Section 4—Annexes— The Long Term Vision and Plan Annual Report 2014–15

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4.1 Project profiles

Sir John A. Macdonald Building

Sir John A. Macdonald Building

This building, opposite Parliament Hill, was constructed in the early-1930s by the Bank of Montreal in its role as bank to the Government of Canada prior to the creation of the Bank of Canada. A classified heritage building made of limestone and granite, the design of the building won the 1932 Royal Architectural Institute of Canada gold medal for its depiction of modernized Beaux-Arts design in Canada.

Scope of work

The building has been fully rehabilitated for ceremonial and parliamentary functions, as well as meeting and conference facilities. A new annex has been constructed providing support services including: security screening, food services, storage and loading areas, washrooms, as well as meeting space with translation and broadcasting capabilities to support parliamentary functions.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

Wellington Building

Wellington Building

The Wellington Building was completed in 1927 as headquarters for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. An impressive example of Beaux-Arts design and a recognized heritage building, the Wellington Building is an important and substantial building within the Precinct with over 45,000 m2 of space. The Government of Canada purchased the building in 1973.

Scope of work

The building is being completely renovated and rehabilitated for parliamentary accommodations, to include 10 committee rooms and 70 parliamentary office units. In addition, the work includes the removal of hazardous materials, upgrading of all building systems, restoration of masonry, windows and roof, seismic upgrading of the structure, and reconstruction of the interior of the building for flexible parliamentary uses.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

Visitor Welcome Centre – phase 1

Visitor Welcome Centre – phase 1

The construction of a new Visitor Welcome Centre phase 1 is part of the rehabilitation plans for Parliament Hill. It will be constructed mostly below-grade, and will be designed to be compatible with, but distinct from, the historical structures of Parliament Hill and to be sensitive to its natural surroundings.

Scope of work

The Visitor Welcome Centre phase 1 will provide visitor welcome services, security screening services, shipping and receiving facilities for the West Block, and a utility pathway between adjacent buildings. The Visitor Welcome Centre phase 1 will be constructed in parallel with the rehabilitation of West Block.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

West Block

West Block

The design and construction of West Block began in 1859, officially opening in 1866 for government offices. Two additions were later made: the Mackenzie Wing and Tower in 1878 and the Laurier Tower and link in 1906. Major renovations to the interior and exterior of the building were done in 1965.

Scope of work

West Block will be used by the House of Commons during the rehabilitation of Centre Block. To accommodate these functions, West Block will be fully rehabilitated including structural restoration, seismic reinforcement, and upgrading of all building systems to current standards. The building will be used for parliamentary offices, meeting and committee rooms, and will include the construction of a new courtyard infill to be used as the interim House of Commons Chamber. The long term use of the West Block, following the return of the House of Commons Chamber to Centre Block, has been considered in the project’s planning and design.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

Senate interim accommodations (Government Conference Centre)

Senate interim accomodations (Government Conference Centre)

Originally built in the early 1900s as Ottawa’s central train station, this grand Beaux-Arts building was purchased by the Government of Canada and converted to a government conference centre in the late 1960s. A classified heritage building located adjacent to the National War Memorial and alongside the historic Rideau Canal, the Government Conference Centre (GCC) has been the site of many significant national and international events.

Scope of work

The building, which has not had major work since the 1970s, will be fully rehabilitated to provide interim Senate accommodations while Centre Block undergoes its much needed rehabilitation beginning in 2018. During that period, the GCC will be home to the interim Senate Chamber, 21 parliamentary office units and three committee rooms. Work will include abatement of hazardous materials, seismic and exterior building upgrades, complete replacement of building systems, and the reconfiguration and renovation of the interior space for parliamentary functions.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

East Block, 1867 wing

East Block, 1867 wing

East Block was built in 1859 as part of the original Parliament Hill construction. One of the world’s best examples of High Victorian Gothic Revival architecture, East Block is Parliament Hill’s most intact building and includes some of the best examples of stone and ironwork craftsmanship in the country. In 1910, a wing was added linking the two ends of the original building and creating a courtyard.

East Block will be fully rehabilitated in two phases: the first will focus on the exterior rehabilitation of the 1867 wing, and the second will complete the exterior rehabilitation and undertake a full interior rehabilitation.

Scope of work

The first phase is primarily an envelope rehabilitation project of the 1867 wing. Work will include seismic and structural reinforcement; rehabilitation of stone masonry, including foundation and site drainage work; window and door repair; installation of new roofing; and conservation of ornamental metal work.

Project schedule and status

Accomplishments in fiscal year 2014–15

Looking ahead to fiscal year 2015–16

Budget

4.2 Risk management

The delivery of a program as complex and multifaceted as the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) requires rigorous risk management. This includes PPB’s own processes, as well as the third party oversight by both government and private sector specialists. Key elements include:

Contracting: PWGSC’s Integrity Framework is intended to increase departmental due diligence in its dealings with third parties in order to reduce fraud against the Crown. Major construction work on Parliament Hill is contracted through a transparent, two-stage process to promote competition. All contractors on Parliament Hill must obtain a security clearance. During the procurement process, responsibility for technical and contracting authority is clearly separate within PWGSC. Independent Fairness Monitors review and report on major procurements and provide independent assurance to departmental management, client departments, government suppliers, Parliament, and Canadians that PWGSC’s large and complex procurement activities are conducted in a fair, open, and transparent manner. These reports are published on the PWGSC website.

