, pay and pension administrator, and common service provider. The department's vision is to excel in government operations, and our strategic outcome and mission is to deliver high-quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions. The goal is to manage business in a way that demonstrate integrity, accountability, efficiency, transparency, and adds value for client departments and agencies, and Canadians.

By enabling government-wide critical programs and services as well as delivering major transformation initiatives, the department is helping the Government of Canada do business in line with the modern standards defining a renewed organization such as efficiency, effectiveness, connectivity and better value for clients and Canadians.

The Office of the Procurement Ombudsman, which reports to the minister and operates independently, reviews complaints from suppliers. It also reviews procurement practices in departments and agencies, and makes recommendations for the improvement of those practices to ensure fairness, openness and transparency in the procurement process.

3. Strategic outcome and program alignment architecture

PSPC's program alignment architecture (PAA), as approved by the Treasury Board, supports the strategic outcome to deliver high-quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions. The following lists the programs that comprise PSPC's PAA:

  • Acquisitions
  • Accommodation management and real property services
  • Receiver General for Canada
  • Integrity programs and services
  • Federal pay and pension administration
  • Linguistic management and services
  • Specialized programs and services
  • Procurement OmbudsmanFootnote 1
  • Internal services

Part II: The Public Services and Procurement Canada Access to Information and Privacy Program

1. Access to Information and Privacy Directorate structure and responsibilities

The Access to Information and the Privacy (ATIP) Directorate administers the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act for PSPC, including one special operating agency, the Translation Bureau, as well as the Office of the Procurement Ombudsman.

In 2016 to 2017, the ATIP Directorate operated with up to 25 ATIP officers and 3 students who worked under the supervision of 4 team leaders to manage the requests received within the department. The directorate also employed 1 policy advisor and 5 senior ATIP policy advisors. The directorate was supported by a team of 5 clerical staff.

The Director, ATIP, reports to the Director General, Ministerial Services and Access to Information (DG-MSAI), who, in turn, reports to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy, Planning and Communications Branch (ADM-PPCB). Reporting to the director, ATIP, the teams are overseen by 3 managers of ATIP operations, and a manager of privacy and policy. The operational units are responsible for processing access to information requests, consultations, complaints, and court cases; the Privacy and Policy Unit is responsible for the privacy program as well as ATIP policy, advice, training, monitoring and reporting. The administrative functions are supported by an office manager and a team of support staff.

The directorate is responsible for establishing and directing all activities within PSPC relating to the management of the departmental Access to Information and Privacy Program, in accordance with the departmental delegation instruments and the provisions of the act, regulations, directives, policies and guidelines.

At PSPC, the administration of the act is also supported at the branch and regional office levels. Each organizational branch has an ATIP liaison officer who coordinates the collection of information and provides guidance to branch managers on the application of the acts, as well as related departmental directives and procedures.

2. Delegation instruments

Under section 3 of the act, the minister is designated as the head of the government institution for purposes of the administration of the act. Pursuant to section 73, the minister may delegate any powers, duties or functions under the act by signing an order authorizing one or more officers or employees of the institution, who are at the appropriate level, to exercise or perform the powers, duties or functions of the head, specified in the order.

Within PSPC, this delegation instrument is based on a centralized process with the director and managers of the Access to Information and Privacy Directorate having full delegated authority under the act. Certain administrative functions are also delegated to the ATIP team leaders to accelerate request processing. Full authority under the act is also delegated to the ADM-PPCB and the DG-MSAI who are responsible for the program.

An excerpt of the delegation of authorities approved at the ministerial level is attached in Annex A: Delegation of authorities (Excerpt).

3. Policies and procedures

3.1 Departmental Policy on Access to Information and Privacy

For the reference of all employees, departmental policies are posted on PSPC's intranet website.

The Policy on the Access to Information and Privacy Program (002) outlines the delegation of authority, establishes relevant definitions, and sets out the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders within PSPC.

