The year in review—The Long Term Vision and Plan Annual Report 2017 to 2018

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Program financial performance

In the fiscal year from 2017 to 2018, solid progress was made in advancing the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) and planning for future projects.

Total LTVP expenditures were $469.2 million, bringing overall program expenditures to $3,000.4 million as of March 31, 2018 (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 4: Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 4: Long Term Vision and Plan total cumulative expenditures and forecasts fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)
Fiscal years Total budget Total expenditures Total forecast
Prior fiscal years $69.1 $67.2 n/a
2002 to 2003 $119.5 $115.0 n/a
2003 to 2004 $178.4 $189.3 n/a
2004 to 2005 $234.7 $249.4 n/a
2005 to 2006 $313.4 $307.8 n/a
2006 to 2007 $395.1 $391.6 n/a
2007 to 2008 $463.3 $459.1 n/a
2008 to 2009 $532.6 $532.7 n/a
2009 to 2010 $659.1 $658.6 n/a
2010 to 2011 $785.6 $788.1 n/a
2011 to 2012 $933.7 $934.5 n/a
2012 to 2013 $1,161.5 $1,139.5 n/a
2013 to 2014 $1,444.1 $1,423.2 n/a
2014 to 2015 $1,802.1 $1,779.1 n/a
2015 to 2016 $2,210.1 $2,167.0 n/a
2016 to 2017 $2,592.1 $2,531.2 n/a
2017 to 2018 $3,078.4 $3,000.4 $3,000.4
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $3,441.4
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $3,686.2

Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Overall, program spending increased slightly over the previous fiscal year, reflecting the significant advancement of the Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1 and the Government Conference Centre, security infrastructure upgrades, and the commencement of enabling projects and investigative work on the Centre Block. The overall LTVP budget and expenditures are shown in figure 5.

Figure 5: Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars)

Figure 5: Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of Figure 5: Long Term Vision and Plan cash flow (in millions of dollars)
Year Amount Percentage Percentage spent to date
Previous years $2,531.2 53.8% 63.8%
Fiscal year 2017 to 2018 $469.2 10.0%
Fiscal year 2018 to 2019 $441.0 9.4% n/a
Fiscal year 2019 to 2020 and future years $1,261.5 26.8% n/a

Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Figure 6: Long Term Vision and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 6: Long Term Vision and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 6 Long Term Vision and Plan monthly financial situation fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)
Month Budget Expenditures Forecast
April $530.3 $0.0 $490.6
May $530.3 $2.5 $455.8
June $530.3 $19.1 $431.1
July $530.3 $47.5 $430.5
August $530.3 $85.6 $425.6
September $530.3 $116.3 $429.1
October $530.3 $139.7 $422.1
November $486.2 $180.3 $421.0
December $486.2 $214.2 $420.9
January $486.2 $265.6 $453.7
February $486.2 $318.0 $456.5
March $486.2 $469.2 $456.5

Note

All forecasts are for currently Treasury Board approved projects and are subject to change.

Expenditures for each of the 5 program components are shown in figure 7. This breakdown of program expenditures is slightly different from last fiscal year, partly due to the increased importance of the Security Infrastructure Program. In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, Major Capital Program (MCP) represented (70%) of all LTVP expenditures, followed by Security Infrastructure Program (20%), Recapitalization Program (RECAP) (5%), Building Components and Connectivity Program (BCC) (3%), and Planning Program (3%). Figure 8 has been included to provide a comparison between program budgets and expenditures.

Figure 7: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 7: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to Figure 7: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by program—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)
Program Expenditures Percentage
Major Capital Program $329.9 70%
Recapitalization Program $23.4 5%
Building Components and Connectivity Program $14.7 3%
Security Infrastructure Program $91.4 20%
Planning Program $9.8 2%

Figure 8: Total Long Term Vision and Plan budget by program—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 8: Total Long Term Vision and Plan budget by program - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to Figure 8: Total Long Term Vision and Plan budget by program—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)
Program Budget Percentage
Major Capital Program $342.8 70%
Recapitalization Program $24.7 5%
Building Components and Connectivity Program $17.6 4%
Security Infrastructure Program $91.4 19%
Planning Program $9.8 2%

Analysis of overall LTVP expenditures by cost category for the fiscal year from 2017 to 2018, as represented in Figure 9, indicates that the largest LTVP cost is construction at 65% of total expenditures, followed by professional fees at 20%. Professional fees include third-party expenditures in the areas of architecture and engineering, construction management, project management, business analysis, costing, scheduling and heritage conservation/preservation.

