The year in review—The Long Term Vision and Plan Annual Report 2016 to 2017

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Program financial performance

In the fiscal year from 2016 to 2017, solid progress was made in advancing the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) and planning for future projects. 

Total LTVP expenditures in the fiscal year from 2016 to 2017 were $364.2 million, bringing overall program expenditures to $2,531.2 million as of March 31, 2017 as shown in figure 4.

Figure 4: Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 4: Long Term Vision  and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2016 to 2017  (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 4: Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Fiscal years Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $69.1 $67.2 n/a
2002 to 2003 $119.5 $115.0 n/a
2003 to 2004 $178.4 $189.3 n/a
2004 to 2005 $234.7 $249.4 n/a
2005 to 2006 $313.4 $307.8 n/a
2006 to 2007 $395.1 $391.6 n/a
2007 to 2008 $463.3 $459.1 n/a
2008 to 2009 $532.6 $532.7 n/a
2009 to 2010 $659.1 $658.6 n/a
2010 to 2011 $785.6 $788.1 n/a
2011 to 2012 $933.7 $934.5 n/a
2012 to 2013 $1,161.5 $1,139.5 n/a
2013 to 2014 $1,444.1 $1,423.2 n/a
2014 to 2015 $1,802.1 $1,779.1 n/a
2015 to 2016 $2,210.1 $2,167.0 n/a
2016 to 2017 $2,592.1 $2,531.2 $2,531.2
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $2,985.2
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $3,429.1

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Overall, program spending decreased slightly over the previous fiscal year, reflecting the completion and continuing close out of some major capital projects, including the rehabilitation of the Wellington Building. The overall LTVP budget and expenditures are shown in figure 5.

Figure 5: Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars)

Figure 5: Long Term Vision  and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 5: Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars)
Year Amount Percentage
Previous years $2,167.0 46%
Fiscal year 2016 to 2017 $364.2 8%
Fiscal year 2017 to 2018 $454.0 10%
Fiscal year 2018 to 2019 and future years $1,717.7 36%

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

A breakdown of previous, current and future fiscal year expenditures is shown in figure 6.

Figure 6: Long Term Vision and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 6: Long Term Vision  and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 6 Long Term Vision and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Month Budget Expenditures Forecast
April $424.8 $0.0 $372.5
May $424.8 $10.6 $376.7
June $424.8 $20.0 $372.7
July $424.8 $52.1 $358.6
August $424.8 $82.8 $357.4
September $447.0 $102.5 $385.0
October $447.0 $125.6 $384.0
November $382.0 $153.0 $373.8
December $382.0 $176.3 $373.3
January $382.0 $210.1 $373.2
February $382.0 $242.5 $358.7
March $382.0 $364.2 $358.7

Note: All forecasts are for currently Treasury Board approved projects and are subject to change.

Expenditures for each of the 5 program components are shown in figure 7. This breakdown of program expenditures is similar to last fiscal year; some adjustments occurred due to the introduction of the Security Program. In fiscal year 2016 to 2017, Major Capital Program (MCP) represented (81%) of all LTVP expenditures, followed by Recapitalization Program (RECAP) and Planning (6.0%), Building Components and Connectivity Program (BCC) (4.0%), and Security (3.0%). Figure 8 has been included to provide a comparison between program budgets and expenditures.

Figure 7: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 7: Total Long Term  Vision and Plan expenditures by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to figure 7: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Program Expenditures Percentage
Major Capital Program $293.1 81%
Recapitalization Program $21.5 6%
Building Components and Connectivity Program $15.7 4%
Security Infrastructure Program $12.6 3%
Planning Program $21.4 6%

Figure 8: Total Long Term Vision and Plan budget by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 8: Total Long Term  Vision and Plan budget by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to figure 8: Total Long Term Vision and Plan budget by program fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Program Budget Percentage
Major Capital Program $289.7 76%
Recapitalization Program $31.1 8%
Building Components and Connectivity Program $17.6 5%
Security Infrastructure Program $22.5 6%
Planning Program $21.1 5%

Analysis of overall LTVP expenditures by cost category for the fiscal year from 2016 to 2017, as represented in figure 9, indicates that the largest LTVP cost is construction at 62% of total expenditures, followed by professional fees at 21%. Professional fees include third-party expenditures in the areas of architecture and engineering, construction management, project management, business analysis, costing, scheduling and heritage conservation/preservation.