3.2 Access to information and privacy liaison officer handbook

The ATIP liaison officer handbook complements the department policy on ATIP. It is produced by the ATIP Directorate as a guide to introduce departmental ATIP liaison officers across the department to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and regulations, to outline the roles and responsibilities of each PSPC ATIP stakeholder, and to provide national processing standards and guidelines for the centralized handling of requests.

3.3 Access to information and privacy directorate desk procedures

The ATIP Directorate has an ATIP officer desk procedures manual in place to standardize the work procedures used by staff, to facilitate the training of new ATIP employees and to complement the functionality of the electronic ATIP tracking system.

4. Training

4.1 Departmental employees

Given the complex nature of the Access to Information Act, and the need to balance the public's right to access information with the need to protect the legitimate interests of government and other parties, the ATIP Directorate provides regular guidance and information sessions.

During the fiscal year, the ATIP Directorate delivered 29 training and awareness sessions to 355 managers and employees at various levels from branches across the department.

As well, ATIP participates in sessions of the department's Orientation Program for new employees. This allows ATIP to provide information on employee obligations under the act, including an explanation of the duty to assist, a reminder that only those delegated under the act can make disclosure decisions, a reference to procedures for reporting suspected contraventions, as well as a link to the departmental policy on ATIP.

4.2 Access to Information and Privacy Directorate staff

The ATIP officer Development Program created in 2006 was revised in 2016 to 2017 to update the mandatory training section and to allow for internal deployment of qualified employees at level into the program. The objective of the program is to address the department's mid and long-term shortage of skilled ATIP professionals by recruiting new employees at the junior level, and preparing them to fill senior ATIP officer positions at the PM-4 group and level up to a 5-year horizon. The program is also intended to reduce the costs associated with the competitive staffing process and eliminate the need for consultants.

ATIP employees have the opportunity to take advantage of the ATIP training offered in house and by the Treasury Board Secretariat, and also attend conferences such as the Canadian Access and Privacy Association (CAPA) conference.

Part III: Statistical report—Interpretation and explanation of trends

The 2016 to 2017 statistical report on the Access to Information Act is attached in Annex B: Statistical report on the Access to Information Act.

1. Departmental overview of requests received

The ATIP Directorate processes all requests received by the department pursuant to the Access to Information Act. Each request is first reviewed for clarity and is then assigned to one or more organizational units of the department that are then responsible for locating and retrieving the records containing the information sought.

Organizational units review their relevant records and provide recommendations to the ATIP Directorate on potential sensitivities that could result from their disclosure. When necessary, the ATIP Directorate also undertakes consultations with other organizations and third parties before a skilled ATIP analyst reviews each record to make a decision on disclosure. The ATIP Directorate then notifies the requester and provides access to all of the records that may be disclosed.

The majority of the access to information (ATI) requests received by the department during 2016 to 2017 related to briefing notes on various topics, the replacement of fighter jets, the national ship building procurement strategy, and the remuneration services provided by PSPC, of which a good number related specifically to the Phoenix pay system.

2. Requests under the Access to Information Act

In the 2016 to 2017 fiscal year, the media represented the highest proportion of users of the act at PSPC, generating 37 percent of the requests received. The public was the second largest source of requests, constituting 28% of those received, whereas the business sector accounted for 26%. Four percent of the requesters declined to identify their source and the remaining came from organizations and the academic community. Chart I provides the related details.

Chart I: Access to information requests received by source

Volume and percentage of access to information requests received by PSPC, by source of request over the past 3 fiscal years (public, business, media, organization, and academia). - Text version below the chart
Summary of Chart I: Access to information requests received by source
  • Business: 340 requests (26%)
  • Public: 360 requests (28%)
  • Media: 483 requests (37%)
  • Decline to identify: 55 requests (4%)
  • Organization: 43 requests (4%)
  • Academia: 14 requests (1%)

A total of 1,491 requests were in progress during this reporting period, which represents a 37 % increase in volume compared with the previous fiscal year. Of the 1,491 requests in progress, 1,295 (87%) were new requests, while 196 requests (13%) were outstanding from the previous years. Chart II provides an overview of the trends related to the volume of requests processed by PSPC over the past 3 fiscal years.