Looking forward, overall LTVP expenditures are planned to increase as the next rolling program of work is implemented.

Figure 9: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 9: Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars) - Text description below.
Table equivalent to Figure 9 Total Long Term Vision and Plan expenditures by category—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)
Category Expenditures Percentage
Construction $304.14 65%
Building components and connectivity $38.8 8%
Professional fees $94.0 20%
Other costs $4.48 1%
Leases $28.0 6%

Program milestones

Major Capital Program

The Major Capital Program (MCP) encompasses the primary construction of new and rehabilitation projects necessary to advance the priority of restoring the main heritage buildings – West Block, Centre Block, and East Block. MCP also covers the rehabilitation, construction, and fit-up of all buildings in the Precinct for interim and permanent accommodations, as well as facilities outside the Precinct that provide supporting functions to Parliament.

  • In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, MCP expenditures were $329.9 million, a slight increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year (Figure 10). This increase reflects the significant advancement of the Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1 and the Government Conference Centre, as well as the commencement of enabling projects and investigative work on Centre Block
  • All MCP projects were on time, on scope, and on budget for the fiscal year 2017 to 2018
  • Looking ahead, total annual expenditures within the MCP are expected to increase slightly over the next fiscal year, then decrease the following year as major projects are completed ahead of the implementation of the next rolling program of work (including Centre Block)

Figure 10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of figure 10: Long Term Vision and Plan Major Capital Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Annual budget Annual expenditures Annual expenditures forecast
Prior fiscal years $46.0 $44.1 n/a
2002 to 2003 $75.1 $70.6 n/a
2003 to 2004 $98.5 $109.4 n/a
2004 to 2005 $139.1 $153.8 n/a
2005 to 2006 $203.7 $198.1 n/a
2006 to 2007 $269.0 $265.5 n/a
2007 to 2008 $327.9 $323.8 n/a
2008 to 2009 $390.0 $390.1 n/a
2009 to 2010 $511.3 $510.8 n/a
2010 to 2011 $621.0 $623.7 n/a
2011 to 2012 $747.1 $749.2 n/a
2012 to 2013 $949.9 $929.6 n/a
2013 to 2014 $1,196.5 $1,176.4 n/a
2014 to 2015 $1,497.9 $1,483.3 n/a
2015 to 2016 $1,844.5 $1,811.4 n/a
2016 to 2017 $2,134.2 $2,104.5 n/a
2017 to 2018 $342.8 $329.9 n/a
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $354.9
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $158.2
Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

West Block

Originally designed to be used by the federal public service, the West Block is one of the oldest parliamentary buildings. The load-bearing masonry structure was built in three periods, starting before Confederation in 1859, with a tower and wing addition in 1878, and the latest wing completed in 1909.

The West Block Rehabilitation project aims at meeting the current and future needs of Parliamentarians, while respecting its heritage character. Once completed, the West Block will provide accommodations to the House of Commons during the rehabilitation of the Centre Block, including four committee rooms, offices for the Prime Minister, House officials and officers, party leaders and party whips. The permanent courtyard infill will serve as the House of Commons Chamber. Rehabilitation work began in 2011.