Looking forward, overall LTVP expenditures are planned to increase as the next rolling program of work is implemented.

Figure 9: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 9: Total Long Term  Vision and Plan expenditures by category fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to figure 9 Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Category Expenditures Percentage
Construction $225.6 62%
Building components and connectivity $25.2 7%
Professional fees $77.9 21%
Other costs $5.8 2%
Leases $29.8 8%

Program milestones

Major Capital Program

Figure 10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure  10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program  cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Fiscal year Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $46.0 $44.1 n/a
2002 to 2003 $75.1 $70.6 n/a
2003 to 2004 $98.5 $109.4 n/a
2004 to 2005 $139.1 $153.8 n/a
2005 to 2006 $203.7 $198.1 n/a
2006 to 2007 $269.0 $265.5 n/a
2007 to 2008 $327.9 $323.8 n/a
2008 to 2009 $390.0 $390.1 n/a
2009 to 2010 $511.3 $510.8 n/a
2010 to 2011 $621.0 $623.7 n/a
2011 to 2012 $747.1 $749.2 n/a
2012 to 2013 $949.9 $929.6 n/a
2013 to 2014 $1,196.5 $1,176.4 n/a
2014 to 2015 $1,497.9 $1,483.3 n/a
2015 to 2016 $1,844.5 $1,811.4 n/a
2016 to 2017 $2,134.2 $2,104.5 n/a
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $2,474.6
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $2,804.4

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Centre Block

As the centerpiece of Parliament Hill, Centre Block is the iconic image of Parliament for Canadians, a national landmark, and a Classified Federal Heritage Building. It is home to the Senate of Canada, the House of Commons, and the Library of Parliament. The building is also occupied by Parliamentary Protective Services, the Privy Council Office (for the Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet Room) and by Public Services and Procurement Canada for building maintenance.

Up to this point, the rehabilitation and modernization of the Centre Block has been the main driver of the LTVP. Respecting the vision and guiding principles of the LTVP, an integrated project team, with representatives from Public Services and Procurement Canada, the Parliamentary Partners, and private industry experts, has overseen a robust program of work to define what needed to be done. This work included:

From 2016 to 2017, the project to rehabilitate Centre Block was successfully launched with the achievement of a number of key milestones. The project and policy authorities to proceed with the rehabilitation were secured in 2016. This allowed the project team to move forward with the two important procurement processes for the construction manager and the architectural and engineering services. 

In advance of performing any substantive construction, PPB will launch a series of enabling projects as well as detailed investigation programs to further refine the scope, the cost and the schedule.

West Block

The West Block is the oldest of the buildings on Parliament Hill, constructed in three phases between 1859 and 1909. West Block was originally designed to provide offices for the federal bureaucracy, and later converted to provide accommodations for Parliamentary functions. The last major renovations to the interior and exterior were undertaken in the 1960s.

The West Block is nearing completion of a major rehabilitation project, which began in 2011. The project includes structural restoration, seismic reinforcement, and upgrading of all building systems to current standards.

When completed, the building will be used by the House of Commons providing much needed accommodations during rehabilitation of Centre Block. To accommodate these functions, the rehabilitated West Block will include parliamentary offices, meeting and committee rooms as well as the interim House of Commons Chamber, being constructed as an infill within the building’s interior courtyard.