Chart II: Processing trends for access to information requests

Number of pages processed and disclosed by PSPC over the past 3 fiscal years. - Text version below the chart
Summary of Chart II: Processing trends for access to information requests
  • 2014 to 2015: 170 outstanding requests from previous fiscal year, 691 received, 641 completed and 220 carried forward to next fiscal year
  • 2015 to 2016: 220 outstanding requests from previous fiscal year, 863 received, 886 completed and 197 carried forward to next fiscal year
  • 2016 to 2017: 196 outstanding requests from previous fiscal year, 1,295 received, 1,163 completed and 328 carried forward to next fiscal year

3. Requests closed during the reporting period

Of the 1,491 requests in progress, 1,163 requests (78%) were completed during the 2016 to 2017 reporting period. The remaining 328 requests (22%) were carried forward to the next fiscal year.

In addition to the above-noted workload, PSPC responded to 174 informal requests for records previously released under the act. This represents an 8 % increase compared with the previous reporting period.

Of the 1,163 cases completed, information was released either in whole or in part in 785 requests (68%), with more than 182,266 pages reviewed and 147,370 pages released. Chart III provides an overview of the disposition of requests closed by PSPC during the fiscal year.

Chart III: Disposition of access to information requests closed

Volume and percentage of access to information requests closed by PSPC, by disposition of requests (all disclosed, disclosed in part, all exempted/all excluded, no records exist, transferred, abandoned, and treated informally). - Text version below the chart
Summary of Chart III: Disposition of access to information requests closed
  • All disclosed: 230 requests (20%)
  • Disclosed in part: 555 requests (48%)
  • All exempted/all excluded: 22 requests (2%)
  • No records exist: 146 requests (12%)
  • Transferred: 27 requests (2%)
  • Abandoned: 183 requests (16%)
  • Neither confirmed nor denied: 0 request (0%)

4. Exemptions and exclusions

Sections 13 through 24 of the act set out the exemptions intended to protect information pertaining to a particular public or private interest, and section 26 of the act is an administrative exception relating to the publication of information.

Pursuant to section 68, the act does not apply to material that is published or available for purchase, library or museum material preserved solely for public record, material deposited with Library and Archives Canada. Records considered to be confidences of the Queen's Privy Council of Canada are also excluded pursuant to section 69 of the act.

These limited and specific exemption and exclusion provisions form the only basis for withholding information that is requested under the act.

Annex B: Statistical report on the Access to Information Act shows the types of exemptions and exclusions invoked during the period. For clarity, if 5 different exemptions and/or exclusions were applied in one request, each relevant section would be reported, for a total of 5. If the same exemption or exclusion was used several times for the same request, it would be reported only once.

PSPC is the holder of a considerable amount of commercial, technical and financial information from third parties and, as in past years, the majority of the requests received by the department were for records containing third party information. While third party information can at times be sensitive, PSPC endeavours to release as much information as permitted, to remain consistent with the spirit of the act and the severability provisions of its section 25.

As noted in Annex B: Statistical report on the Access to Information Act, personal information (subsection 19(1) of the act), third party information (paragraphs 20(1) (b) and (c)) as well as solicitor-client privilege (section 23) accounted for the majority of the exemptions applied by the department.

In the 2016 to 2017 fiscal year, exclusions were invoked pursuant to sections 68 and 69 of the act on 102 requests, or 9% of the total number of cases completed. This represents a 1% increase compared to the previous reporting period.

5. Format of information released

Of the 785 requests in which information was released (all disclosed or disclosed in part), the records were provided in the form of paper copies for 253 requests (32%), whereas 522 cases (66%) were in electronic format.