2017 to 2018 progress

In 2017 to 2018, the West Block Rehabilitation project was advanced to its final phase and is now almost ready to host its new tenants. As of March 31, 2018, the project was completed at 95%, on time and on budget. In 2017 to 2018, PPB has:

  • completed the installation of the glass roof for the interim House of Commons Chamber
  • completed the construction of the interim House of Commons Chamber and two committee rooms
  • completed construction of many key areas, allowing the delivery of furniture to begin
  • operationalized new steam and chilled water/heating and cooling systems as well as primary and emergency power systems

Up next

In 2018 to 2019, the focus will be on finalizing the finishing touches to complete the rehabilitation of the building and working with the House of Commons to transition its operations to the building. Some of the remaining work includes:

  • connecting and testing new information technology and multimedia equipment
  • completing the security infrastructure
  • completing interior finishes such as millwork
  • working with Parliamentary Partners to move Members of Parliament and their staff to their new offices
Symbol for sustainability

Once the Centre Block rehabilitation is completed and parliamentarians have reintegrated the building, the West Block will return to hosting various House of Commons functions with significantly more usable space.

Symbol  for accessibility

The rehabilitated West Block will be more energy efficient with LED lighting systems, and reduced lighting and heating requirements due to the Chamber's new glass roof

The rehabilitated West Block will provide a barrier-free path of travel on all floors, including the public viewing gallery in the Chamber, an elevator able to accommodate a power-assisted wheelchair, and barrier-free stalls within washrooms. Braille signage and stairs with contrasting edge strips to aid the visually impaired will also be put in place.

Symbol for Opportunities for Canadians

The West Block Rehabilitation project will create and/or sustain approximately 5,000 jobs.

A new glass roof for the House of Commons' Chamber

Symbol for sustainabilityDuring the summer of 2017, the glass roof over the courtyard of the West Block was completed, creating an impressive ceiling for the interim House of Commons Chamber. The roof is supported by twenty steel columns that rise up like giant trees surrounding the room. The top surface of the roof is built of glass and aluminum and includes operable louvers to control the level of light. Natural light is evenly dispersed via lay light panels installed between the base of the glass roof and the steel columns. These lay lights help diffuse the light entering the Chamber through the roof and reduce the lighting requirements for this area. White steel forming the diamond patterns in the glass roof also creates an airspace in which air is naturally heated and then recirculated to heat other areas of the building, making the building more energy efficient.

Visitor Welcome Centre

Designed to blend perfectly with the historical structures and natural surroundings of Parliament Hill, Phase 1 of the Visitor Welcome Centre is the first new building to be built on the Hill in over 100 years. This modern, multi-level underground facility will help maintain a balance between openness and security by acting as the principal entrance to Parliament during the rehabilitation of the Centre Block.

In front of the main entrance, a plaza with trees and seating will offer a gathering and waiting area for visitors. From there, visitors will enter the buildings through a subtle, yet elegant, main entrance built into the historic Vaux Wall to the west of the Centre Block. Once inside, visitors will be greeted in a bright and open space that is sophisticated and engaging.

The Visitor Welcome Centre will not only provide enhanced secure access for parliamentarians and staff, as well as visitor screening outside the footprint of the main Parliament buildings, it will also improve visitor experience to one of Canada's most important heritage sites and popular tourist attractions.

Did you know

A stone was laid at the entrance of the new Visitor Welcome Centre by His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada? This stone was sourced from a 200-year old quarry in Queenston, Ontario. To mark this occasion, the stone was engraved by one of the world's finest stone carvers and his apprentice. Both are alumni of a Canadian charitable organization and heritage academy which was granted Royal Patronage by His Royal Highness Charles, Prince of Wales.

2017 to 2018 progress

In 2017 to 2018, PPB advanced this project to its final stage. As of March 31, 2018, the project was completed at 93%, on time and on budget. This includes:

  • completed the installation of the mechanical and electrical systems
  • significantly advanced installation of interior masonry and vaulted ceilings
  • installed the main stairs, escalators and elevators
  • installed brand new terrazzo flooring
  • operationalized new steam and chilled water/heating and cooling systems as well as primary and emergency power systems

Up next

In 2018 to 2019, the focus will be on:

  • completing the interior finishes including the installation of doors and interior stone
  • finishing the landscaping
  • turning the building over to Parliamentary Partners so that they may prepare to welcome visitors in winter 2019

Once Phase 1 is completed, work on the Visitor Welcome Centre will continue, but under the Centre Block Rehabilitation project's scope of work. The plan for future phases of the Visitor Welcome Centre is to connect Phase 1 with a new underground structure leading to the Centre Block and the East Block.