During 2016 to 2017, major work was completed on the project, construction of the courtyard and the North Court progressed well, and the installation of the glass Chamber roof neared completion. Exterior masonry work was also completed during the year, and work on interior finishes begun.

There are 140,000 individual stones on the West Block. During the masonry work, 13.5% (19,000 stones) were replaced and 45% were dismantled and rebuilt, including 28 chimneys and 2 spires. This required 3,000 tons of sand and 108,000 buckets of mortar. At the peak of masonry rehabilitation, over 200 masons were on site every day, including 62 apprentices, of which 18 were women. Both totals are the highest ever recorded by the masonry union in all of North America.

By March 31, 2017, the project was reported 87% complete, and on time and on budget. The rehabilitation of the West Block and the construction of the interim House of Commons Chamber will be ready for occupancy by the opening session of Parliament in the fall of 2018. The long term use of the West Block, following the return to Centre Block, is for House of Commons functions, and this has been considered in the project's planning and design.

East Block

The East Block is the most intact of Parliament Hill’s main buildings and is one of the world’s finest examples of High Victorian Gothic architecture. The East Block was built in two phases, the first was completed in 1865 and included the west and south wings, collectively known as the 1867 Wing. In 1910, a second wing was added to the east of the original structures (the 1910 Wing), which enclosed the courtyard.

The East Block is a key parliamentary asset, fully occupied by the Senate of Canada, and accommodating Senate parliamentary offices, committee rooms, and other Senate functions.

The 1867 Wing of East Block is now 150 years old and major work was last performed on this building in the 1970s. Numerous areas of this wing are displaying major signs of deterioration and are in critical need of rehabilitation, this includes cracked stones, worn carvings, corroded ironwork and damage from water infiltration.

PPB is approaching the need for rehabilitation of the East Block in two distinct phases. The first phase is focused on areas of greatest concern within the 1867 Wing. It includes urgent repairs to the southwest tower, the southeast tower, and to the south entrance and the Governor General’s entrance. In addition, PPB is implementing an enhanced maintenance program. The interiors of the East Block are in relatively good condition and so only minor interior upgrades will be undertaken in Phase I. This will permit the business of the Senate to continue in the building until it can be fully vacated during the second phase of work. Phase I has been approved, construction is expected to begin in 2017 and be completed by the end of 2020.

During 2016 to 2017, design, construction planning and preparation of construction documents for Phase I progressed well. Maintenance screening and investigation activities were also conducted. By March 31, 2017, the $80.6M Phase I project met its target of 20% completion, and was on time and on budget.

The second phase of the East Block rehabilitation will address remaining exterior work including in the 1910 Wing, as well as a complete seismic reinforcement for the entire building, and replacing interior building systems with modern systems. This program of work will require the complete relocation of all uses and functions out of the building for a multi-year period. Planning is underway for the second phase of the East Block project to confirm its scope, costs and timing.

Visitor welcome centre complex

To improve visitor experiences and to enhance security, a new visitor welcome centre complex is being built on Parliament Hill. The complex will be a modern underground facility, and is being designed to blend perfectly with the historical structures and natural surroundings of Parliament Hill.

The construction of a new visitor welcome centre complex is a key part of the larger rehabilitation plan for Parliament Hill and is being built in two phases. When completed, it will link the West, Centre and East Block buildings.

The visitor welcome centrecomplex will provide visitor welcome services, security screening, shipping and receiving facilities and a utility pathway between the buildings. Visitor services will include:

Construction of Phase 1 began in 2016 and is being undertaken in parallel with the rehabilitation of the adjacent West Block. The initial phase will provide the west entrance to the complex and a new public entrance for the West Block. Phase I is designed to enable expansion to the east which will ultimately service and link the West, Centre and East Block buildings.

During the 2016 to 2017 fiscal year, major excavation activities were completed on the $130M project. Work on the concrete structure also continued during the year and is now in the final stages, and rough-ins for mechanical and electrical systems have begun. By March 31, 2017, the project was reported 82% complete, and on time and on budget. Phase 1 of the visitor welcome centre will be ready to welcome its first visitors for the opening session of Parliament in the fall of 2018.