6. Complexity

PSPC processed over 240,000 pages during the reporting period. This represents a 12% increase compared with the previous fiscal year. While the files contained an average of 243 pages to be processed, 50 of the1,295 requests completed (4%) had over 1,000 pages, including 8 with more than 5,000 pages. Chart IV provides the trends related to the relevant pages processed and disclosed by PSPC over the past 3 fiscal years.

Chart IV: Trends for relevant pages processed and disclosed

Number of pages processed and disclosed by PSPC over the past 3 fiscal years. - Text version below the chart
Summary of Chart IV: Trends for relevant pages processed and disclosed
  • 2014 to 2015: 194,435 pages processed and 113, 700 pages disclosed
  • 2015 to 2016: 215,473 pages processed and 135,803  pages disclosed
  • 2016 to 2017: 240,567 pages processed and 147,486

In addition to the high volume of records, consultations were required for 413 of the 1,295 requests completed (32%). Other factors resulting in increased complexity included the multiple tasking and clarifications of requests, unique and unprecedented cases, as well as the processing and disclosure of electronic records in their original software format.

The consultation process on Cabinet confidences is also complex as detailed schedules must be prepared. In some cases, consultations have been returned to the ATIP Directorate seeking additional information that in turn required further internal and/or external consultations. This contributed to increasing the complexity and processing time.

7. Processing time

Due to the nature of PSPC's mandate, the records requested often contain commercially sensitive information as well as information created by or of greater interest to other government institutions. As a result, many of the requests required an extension pursuant to paragraphs 9(1) (b) and/or (c) of the act, in order to undertake the necessary consultations with other government institutions and third parties. Time extensions under paragraph 9(1) (a) of the act were also required for requests involving a large number of records.

Of the 1,163 requests completed during the fiscal year, 491 (42%) needed to be extended in accordance with section 9 of the act.

Despite the volume and complexity, 672 requests (58%) were completed within the initial 30-day period. The average processing time for all requests completed was 100 days. This is 24 days more than the previous fiscal year.

Since 2009 to 2010, the department has strived to maintain a high performance and attained a 95.2% compliance rate in 2016 to 2017 for responding to ATI requests within the legislated timelines.

During the reporting period, 56 requests fell in a deemed refusal status and were closed after the statutory deadline. On average, PSPC needed an additional 189 days to complete these late files.

The ATIP Directorate workload was the principal reason for delays in 46% of the 56 late cases. Factors such as the complexity of requests and the reassignment of files within the ATIP Directorate also contributed to the delays.

The department's timeliness and compliance continue to be closely monitored and reported to senior management on a weekly basis. The compliance rate is indicated in the weekly report sent by the ATIP coordinator to all Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) and branch liaison officers. A meeting takes place every week with the ADM of the Policy, Planning and Communications Branch (PPCB) and representatives from communications to have a look at the new requests and requests that may be released in the following 2 weeks. 

8. Translation

There were no requests for the translation of information from one official language to another.

9. Fees

The Access to Information Act authorizes a $5 application fee related to the processing of formal requests under the act. Although the act and its regulations permit charging other fees for processing requests, in May 2016, the President of the Treasury Board of Canada announced changes to the Directive on the Administration of the Access to Information Act which prohibited charging any fees beyond the initial $5 fee. This measure supports the Government of Canada's priorities surrounding an open and transparent government.

The fees collected during this reporting period totalled $5,295.00 while the fees waived in accordance with subsection 11(6) of the act were $2,619.60. Fees collected for this reporting period are estimated to represent less than 1% of the department's total cost of administering the ATIP Program. Fees charged for search and for programming were issued prior to the implementation of the May 2016 changes to the directive.

An electronic payment system continues to be used to facilitate the payment of fees by debit and credit cards.

10. Consultations from other government institutions and organizations

In addition to ATI requests, the department received 310 consultations during the reporting period, amounting to an additional 23,714 pages of records to review. A total of 314 consultations were in progress during the reporting period. PSPC responded to 297 consultations, within an average of 22 days. This is comparable to the previous fiscal year. Chart V provides consultation trends over the last 3 years.

