Video: Centre Block design walk-through

Watch this video to look at the concept designs for the reimagined Centre Block, including the new Parliament Welcome Centre. Animated visuals are for conceptual purposes only.

Transcript of Centre Block design walk-through

Start of video

[Music plays]

(Text on screen: Public Services and Procurement Canada)

(Text on screen: Some of this footage was recorded prior to the Government of Canada’s physical distancing guidelines. Canadians are encouraged to continue to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines.)

[Wide shot of Parliament Hill with trees on the escarpment.]

[Shot of Centre Block with construction activity in front of the building.]

Canada’s Parliament Building—the Centre Block—is undergoing an impressive transformation.

[Image of archival black and white photo of inside the House of Commons Chamber. Date unknown.]

[Image of a more recent colour photo of inside the House of Commons Chamber. Date unknown.]

[Image of Speaker’s Chair in the House of Commons Chamber.]

[Image of three workers in protective equipment standing on scaffolding and examining decorative ceiling.]

[Image of damage to pipes and walls.]

[Image of damaged stone on exterior of building.]

After more than a century of serving Canada, this heritage masterpiece and symbol of our democracy is receiving a much-needed renewal inside and out.

[Shot of woman in protective equipment using a brush on a mural.]

[Shot of two workers in protective equipment kneeling on a scaffolding and cleaning a large chandelier.]

[Shot of scaffolding inside the House of Commons Chamber.]

It is being preserved, restored and modernized for Parliament and for Canadians for generations to come.

[Shot of workers in protective equipment lowering a large war painting from the wall.]

[Shot of two workers in protective equipment working on a large painting on the ground.]

[Shot of pieces of decorative carved stone laid out on wooden pallets.]

[Shot of a worker’s hand examining an exposed brick wall.]

[Shot of a man in protective equipment touching a computer screen.]

[Shot of computer screen with blueprints of a section of the Centre Block.]

[Shot of orange pylons in Hall of Honour.]

This highly complex undertaking will require the Centre Block to be carefully taken apart and rebuilt so that modern systems, including seismic, information technology and security can be seamlessly integrated into its beautiful heritage fabric.

[Wide of shot of Centre Block and Library of Parliament from across the river.]

[Shot of two people walking outside. The man is walking with a white cane.]

[Overhead shot of the Centre Block and the Library of Parliament.]

The result will be a greener, more accessible and better equipped building to support a modern Parliament.

[Shot of construction vehicles and blasting mats in a large construction pit in front of the Centre Block.]

[Shot of the Centre Block with construction activity in front of the building.]

[Close-up shot of the Peace Tower with a Canadian flag waving next to it.]

[Graphic of the new Parliament Welcome Centre connected to the West, Centre and East Blocks. Each block is highlighted in yellow when script refers to the buildings.]

A new Welcome Centre will act as a secure and accessible front door to Canada’s Parliament and allow Canadians to engage in our parliamentary traditions and democratic processes.

[Animation of early concept design of the Centre Block.]

It will also link the West, Centre and East Blocks into one integrated facility.

(Text on screen: Design concept)

[Animation of the Centennial Flame and Centre Block. There are people in the background on the lawn and path.]

[Animation of the Centre Block and the front lawn. There are people on the lawn and path.]

Let’s take a walk through the reimagined Centre Block, with a look at the concept designs.

The Centennial Flame remains an important focal point on Parliament Hill, where visitors can gather, admire the view and take pictures.

[Animation moves toward the Centre Block with people on the path.]

[Animation from above shows the large front lawn and central path.]

[Animation continues on path moving to left of main stairs. Image of Vaux Wall and entry to Parliament Welcome Centre.]

Visitors follow the central path with a fully restored front lawn, a historic space that Canadians use for celebration, mourning and demonstration. The walkway intuitively takes them to a dignified entrance to enter Canada’s Parliament.

[Animation shows part of the Centre Block and the Vaux wall.]

A fully accessible entry is nestled under the staircase on either side—seamlessly integrated with the original landscape and the historic Vaux wall.