Audit regime: The Auditor General has audited PWGSC on its work in the Precinct three times since the 1990s. The department retained a private firm in 2012 to assess the project management practices for six major capital projects, including West Block and 180 Wellington. The audit observed sound project management systems, controls, outputs, and practices in all projects. A second firm was retained to conduct cost audits of amounts invoiced by construction managers and the West Block, Sir John A. Macdonald and Wellington projects received clean audit reports. In addition, internal audits are conducted on a regular and ongoing basis.

Cost, schedule and design quality management: Cost estimates, schedules and design quality management are developed by a prime consultant for each project, and are then reviewed, assessed, and challenged by internal and external experts. Estimates are also reviewed on a monthly basis by independent costing experts.

The National Project Management System (NPMS): As part of a comprehensive project management process, NPMS has ensured that projects continue to be delivered using an accountable and cost-effective methodology. The requirement to produce a ‘lessons learned’ document at the end of each project provides staff with an understanding of the time, effort and costs associated with risk management. In addition, these reviews serve as reminders of the importance of adhering to applicable policies and dealing with issues in a timely manner.

The rehabilitation of the buildings within the Precinct is of a scale and complexity unrivalled in Canada. Given the extent of the interventions, PPB has used pilot projects on many buildings to obtain valuable information about building conditions and reduce the likelihood of time, scope, or budgetary risks for major projects. Early work on the West Block’s North Towers provided invaluable insight into the extent and nature of the program required for the full West Block rehabilitation. PPB also partnered with the Universities of Calgary, Alberta and Manitoba to tap into their knowledge and facilities for leading-edge seismic testing of replica walls made of the same stone as the Parliament buildings. This provided research and evidence for the large-scale structural reinforcement of heritage masonry walls.

Long Term Vision and Plan operational risks

The Parliamentary Precinct Branch (PPB) has identified the following operational risks and mitigation measures associated with the delivery of the LTVP program:

Risk Risk statement Risk response
Complex, major projects & procurements
(Corporate Risk 2)
There is a risk that PPB may not be able to meet project schedules, maintain project scopes, or respect project budgets, due to numerous inherent risks associated with complex and major transformational construction projects currently being delivered within the LTVP.

LTVP projects maintain contingency plans and budgets for unexpected parliamentary and governmental priority shifts.

LTVP projects are developed to be flexible to allow down-time or re-positioning of resources to accommodate shifts in direction or government priorities.

Informed client activities have been developed intended to make clients knowledgeable of project activities, and allow for participation in design-based decision-making.

A Buildings in Transition (BiT) Operations portfolio was developed to integrate Operational considerations  into the NPMS planning tool, to provide objective guidance to project teams and to operate newly delivered buildings to ensure sound transition from project to operations.

HR strategy
(Corporate Risk 3)
There is a risk that PPB may not have the appropriate staff, with the necessary skills in the right numbers at the optimal time to deliver the services needed to meet the Branch mandate and business objectives.

The branch currently attends recruitment fairs, engages trade associations and explores internships and student bridging opportunities.

The branch continues to leverage private sector consulting to support PPB Program delivery.

Contract management (Operational Risk 1) There is a risk that contracts may not carry adequate provisions to prevent disruptions to parliamentary business. There is a risk that contracts may not carry adequate provisions to prevent disruptions to parliamentary business.

PPB ensures LTVP contract integrity using strict protocols in place within Real Property Branch’s Real Property Contracting Directorate.

PPB has developed and maintained an internal contracting integrity process (CPSS) to ensure small project and procurement quality, accountability and integrity.

PPB maintains cyclical contract reporting, detailing contract details, status, and value as a monitoring strategy.

There is co-location of departmental procurement specialists in MCP units.

Compliance
(Operational Risk 2)
There is a risk that projects or public works may not comply with applicable legislation, regulations, governmental or departmental policies or that these compliance considerations will not be included in project planning, and/or monitored during project delivery

PPB retains the services of dedicated, construction safety and other specialized technical expertise (i.e.: environmental, fire safety, electrical, etc.) to consult and advise on contractual and work requirements.

PPB Health & Safety Committee regularly reviews departmental policies, and advises affected parties when policies are revised, or when contravention to the H&S policy has occurred.

Reputation
(Operational Risk 5)
There is a risk that increased visibility of public works occurring within the Parliamentary Precinct may be misperceived, inaccurately reported upon, or may otherwise cause a negative opinion of the business conducted by PPB, thereby affecting the reputation of the branch, the department and possibly the federal government.

External communications (i.e.: website) have been updated and augmented as required to respond to frequently asked questions.

Ongoing issues management and response ensures factual, timely communications.

Close relations with the Minister’s Office ensures currency and verity of information, and provides guidance for release of information.

4.3 Public Works and Government Services Canada National Project Management System

The National Project Management System (NPMS) is Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)'s project management framework for Real Property Projects and IT-Enabled Projects. The NPMS framework defines key principles and provides the directives, roadmaps, deliverables and tools needed to successfully deliver projects on scope, on time and on budget.

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