Chart V: Processing trends for consultations

Volume of consultations from other government institutions processed by PSPC over the past 3 fiscal years.  Text version below the chart
Summary of Chart V: Processing trends for consultations
  • 2014 to 2015: 16 consultations outstanding from previous year, 378 consultations received, 375 consultations completed and 19 consultations carried forward to next fiscal year
  • 2015 to 2016: 19 consultations outstanding from previous year, 329 consultations received, 338 consultations completed and 10 consultations carried forward to next fiscal year
  • 2016 to 2017: 10 consultations outstanding from previous year, 310 consultations received, 302 consultations completed and 18 consultations carried forward to next fiscal year

11. Complaints and Court actions

Table I provides the breakdown of complaints made to the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada (OIC) and of requests for judicial review filed with the Federal Court and the Federal Court of Appeal.

Table I: Complaints and requests for judicial review
Reporting period Complaints Judicial reviews
2014 to 2015 27  3
2015 to 2016 78  3
2016 to 2017 39  0

11.1 Complaints to the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada

In 2016 to 2017, the OIC notified the department of 39 new complaints, 10 of which related to requests received in previous fiscal years. In addition to the fact that this represents a significant decrease compared with the previous fiscal year, 13 (33%) of the new complaints were made by 2 requesters.

Of the 39 new complaints, 12 (31%) related to information withheld under the act, 14 (36%) concerned missing records, 5 (13%) pertained to time extensions taken, and 5 (13%) were about delays. The remaining 3 complaints fell into the category of miscellaneous.

In 2016 to 2017, the OIC closed 57 complaints. Of these, 10 were well founded, 22 were discontinued, 11 were not well-founded, and 14 were settled/resolved. Although founded complaints represented less than 1% of requests closed during the period, PSPC regularly reviews investigative findings to improve its administration of the Access to Information Act.

11.2 Court actions

In 2016 to 2017, there were no applications for judicial review pursuant to sections 41 or 44 of the act.

12. Resources related to the Access to Information Act

The total salary costs associated with the Access to Information Program amounted to $2,302,178.00 and operations and maintenance costs amounted to $192,885.00, for a combined total of $2,495,063.00. The number of employees and temporary resources were estimated at 35 person years for the fiscal year 2016 to 2017.

Annex A: Delegation of authorities (Excerpt)

Please note that the November 4, 2011 version has been updated as follows:

Changes to Schedule 1

  • Integration of "printing" under goods procurement within department-wide authorities. While printing is currently covered under standing offers which offer specific authorities, integrating printing within the goods procurement will provide additional clarity and flexibility
  • Increased limits for the Software Licensing Supply Arrangements (SLSA) from $40K to $100K upon review of business volumes in collaboration with Acquisitions Branch
  • Integration of new travel authorities and revision of hospitality, events and conferences authorities in order to be aligned and compliant with the revised Treasury Board (TD) Directive on travel, hospitality, conference and event expenditures, effective August 1, 2013
  • Integration of a new authority for the chief financial officer to act as the delegated travel and hospitality approval authority in situations where the deputy minister participates at the hospitality event or is the traveler
  • Modification of the delegations pursuant to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act in order to reflect the transfer of the mandate for these authorities from the director general (DG), executive secretariat to the DG responsible for the ATIP program, and the provision of additional authorities to team leaders
  • Amendment to revenue agreement memorandum of understanding (MOU)s and Specific Service Agreement (SSAs) authorities in order to allow incumbents of certain real property positions (level 3 and 4) to perform low risk transactions in order to avoid project delays
  • Modification of the authority to make changes to the table of equivalent positions in order to allow the deputy minister to perform changes to the specific delegation of authorities in accordance with the TB Directive on delegation of financial authorities for disbursements
  • Addition or change to the "table of equivalent positions" and "specific delegation of authorities" tables to reflect the current organizational structures

Minister's and Deputy Minister's delegation of authorities

We hereby delegate the powers vested in the offices of the Minister and Deputy Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada, in the manner defined in Schedules 1 to 4, the associated tables of equivalent positions and specific delegations in the notes to these schedules, including officers appointed on a temporary or acting basis to positions so defined, subject to the principles, guidelines, limitations and restrictions described in the department's delegation of authorities manual and all relevant legislation, regulations and policies.

