Exploring accessibility and federal procurement

Watch how we’re learning about where barriers exist so we can make buying and selling for the federal government more accessible for persons with disabilities.

Transcript: Exploring accessibility and federal procurement

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[Music plays]

(Text on screen: Public Services and Procurement Canada)

(Text on screen: This footage was recorded prior to the Government of Canada’s physical distancing guidelines. Canadians are encouraged to continue to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines.)

[Image of workshop audience listening to host speaker.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking in front of a window]

(Text on screen: Associate Director, Accessible Procurement Resource Centre, Public Services and Procurement Canada.)

My name is Mike Conway. I'm the Associate Director responsible for Strategic Policy Sector, and more specifically the Accessible Procurement Resource Centre, with the department of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

[Image of workshop audience watching a video presentation.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

[Shot of workshop audience listening to a guest speaker.]

We brought together today a group of individuals from across government to explore notions around accessibility and procurement.

[Shot of an audience member using a braille captioning device.]

[Shot of an audience member nodding their head.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

[Shot of an audience member writing notes.]

[Shot of audience members having a discussion.]

Our objective today is to get a better understanding from various perspectives on where barriers exist within procurement, whether it be from the supplier’s perspective, the perspective of buyers or end-users, with the hope ultimately of articulating a challenge statement to put forward to suppliers or innovators in Canada, to come up with innovative solutions which would help improve government services for persons with disabilities.

[Shot of an audience member reading a text handout on accessibility statistics.]

[Graphic animation appears, illustrating the number of Canadians living with a disability.]

(Text: 22% of Canadians.)

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

[Shot of workshop organizer attaching a blank piece of poster paper to the wall with the title ‘Challenge / Barriers’ written at the top.]

[Shot of an audience member writing words on a post-it note.]

[Shot of an audience member sticking a post-it note to the poster that is attached to the wall.]

[Shot of an audience member reading poster covered with post-it notes.]

We know that upwards of 6 million Canadians have identified as having a disability of some form or another, whether that be visible, invisible, temporary or permanent, and it is incumbent upon us to remove as many barriers as possible so that they can then become fully participated and included in Canadian society.

[Shot of audience members discussing the poster’s content.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking in front of audience members.]

I'm very passionate about this subject. I personally have been working with the department of Public Services and Procurement Canada for upwards of 19 years, trying to improve outcomes related to the public procurement.

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

[Shot of laptop with live captions of the guest speaker’s presentation.]

[Shot of guest speaker holding up a mobile phone into the air.]

[Shot of Michael Conway speaking.]

I recognized very fully that the Government of Canada disposes of a powerful lever in trying to shift market supply in terms of the goods and services that we buy, and demanding that new innovative solutions which improve outcomes for Canadians across the board, whether that be in the areas of environmental benefits, social inclusion or reducing barriers for persons with disabilities.

(Text on screen: Check us out: facebook.com/PSPC.SPAC, instagram.com/pspc_spac, twitter.com/pspc_spac, youtube.com/PWGSCanada)

(Public Services and Procurement Canada signature)

[Music stops]

(Canada wordmark)

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