In September 2017 the Governor General of Canada, David Johnson, dedicated the new visitor welcome centre complex.

Wellington building

The Wellington Building was built in 1927 as the headquarters for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and acquired by the Government of Canada for Federal use in 1973. It is an impressive example of Beaux-Arts design, a recognized heritage building, and an important and substantial asset within the Parliamentary Precinct providing over 45,000  of space.

The Wellington Building re-opened in 2016 after being completely rehabilitated over the last six years, at a cost of $425M. The building earned a very high eco-rating of four Green Globes, demonstrating leadership in energy and environmental design practices. The building now provides accommodations for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Precinct Services including parliamentary office units, committee rooms and related amenities. Rehabilitation and re-use of the Wellington Building is a key enabler for the Centre Block project.

Rehabilitation of the Wellington Building included removal of hazardous materials, upgrading of all building systems, restoration of masonry, windows and roofs, seismic upgrading of the structure, and reconstruction of the interiors for parliamentary uses. The building now features a new central, multi-level atrium and also houses a resource library and committee rooms.

The rehabilitation project undertaken for the Wellington Building was fully in alignment with federal sustainability and environmental performance targets and was a model for putting these objectives and targets into practice. An incredible 97% of non-contaminated waste was either reused or recycled, far exceeding the department's target of 80%.

Sustainable and energy efficient measures incorporated into the building’s rehabilitation included:

The long term use of the Wellington Building is for House of Commons functions.

Government conference centre

The Government Conference Centre (GCC) was built in 1912 and served as Ottawa's central train station for more than 50 years. A grand Beaux-Arts heritage building, it was purchased by the Government of Canada in the 1960s and converted for use as a government conference centre. Other than limited adaptations in the 1970s, the building remained in its original state and was in critical need of rehabilitation.

The GCC is now being fully rehabilitated to provide interim accommodations for the Senate, who require accommodations for approximately ten years while the Centre Block undergoes rehabilitation. During this time, GCC will accommodate an interim Senate Chamber, Senate parliamentary offices, committee rooms, and other Senate functions.

Work on this $220M rehabilitation project to make the building ready for Senate occupancy began in 2015, and includes:

From 2016 to 2017, construction on the GCC project progressed well. Structural upgrades are nearing completion, and the exterior and interior masonry, construction of an east addition and a loading dock, and the installation of mechanical and electrical systems are all well underway. Work on interior finishes has also begun. At March 31, 2017, the project was reported 57% complete and ahead of its target year end completion of 45%.

The rehabilitated GCC building will be ready for occupancy by the opening session of Parliament in the fall of 2018.

Recapitalization Program

Figure 11: Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 11: Long Term  Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and  budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 11: Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Fiscal year Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $11.0 $11.0 n/a
2002 to 2003 $25.4 $25.4 n/a
2003 to 2004 $51.0 $51.0 n/a
2004 to 2005 $57.7 $57.7 n/a
2005 to 2006 $61.4 $61.4 n/a
2006 to 2007 $64.6 $64.6 n/a
2007 to 2008 $70.0 $70.0 n/a
2008 to 2009 $73.5 $73.5 n/a
2009 to 2010 $75.9 $75.9 n/a
2010 to 2011 $83.4 $83.3 n/a
2011 to 2012 $97.9 $96.8 n/a
2012 to 2013 $113.3 $112.7 n/a
2013 to 2014 $128.5 $128.5 n/a
2014 to 2015 $151.5 $147.3 n/a
2015 to 2016 $175.3 $170.9 n/a
2016 to 2017 $206.4 $192.5 n/a
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $214.0
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $250.5

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change

The Recapitalization Program (RECAP) addresses projects in buildings that are occupied and operational but have not yet been fully rehabilitated. Projects are designed to preserve buildings, stop or reduce ongoing deterioration, respond to urgent building repair requirements, address health and safety issues, and reduce the cost and complexity of future work. The RECAP is also responsible for the restoration and rehabilitation of the heritage Parliament Hill grounds, an important element of the LTVP vision and guiding principles.