Specifically, this instrument is intended to delegate authority, as defined by:

Schedule 1
"Department-wide authorities", the "table of equivalent positions" for schedule 1 and the specific delegations contained in the "notes to schedule 1"
Schedule 2
"Real Property authorities", the "table of equivalent positions" for schedule 2 and the specific delegations contained in the "notes to schedule 2"
Schedule 3
"Common service acquisition authorities", the "table of equivalent positions" for schedule 3 and the specific delegations contained in the "notes to schedule 3"
Schedule 4
"Receiver General for Canada authorities"

Further, these delegations are made on the explicit understanding that they are to be used only to:

  • commensurate with the level of responsibility assigned to the position and when required to undertake the duties of that position as described in the operational plans of the department
  • attain departmental objectives, within the departmental mandate
  • attain clients' objectives when providing common services to client departments

The department's delegation of authorities manual documents the delegated authorities of Public Services and Procurement Canada and includes important information on the conditions under which we have made these delegations. All officers of the department who are acting on our behalf in any matter related to these delegations must make themselves familiar with the contents of the manual to ensure that they are fully cognizant of the conditions and implications of doing so.

Original signed by

The Honourable Judy M. Foote
P.C., M.P. (Bonavista-Burin-Trinity)
Minister of Public Services and Procurement
February 19, 2016

George Da Pont
Deputy Minister of Public Services and Procurement
January 19, 2016

Administrative authorities: Approvals
  Asset disposals Asset write-offs Asset loans Project approval: IT-enabled projects and business projects Treasury Board submission Amendment to the table of equivalent positions and specific delegations Access to Information Act Privacy Act Use of government vehicles Exemption from parking charges Certification of true copies Release settlement documents
Departmental limit Full Full Full Full and project complexity risk assessment level 3 Full Full Full Full Full Full Full Full
Generic levels
Level 1 50 Full Full 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61
Level 2 50 Full Full n/a n/a n/a 56 57 58 n/a n/a 61
Level 3 50 51 52 n/a n/a n/a 56 57 58 n/a n/a n/a
Level 4 50 51 52 n/a n/a n/a 56 57 58 n/a n/a n/a

Supplementary information

Columns 50 to 52 are administrative authorities that allow managers to identify assets for disposal, write-off or loan. The authority to complete these transactions is only delegated to officers of Materiel Management in Corporate Services or Regional Corporate Services, Strategic Management and Communications.

Departmental limit: Full means the authority to dispose, write-off or loan assets for which the department is responsible.

Level 1: Full means the authority to dispose, write-off or loan assets for which the manager is responsible.

Column 53 for IT-enabled projects, obtaining the approval from the Chief Information Officer of PSPC is also required.

Column 54 is a primary control on spending when that spending is outside the limits of departmental authority. This is the authority to initiate a TB submission. Only the minister and deputy minister may approve a submission to the Treasury Board.

Columns 55 to 61 are administrative authorities which are delegated to positions with assigned responsibility. Exercising of these authorities must also comply with relevant legislation, regulation and policy requirements and limitations.

Notes to schedule 1

The notes to the schedule define the exceptions where authority is delegated to specific positions. These delegations are referenced in the schedule.