Symbol for sustainability

Energy efficient measures incorporated in the Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1 include the selection of sustainable materials for interior fit-up and water saving plumbing systems. As this project is a new construction, PPB has more flexibility when it comes to sustainability.

Symbol  for accessibility

New accessibility measures incorporated in the Visitor Welcome Centre help provide a barrier-free and equal experience to all people and visitors. This includes barrier-free paths of travel in all publically accessible floors, barrier-free amenities including wheelchair accessible washrooms, counters, lavatories and drinking fountains, braille signage in elevators as well as voice floor indicators, and much more!

Symbol for Opportunities for Canadians

The Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1 project will create and/or sustain approximately 600 jobs.

Government Conference Centre

Built in 1912 as Ottawa's central train station, this building was acquired by the Government of Canada in the 1960s and converted into the Government Conference Centre (GCC). The GCC occupies a prominent location in downtown Ottawa at 2 Rideau Street, a short distance from Parliament Hill and across the street from the historic Fairmont Château Laurier.

Once fully rehabilitated, the GCC will be home to the Senate of Canada for the duration of the Centre Block rehabilitation. This includes an interim Senate Chamber, three committee rooms, and parliamentary office units for leadership and legislative functions.

The GCC's Beaux-Arts style design and heritage designation make it a fascinating rehabilitation project because, other than limited adaptions in the 1970s, the building remains in its original state. As such, its historic finishes and contemporary detailing resonate with the rich and long history of the Senate.

2017 to 2018 progress

In 2017 to 2018, PPB advanced this project to its final phase. As of March 31, 2018, the project was completed at 90%, on time and on budget. This includes:

  • completed the most complex and risky construction work including demolition, abatement, excavation and structural
  • completed exterior masonry repairs
  • completed the installation of mechanical and electrical systems as well as all major wall partitions

Up next

In 2018 to 2019, the focus will be on:

  • completing the east addition to the building
  • completing the Chamber and committee rooms
  • completing the information technology infrastructure
  • completing interior finishes such as drywall, moldings, plaster ceilings, and more
  • completing landscaping and exterior work and lighting
  • working with the Senate to prepare for building occupancy

In addition to meeting the interim accommodation needs of the Senate, the rehabilitated GCC will help meet the long-term real property needs of PSPC after the Senate returns to the Centre Block.

Symbol for sustainability

Energy efficient measures incorporated in the GCC include water-saving plumbing systems, windows with improved thermal performance, energy efficient lighting sources, occupancy sensors in the committee rooms which will help reduce energy consumption, and much more!

Symbol  for accessibility

Once rehabilitated, the GCC will provide barrier-free paths of travel on all floors – including the public viewing gallery in the Chamber, and elevators able to accommodate power-assisted wheelchairs, and barrier-free stalls within washrooms. Measures are also being implemented for the visually impaired, such as braille signage and stairs with contrasting edge strips.

Symbol for Opportunities for Canadians

The GCC rehabilitation project will create and/or sustain approximately 1,400 jobs.

Centre Block

Built between 1916 and 1927, the Centre Block is one of Canada's most important national symbols. An icon of Canadian democracy, the Centre Block is home to the Senate of Canada, the House of Commons, and the Library of Parliament. The building is also occupied by the Parliamentary Protective Service, the Privy Council Office (for the Prime Minister's Office and Cabinet Room) and by Public Services and Procurement Canada for building maintenance.

The modernization of the Centre Block has been the main driver of the LTVP. The preservation of this majestic piece of our nation's history is the largest heritage restoration project that has ever been undertaken in Canada. It includes many facets, such as restoring the building's stonework, wood, plaster, frescoes, stained glass and metalwork, replacing mechanical, electrical and fire safety systems, installing new IT, multimedia and security systems, improving accessibility to offer an equitable experience to all visitors, and much more. When the Centre Block reopens, it will be ready to meet the needs of a 21st-century parliament for years to come.