From 2016 to 2017, the RECAP of work met all completion forecasts, with all projects proceeding on schedule. Four major projects were completed and closed-out during the 2016 to 2017 fiscal year, including the rehabilitation of the east pavilion envelope and ventilation towers of Centre Block, the first phase of the window and sash repair project at the Confederation Building, and the rehabilitation of the north perimeter wall on the parliament grounds.

At the present time, the following RECAP projects are underway:

Building Components and Connectivity Program

Figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan  Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts  and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent to figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Fiscal year Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $6.3 $6.3 n/a
2002 to 2003 $11.5 $11.5 n/a
2003 to 2004 $19.0 $19.0 n/a
2004 to 2005 $26.1 $26.1 n/a
2005 to 2006 $33.9 $33.9 n/a
2006 to 2007 $45.9 $45.9 n/a
2007 to 2008 $49.4 $49.4 n/a
2008 to 2009 $51.6 $51.6 n/a
2009 to 2010 $52.6 $52.6 n/a
2010 to 2011 $58.3 $58.1 n/a
2011 to 2012 $61.6 $61.5 n/a
2012 to 2013 $66.8 $66.5 n/a
2013 to 2014 $82.1 $81.5 n/a
2014 to 2015 $103.4 $100.9 n/a
2015 to 2016 $122.9 $124.0 n/a
2016 to 2017 $140.5 $139.7 n/a
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $156.2
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $178.5

Note: All projects are for currently approved projects and are subject to change

The BCC program includes two elements: the delivery of building fixtures, furnishings and equipment needed for accommodations to be fully functional, and the modernization of campus-wide communications and information technology (IT). Projects include major modifications within the two centralized data centres, as well as interconnected service applications for more than 30 buildings within the Campus. These IT projects are coordinated and integrated with LTVP construction projects as they roll out to ensure the efficient and cost-effective delivery of BCC program elements.

From 2016 to 2017, the BCC Program completed equipment deliveries  and reached substantial completion on schedule for four projects, including the Wireless Computer Networking, Core Network Infrastructure Revision, Trunked Radio Communication System, and Master Control and Distribution Upgrade.

The program also received approval to initiate the South of Wellington Connectivity, Cable Access Television (CATV), Datacentre Risk Mitigation, and IT Infrastructure Base Building Upgrades projects. Work continues on the Integrated Security System Upgrade and the Next Generation Network Infrastructure-Telephony projects.

Planning Program

In fiscal year 2016 to 2017, planning project expenditures were $21.4 million, an increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year as shown in figure 13. Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the Planning Program are expected to increase over the coming years with the planned implementation of the next five-year rolling program of work including projects in support of the update of the LTVP.

Figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative  expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent to figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Fiscal year Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $5.8 $5.8 n/a
2002 to 2003 $7.5 $7.5 n/a
2003 to 2004 $9.8 $9.8 n/a
2004 to 2005 $11.8 $11.8 n/a
2005 to 2006 $14.4 $14.4 n/a
2006 to 2007 $15.6 $15.6 n/a
2007 to 2008 $16.0 $16.0 n/a
2008 to 2009 $17.5 $17.5 n/a
2009 to 2010 $19.3 $19.3 n/a
2010 to 2011 $23.0 $23.0 n/a
2011 to 2012 $27.0 $26.9 n/a
2012 to 2013 $31.4 $30.8 n/a
2013 to 2014 $37.0 $36.9 n/a
2014 to 2015 $49.4 $47.6 n/a
2015 to 2016 $67.4 $60.7 n/a
2016 to 2017 $88.5 $82.0 n/a
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $96.1
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $114.2

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

The Planning Program focuses on the development of strategic master plans, sector development plans, and enabling studies that guide investment decisions and the prioritization of future projects. This program ensures that all future work in the Precinct aligns with the overarching vision and guiding principles of the LTVP. The planning team provides master plans and studies to support the initiation of new projects, and coordinates active projects to ensure they dovetail and contribute to the broader objectives of the LTVP. Once projects have been identified and the preplanning work is complete, projects are transferred to the MCP and RECAP for delivery.