Column 56 Access to Information Act

Specific delegation of authority
Applicable equivalent positions at that level Type of delegated authority
Level 1 ADM responsible for the ATIP Program Full
Director General responsible for the ATIP Program Full
Level 2 Director, Access to Information and Privacy Full
Level 3 Manager, Access to Information and Privacy Full
Level 4 Chief / Team leader, Access to Information and Privacy Fulltable 1 note 1
ATIP Officer Fulltable 1 note 2

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

Only in regard to sections 4(2.1), 7, 8(1), 9, 11(2) to 11(6), 19, 20, 23, 24(1), 25, 27, 28 and 33; and subsections 8(1), 11(2) to 11(6), 19(1) and 24(1) of the Access to Information Act; sections 6(1), 7(2)(3) and 8 and subsection 6(1), 7(2)(3) of the Access to Information Regulations.

Return to table 1 note 1referrer

Table 1 Note 2

Only in regard to sections 4(2.1), 9 and subsection 27(1) of the Access to Information Act.

Return to table 1 note 2referrer

Annex B: Statistical report on the Access to Information Act

Statistical report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution:
Public Services and Procurement Canada
Reporting Period:
April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017

Part 1: Requests under the Access to information Act

1.1 Number of requests
Type Number of requests
Received during reporting period 1,295
Outstanding from previous reporting period 196
Total 1,491
Closed during reporting period 1,163
Carried over to next reporting period 328
1.2 Sources of requests
Source Number of requests
Media 483
Academia 14
Business (private sector) 340
Organization 43
Public 360
Decline to identify 55
Total 1,295
1.3 Informal requests
Completion time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
41 67 79 21 0 0 1 209

Note

All requests previously recorded as "treated informally" will now be accounted for in this section only.

Part 2: Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 36 129 43 15 5 2 0 230
Disclosed in part 27 141 115 169 56 36 11 555
All exempted 0 4 2 2 1 0 0 9
All excluded 4 4 1 2 0 2 0 13
No records exist 35 98 9 3 0 1 0 146
Request transferred 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 27
Request abandoned 145 26 1 4 0 4 3 183
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 274 402 171 195 62 45 14 1,163
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
13(1)(a) 8
13(1)(b) 1
13(1)(c) 2
13(1)(d) 9
13(1)(e) 0
14 0
14(a) 0
14(b) 0
15(1) 0
15(1) – International affairs 5
15(1) – Defence 7
15(1) –Subversive Activities 0
16(1)(a)(i) 0
16(1)(a)(ii) 0
16(1)(a)(iii) 0
16(1)(b) 0
16(1)(c) 2
16(1)(d) 0
16(2) 0
16(2)(a) 0
16(2)(b) 0
16(2)(c) 28
16(3) 0
16.1(1)(a) 0
16.1(1)(b) 0
16.1(1)(c) 0
16.1(1)(d) 0
16.2(1) 1
16.3 0
16.4(1)(a) 0
16.4(1)(b) 0
16.5 0
17 1
18(a) 3
18(b) 55
18(c) 0
18(d) 7
18.1(1)(a) 3
18.1(1)(b) 0
18.1(1)(c) 0
18.1(1)(d) 0
19(1) 338
20(1)(a) 1
20(1)(b) 265
20(1)(b.1) 0
20(1)(c) 232
20(1)(d) 22
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1)(a) 85
21(1)(b) 108
21(1)(c) 38
21(1)(d) 6
22 4
22.1(1) 0
23 85
24(1) 63
26 1
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
68(a) 8
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 0
68.2(a) 0
68.2(b) 0
69(1) 0
69(1)(a) 3
69(1)(b) 0
69(1)(c) 2
69(1)(d) 7
69(1)(e) 12
69(1)(f) 0
69(1)(g) re (a) 26
69(1)(g) re (b) 0
69(1)(g) re (c) 20
69(1)(g) re (d) 14
69(1)(g) re (e) 9
69(1)(g) re (f) 1
69.1(1) 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 98 129 3
Disclosed in part 155 393 7
Total 253 522 10