2017 to 2018 progress

In 2017 to 2018, the Centre Block Rehabilitation project has been planning for the move of people and functions out of the building and preparing for major construction work to begin in 2019. As of March 31, 2018 the project:

  • launched a comprehensive program which examines building conditions and will help refine costs, scope and schedule for the project. This is the Investigation Program
  • launched various projects addressing work required prior to initiating the rehabilitation of the Centre Block. These projects are enabling projects
  • developed the construction site concept
  • initiated the development of a Performance Measurement and Reporting Framework

Up next

Some of the work to be carried out in 2018 to 2019 for the Centre Block Rehabilitation project includes:

  • working with Parliamentary Partners to empty Centre Block and transition parliamentary operations to the West Block and the Government Conference Centre
  • continuing to execute the enabling projects
  • completing the comprehensive Investigation Program
  • initiating schematic design
  • advancing an Innovation Strategy and begin its implementation
  • continuing to implement and improve the effective use of the Integrated Lean Program Delivery method – a concept in which all stakeholders collaborate in a shared environment to improve transparency and communication
Symbol for sustainability

The Centre Block Rehabilitation project has put in place a dedicated Sustainability Program which will focus on making the most of opportunities to use more efficient and sustainable systems, all while carefully maintaining the building's heritage character. Through these targeted efforts, the Centre Block will become a model for sustainability in heritage buildings.

PPB is committed to applying environmental sustainable design elements that will assist to modernise daily activities, streamline operations and improve occupant comfort and wellness.

East Block

The East Block is the most intact of Parliament Hill's original heritage buildings and presently hosts various functions for the Senate of Canada. This building was built in two major periods. The first portion, which includes the main West and South wings, was completed in 1865, but is referred to as the 1867 Wing. A second wing was added in 1910. As major work on the 1867 Wing was last completed in the late 1970s, the East Block is now in need of rehabilitation. While its interior is in good condition, portions of the exterior require an overhaul from the foundation all the way to the roof as it is showing signs of deterioration such as cracked stones, worn carvings, corroded ironwork, and damage from water infiltration. PPB is approaching this building's rehabilitation in two phases.

Phase 1 of the project focuses on rehabilitating the exterior of the 1867 Wing. This includes urgent repairs to four of the areas of greatest concern within this wing: the southwest tower, the southeast tower, the south entrance and the Governor General's entrance. These repairs involve the rehabilitation of the heritage masonry, seismic reinforcements to the masonry, the restoration of stained glass, windows and exterior doors, as well as the replacement of some of the copper roof and the conservation of ornamental ironwork. Over the course of Phase 1, planning for the second phase of work will also take place. Construction for Phase 1 began in 2017.

Phase 2 of the project will take place once the building is vacated and will address the work remaining after the completion of Phase 1. PPB is assessing options for this project, including refinement of cost and schedule. Phase 2 will address areas such as completing any remaining exterior work that was not covered in the first phase, including the 1910 Wing, completing seismic upgrades to the entire building, linking the building with the Visitor Welcome Centre, as well as upgrading the building to comply with modern building codes and to meet the needs of the Senate.

Did you know

The East Block's exterior has some of the most remarkable examples of stonework and ironwork in Canada. It is also one of the world's finest examples of High Victorian Gothic architecture. Much of the exterior rehabilitation work requires special care and will be performed by heritage masons. These craftspeople will use traditional techniques and hand tools to return this building to its beautiful appearance of yesteryear.

2017 to 2018 progress

As of March 31, 2018, the project was completed at 39%, on time and on budget. This fiscal year, PPB has:

  • implemented an ongoing screening and investigations program to identify and take action on issues that need to be addressed before the full rehabilitation occurs
  • completed construction documents for all key areas of Phase 1
  • began Phase 1 rehabilitation work, including construction on the southeast tower, one of the four areas of concerns
  • continued research and evaluation work to determine scope, cost and timing of Phase 2
Symbol for sustainability

Sustainability measures incorporated in the East Block will include water-saving plumbing systems, energy efficient systems and sources, waste management solutions and smart building technologies.

Symbol for accessibility

Phase 1 of the East Block rehabilitation project will ensure universal accessibility at the entrance of the building, while Phase 2 will ensure universal accessibility throughout the facility.