[Animation moves through glass doors and entry nestled under stairs.]

[Animation passes through open glass door and enters white, inviting space.]

[Animation looks down into the Parliament Welcome Centre below with oval shaped stone clad structure in centre.]

A panoramic view of the hall below gives all those entering Parliament an inviting glimpse of the spaciousness of this impressive new facility.

[Animation moves through the security access points with scanners and metal detectors through which visitors pass.]

[Animation shows large windows in an open, inviting space. There are people standing around in the space.]

A secure screening area keeps Parliamentarians and visitors safe while preserving the tradition of an open, accessible Parliament.

[Animation of oval shaped stone clad structure in the centre with a group of people standing in front of it.]

[Animation moves through the open space with people standing around.]

Passing into the main hall, the stone foundation of the Peace Tower and Confederation Hall anchor the space and connect it to the Centre Block.

Within the hall, there are information and education spaces.

[Animation people standing in an open space with light coming through a window.]

The open area is designed to safely accommodate large numbers of visitors including guided tours and school groups. People can gather and explore the opportunities this special place offers for a deeper engagement with Canada’s parliamentary democracy.

[Animation of Peace Tower seen through a skylight.]

Skylights fill the hall with light and allow visitors to catch a stunning view of the Peace Tower.

[Animation of two glass elevators with people standing nearby.]

[Animation moves up to another open area with a brick wall and stained glass windows. People are gathered in this space.]

[Animation of an open space with windows one side and a brick wall with stained glass windows on the other side. People are gathered in the space.]

The curved stone wall of the Peace Tower’s foundation leads to elevators that travel up into the heritage courtyards adjacent to the Senate and House of Commons Chambers.

[Animation of glass roofs looking down into the open spaces.]

[Animation of brick building with glass roofs above. The Peace Tower can been seen through the glass roofs.]

[Animation of open space with brick wall and windows. People are gathered in the space.]

These courtyards were previously unused exterior spaces. Now, with new glass roofs above, they are transformed into light-filled public spaces that are central to making Canada’s Parliament universally accessible and carbon neutral.

[Animation moves through an open door and goes into the public gallery of the House of Commons Chamber.]

[Animation of several people sitting in auditorium-style seating in the public gallery. Members of Parliament are seated in the Chamber below.]

Proceeding up to the mezzanine level leading to the House of Commons public galleries, light filters in through the stained-glass windows of the House of Commons Chamber.

[Animation reveals the decorative elements of the House of Commons Chamber including ornate wood panels, linen canvas ceiling and large chandeliers.]

[Animation pans through the Chamber to reveal more decorative elements and seating in the upper and lower levels of the space.]

[Animation of the House of Commons Chamber with people sitting in upper and lower levels. This view faces the Speaker’s Chair.]

Inside the meticulously restored Chamber, the space has been reconfigured to allow for more accessible seating for the public and parliamentarians.

As Canada’s population grows, there is added flexibility to accommodate more elected representatives as required.

[Shot of an empty Senate Chamber before construction.]

[Shot of chairs and murals in the empty Senate Chamber.]

The Senate Chamber is also being revitalized in a similar way to meet the needs of a modern Parliament.

[Shot of Centre and East Block with construction activity in front of the buildings.]

[Shot of four workers in protective equipment carefully removing linen canvas ceiling panels with a machine.]

[Shot of laser device cleaning exterior bricks.]

[Shot of decorative stone detail of Queen Victoria in the Hall of Honour.]

[Shot of worker in protective equipment lowering a piece of stained glass window.]

[Shot of people standing around the Centennial Flame in front of the Centre Block. Video pans up to the Peace Tower.]

As part of Canada’s largest ever heritage restoration project, this important work will preserve, rejuvenate and celebrate our most iconic building, ensuring it continues to serve Canada and Canadians for another century to come.

(Text on screen: Check us out: facebook.com/PSPC.SPAC, instagram.com/pspc_spac, twitter.com/pspc_spac, youtube.com/PWGSCanada)

(Public Services and Procurement Canada signature)

(Canada Wordmark)

End of video

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