From 2016 to 2017, the Planning Program reached a number of milestones, including:

100 Wellington

The former Unites States Embassy, located directly across from the Centre Block at 100 Wellington Street, has been vacant for nearly 2 decades.

During the summer of 2016, PPB partnered with Nielsen, Delaney and Publivate and EKOS Research Associates Inc. to conduct public consultations on the future use of 100 Wellington. The consultation process consisted of:

  • a workshop with community and government stakeholders to validate the list of potential uses to be included in the public survey
  • a media tour of 100 Wellington
  • a public information forum led by Minister Foote with support from Minister McKenna and the Mayor of Ottawa, as well as guest speakers Larry Beasley and Victoria Angel, presenting historical and planning considerations for 100 Wellington
  • a series of public open houses at 100 Wellington
  • an online, bilingual public opinion survey, available from August 18 to September 9, 2016. Over 7,100 people responded to the survey  

The results of the public opinion survey were posted online on December 22, 2016. The top three choices among survey respondents included a Canada House, a Gallery, and an Indigenous Cultural Centre.

On June 21, 2017 the Prime Minister announced that 100 Wellington will become a space for Indigenous Peoples. The Government of Canada will work in full partnership with representatives of First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation on next steps in the design and redevelopment of 100 Wellington to ensure it becomes an inclusive space that reflects the vision of Indigenous Peoples and the spirit of reconciliation. 

Security Infrastructure Program

In fiscal year 2016 to 2017, security infrastructure project expenditures were $12.6 million. Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the Security Infrastructure Program are expected to increase over the coming years with the planned implementation of the next five-year rolling program of work.

Figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative  expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Fiscal year Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
2015 to 2016 $0.0 $0.0 n/a
2016 to 2017 $22.5 $12.6 n/a
2017 to 2018 n/a n/a $44.3
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $81.5

Note: All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Annual and quarterly on time, on scope, on budget results

Public Service and Procurement’s 2016 to 2017 Report on Plans and Priorities established targets that all Parliamentary Precinct rehabilitation and construction projects greater than $1.0 million be within 90% of their time, budget and scope targets for the fiscal year. As shown in figure 15, all MCP, RECAP, BCC, and security projects exceeded their targets for the fiscal year, illustrating PPB’s solid project management capabilities and continued success in the delivery of capital projects.

Note: Planning is not included in this evaluation as the program does not have any capital projects.

Long Term Vision and Plan on-time, on-scope, on budget performance for fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Indicator Target Result
Percentage of Major Capital Program construction projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 100%
Percentage of Recapitalization Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 100%
Percentage of Building Components and Connectivity Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 90% 100%

Figure 15: Long Term Vision and Plan on-time, on-scope, on budget performance for fiscal year 2016 to 2017

Figure 15: Long Term Vision and Plan on-time, on-scope, on budget performance for fiscal year 2016 to 2017 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 15: Long Term Vision and Plan on-time, on-scope, on budget performance for fiscal year 2016 to 2017
Program Percentage
quarter 1
Percentage
quarter 2
Percentage
quarter 3
Percentage
quarter 4
Major Capital Program 100% 100% 100% 100%
Recapitalization Program 100% 100% 100% 100%
Building Components and Connectivity Program 100% 100% 100% 100%
Security Infrastructure Program 100% 100% 100% 100%

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