Symbol for Opportunities for Canadians

Phase 1 of the East Block rehabilitation project will create and/or sustain approximately 500 jobs.

Recapitalization Program

The Recapitalization Program (RECAP) addresses projects in buildings that are occupied and operational but have not yet been fully rehabilitated. Projects are designed to preserve buildings, stop or reduce ongoing deterioration, respond to urgent building repair requirements, address health and safety issues, and reduce the cost and complexity of future work. RECAP is also responsible for the restoration and rehabilitation of the heritage Parliament Hill grounds, an important element of the LTVP vision and guiding principles.

  • In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, RECAP expenditures were $23.4 million, a slight increase over expenditures in the previous fiscal year as shown in Figure 11
  • All RECAP projects were on time, on scope and on budget
  • Looking ahead, total annual expenditures within the RECAP are expected to decrease for the coming fiscal year, then increase in 2019 to 2020 with the planned implementation of the next rolling program of work

Figure 11: Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 11: Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of Figure 11: Long Term Vision and Plan Recapitalization Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Annual budget Annual expenditures Annual expenditures forecast
Prior fiscal years $11.0 $11.0 n/a
2002 to 2003 $14.4 $14.4 n/a
2003 to 2004 $25.6 $25.6 n/a
2004 to 2005 $6.8 $6.8 n/a
2005 to 2006 $3.7 $3.7 n/a
2006 to 2007 $3.2 $3.2 n/a
2007 to 2008 $5.4 $5.4 n/a
2008 to 2009 $3.5 $3.5 n/a
2009 to 2010 $2.4 $2.4 n/a
2010 to 2011 $7.5 $7.3 n/a
2011 to 2012 $14.5 $14.5 n/a
2012 to 2013 $15.4 $13.5 n/a
2013 to 2014 $15.2 $15.9 n/a
2014 to 2015 $22.9 $18.8 n/a
2015 to 2016 $23.8 $23.6 n/a
2016 to 2017 $31.1 $21.5 n/a
2017 to 2018 $24.7 $23.4 n/a
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $15.5
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $45.0
Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change

2017 to 2018 progress

In 2017 to 2018, RECAP completed the Centre Block Parliament Hill Emergency Power project which entailed increasing power capacity on the Hill in order to properly support the increased power requirements.

Progress was also made on projects currently underway:

  • Parliament Hill Grounds
    • Completed a study to inform future rehabilitation of the Wellington Wall and the Wrought Iron Gates
    • Completed a study which assessed the condition of the West Sector and informed future safety requirements
  • Confederation Building
    • Partially completed the required window repairs and sash rehabilitation
    • Partially completed the required mechanical and electrical upgrades
  • Victoria Building
    • This project is still in its early stages. A recapitalization study is currently underway to identify ways to improve the overall condition of the building
  • New project Wellington Wall
    • Completed a study which assessed options for new lighting along the Wellington Wall
  • New project South Drive Accessibility Improvement
    • This project is still in its early stages. A study is currently underway to identify ways to improve accessibility to the Precinct from Wellington Street to South Drive
Up next

In 2018 to 2019, RECAP will work to complete the Confederation Building Mechanical and Electrical upgrade project as well as continuing to advance other projects. Many projects, such as the Wellington Wall and Wrought Iron Gates project and the West Sector Rehabilitation project, will start implementing the results and solutions determined through studies conducted in previous years. The North Slope Vegetation project, a project to reforest and stabilize the north slope of Parliament Hill, will also begin in 2018 to 2019.

Symbol for sustainability

Did you know
...that Parliament Hill will act as a "test bed" for emerging clean technologies? As part of this commitment to sustainability and greener modes of transportation, PPB has added various electric vehicle charging stations on Parliament Hill grounds and has installed sheltered bike racks for cyclists in the Precinct.

Building Components and Connectivity Program

The Building Components and Connectivity program (BCC) addresses the modernization of campus-wide communications and information-technology (IT) infrastructures. The campus BCC projects include major modifications within the two centralized data centres, as well as interconnected service applications for more than 30 buildings within the Precinct campus. These projects are coordinated and integrated with LTVP construction.