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 53,044 51,608 230
Disclosed in part 17,6922 95,762 555
All exempted 657 0 9
All excluded 549 0 13
Request abandoned 9,395 116 183
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1000 pages processed 1001 to 5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 195 2,921 20 3,951 6 3,727 6 1,4218 3 26,791
Disclosed in part 374 8,572 107 20,911 34 15,135 36 49,005 4 2,139
All exempted 7 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 11 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 180 0 1 116 1 0 0 0 1 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 767 11,493 132 24,978 41 18,862 42 63,223 8 28,930
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of fees Legal advice sought Other Total
All disclosed 42 1 0 102 145
Disclosed in part 347 3 2 220 572
All exempted 5 1 0 1 7
All excluded 10 0 0 0 10
Request abandoned 9 1 1 1 12
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 413 6 3 324 746

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Principal Reason
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
59 27 5 4 23
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 7 5 12
16 to 30 days 3 2 5
31 to 60 days 4 6 10
61 to 120 days 6 10 16
121 to 180 days 2 2 4
181 to 365 days 0 4 4
More than 365 days 0 8 8
Total 22 37 59
2.7 Request for translation
Translation requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 9(1)(a) Interference with operations 9(1)(b) Consultation 9(1)(c) Third party notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 15 5 18 10
Disclosed in part 50 49 144 168
All exempted 0 0 2 4
All excluded 0 2 3 1
No records exist 0 0 0 1
Request abandoned 7 1 5 6
Total 72 57 172 190
3.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 9(1)(a) Interference with operations 9(1)(b) Consultation 9(1)(c) Third party notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 33 1 41 3
31 to 60 days 26 9 48 114
61 to 120 days 10 32 68 48
121 to 180 days 2 14 12 13
181 to 365 days 1 1 3 10
365 days or more 0 0 0 2
Total 72 57 172 190

Part 4: Fees

Fees collected and Waived or refunded
Fee collected Fee waived or refunded
Fee type Number of requests Amount Number of requests Amount
Application 1,036  $5,180.00 111  $570.00
Search 1  $65.00 2  $165.00
Production 0  $0.00 0  $0.00
Programming 1  $50.00 1  $50.00
Preparation 0  $0.00 0  $0.00
Alternative format 0  $0.00 0  $0.00
Reproduction 0  $0.00 112  $1,834.60
Total 1,038  $5,295.00 226  $2,619.60

Part 5: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of  pages to review Other organizations Number of  pages to review
Received during the reporting period 304 19,951 6 3,763
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 10 922 0 0
Total 314 20,873 6 3,763
Closed during the reporting period 297 19,903 5 3,166
Pending at the end of the reporting period 17 970 1 597
5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendations Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 71 110 29 4 0 0 0 214
Disclose in part 7 20 18 3 0 0 0 48
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 2 8 0 0 0 0 0 10
Other 13 9 3 0 0 0 0 25
Total 93 147 50 7 0 0 0 297
5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendations Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3
Disclose in part 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5

Part 6: Completion time of consultations on cabinet confidences

6.1 Requests with Legal Services
Number of days Fewer than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 74 636 11 1,228 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 9 68 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
31 to 60 3 36 5 93 1 21 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 2 60 1 88 1 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 1 148 0 0 1 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 88 800 20 1,557 2 21 2 0 0 0
6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of days Fewer than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages Disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Complaints and investigations

Number of complaints and investigations notices received
Section 32 Section 35 Section 37 Total
39 1 0 40

Part 8: Court action

Number of applications for judicial review
Section 41 Section 42 Section 44 Total
0 0 0 0

Part 9: Resources related to the Access to Information Act

9.1 Costs of resources associated with the privacy program
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $2,299,543.00
Overtime $2,635.00
Goods and services
  • Professional services contracts: $0
  • Other: $192,885.00
$192,885.00
Total $2,495,063.00
9.2 Number of employee and temporary resources
Resources Person years dedicated to access to information activities
Full-time employees 31.70
Part-time and casual employees 0.75
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00
Students 3.05
Total 35.50
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