There are also building components and connectivity items included within other large construction projects such as the West Block, the GCC and the Visitor Welcome Centre Phase 1 projects. This year, a significant amount of time and effort was required to advance these buildings toward a state of operational readiness sufficient to begin a phased move in the summer of 2018, including the integration of IT, multi-media and security systems.

  • In the fiscal year 2017 to 2018, BCC expenditures were $14.7 million, a slight decrease over expenditures in the previous fiscal year as shown in Figure 12
  • All BCC projects were on time, on scope and on budget
  • Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the BCC are expected to increase over the coming years with the planned implementation of the next rolling program of work

Figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 - Text description below.
Table equivalent to Figure 12: Long Term Vision and Plan Building Connectivity and Components Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Annual budget Annual expenditures Annual expenditures forecast
Prior fiscal years $6.3 $6.3 n/a
2002 to 2003 $5.2 $5.2 n/a
2003 to 2004 $7.5 $7.5 n/a
2004 to 2005 $7.0 $7.0 n/a
2005 to 2006 $7.9 $7.9 n/a
2006 to 2007 $12.0 $12.0 n/a
2007 to 2008 $3.5 $3.5 n/a
2008 to 2009 $2.2 $2.2 n/a
2009 to 2010 $1.0 $1.0 n/a
2010 to 2011 $5.7 $5.5 n/a
2011 to 2012 $3.4 $3.4 n/a
2012 to 2013 $5.2 $5.0 n/a
2013 to 2014 $15.3 $14.9 n/a
2014 to 2015 $21.2 $19.4 n/a
2015 to 2016 $19.5 $23.1 n/a
2016 to 2017 $17.6 $15.7 n/a
2017 to 2018 $17.6 $14.7 n/a
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $29.3
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $26.1
Note

All projects are for currently approved projects and are subject to change

2017 to 2018 progress

In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, the BCC program fully completed the following projects:

  • trunked radio communications system project—Upgraded the existing radio communication system used by several Parliamentary Partners' security forces and maintenance teams
  • wireless computer networking project—Deployed Wi-Fi capability through the Parliamentary Precinct which has enabled the reception of voice over internet protocol (VoIP)
  • core network infrastructure project—Modernized computer networking in the Precinct, including more fibre optic cables, bandwidth and faster traffic
  • master control distribution upgrade project—Modernized the audio and video broadcast distribution network and master control facilities in buildings to support digital and high definition formats
  • integrated security system upgrade project—Upgraded and expanded the main integrated security system such as card swipes, video cameras and intruder detector signals

The program also significantly advanced work on other projects namely the Community Access Television, South of Wellington Connectivity, Next Generation Network Infrastructure – Telephony, Information Technology Infrastructure Base Buildings Upgrades and Datacentre Risk Mitigation projects.

Up next

In 2018 to 2019, the BCC program will work to complete the first phase of the South of Wellington Connectivity project, and continue advancing the Community Access Television, Next Generation Network Infrastructure - Telephony, Information Technology Infrastructure Base Buildings Upgrades and Datacentre Risk Mitigation projects. Full completion of these projects is anticipated for 2021.

Planning Program

The Planning Program focuses on the development of precinct-wide guidelines, development plans, and enabling studies that guide investment decisions and the prioritization of future projects. This program ensures that all future work in the Precinct aligns with the overarching vision and guiding principles of the LTVP. The planning team provides studies, design guidelines and strategic advice to support the initiation of new projects, and coordinates active projects to ensure they support and contribute to the broader objectives of the LTVP. Once projects have been identified and the preplanning work is complete, projects are transferred to the MCP and RECAP programs for delivery. This year, the Planning Program expanded its scope to partner with the City of Ottawa and the National Capital Commission to undertake work on the future of Sparks Street and Wellington Street.

  • In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, Planning Program expenditures were $9.8 million, a decrease over expenditures in the previous fiscal year as shown in Figure 13
  • All Planning Program projects were on time, on scope, and on budget
  • Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the Planning Program are expected to increase over the coming years with the planned implementation of the next rolling program of work

Figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 - Text description below.
Table equivalent to Figure 13: Long Term Vision and Plan Planning Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Annual budget Annual expenditures Annual expenditures forecast
Prior fiscal years $5.8 $5.8 n/a
2002 to 2003 $1.6 $1.6 n/a
2003 to 2004 $2.4 $2.4 n/a
2004 to 2005 $2.0 $2.0 n/a
2005 to 2006 $2.6 $2.6 n/a
2006 to 2007 $1.1 $1.1 n/a
2007 to 2008 $0.4 $0.4 n/a
2008 to 2009 $1.5 $1.5 n/a
2009 to 2010 $1.8 $1.8 n/a
2010 to 2011 $3.7 $3.7 n/a
2011 to 2012 $4.0 $3.9 n/a
2012 to 2013 $4.4 $3.9 n/a
2013 to 2014 $5.5 $6.1 n/a
2014 to 2015 $12.4 $10.7 n/a
2015 to 2016 $18.1 $13.1 n/a
2016 to 2017 $21.1 $21.4 n/a
2017 to 2018 $9.8 $9.8 n/a
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $10.7
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $13.5
Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

2017 to 2018 progress

In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, the Planning Program launched and completed a number of key initiatives, including:

  • completed an Urban Design and Site Security study to support future security projects planned along Wellington and Sparks streets, between Bank and Elgin streets
  • completed several reports to inform decision making on future projects and support improved conservation of heritage features
  • partnered with the City of Ottawa and the National Capital Commission to support a transportation study for future cycling lanes along Wellington Street
  • collaborated with three National Indigenous Organizations to complete the design and installation of three large scale banners on the façade of 100 Wellington, a new space for Indigenous Peoples
  • launched Phase 2 of the LTVP update

Security Infrastructure Program

  • In fiscal year 2017 to 2018, Security Infrastructure Program expenditures were $91.4 million, a large increase over expenditures from the previous fiscal year as shown in Figure 14. This is due to the implementation of security infrastructure enhancement components of recently completed and current major projects that are within their final stage (e.g. West Block, Visitor Welcome Centre phase 1, Government Conference Centre).
  • All Security Infrastructure Program projects were on time, on scope, and on budget.
  • Looking ahead, total annual expenditures for the Security Infrastructure Program are expected to decrease over the coming years as a result of the completion of existing projects.

Figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018 (in millions of dollars)

Figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets - fiscal year 2017 to 2018 - Text description below.
Table equivalent of Figure 14: Long Term Vision and Plan Security Infrastructure Program cumulative expenditures, forecasts and budgets—fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Fiscal year Annual budget Annual expenditures Annual expenditures forecast
2015 to 2016 $0.0 $0.0 n/a
2016 to 2017 $22.5 $12.6 n/a
2017 to 2018 $91.4 $91.4 n/a
2018 to 2019 n/a n/a $30.6
2019 to 2020 n/a n/a $2.0
Note

All forecasts are for currently approved projects and are subject to change.

Annually and quarterly on-time, on-scope, on-budget results

Public Services and Procurement Canada's 2017 to 2018 Departmental Plan established targets that all Parliamentary Precinct rehabilitation and construction projects greater than $1.0 million be within 95% of their time, budget and scope targets for the fiscal year. As shown in Figure 15, all MCP, RECAP, BCC, and Security Infrastructure projects meet their targets for the fiscal year, illustrating PPB’s solid project management capabilities and continued success in the delivery of capital projects.

Figure 15—Long Term Vision and Plan on-time, on-scope, on budget performance for fiscal year 2017 to 2018
Indicator Target Result
Percentage of Major Capital Program construction projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 95% 100%
Percentage of Recapitalization Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 95% 100%
Percentage of Building Components and Connectivity Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 95% 100%
Percentage of Security Infrastructure Program projects greater than $1 million that are on time, on scope and on budget Greater than or equal to 95% 100%

Note

Planning is not included in this evaluation as the program does not have any capital projects.

Document navigation for "The Long Term Vision and Plan Annual Report 2017 to 2018"

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