Core responsibilities: Planned results and resources, and key risks—2021 to 2022 Departmental Plan

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This section contains detailed information on the department's planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Purchase of goods and services

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) purchases goods and services on behalf of the Government of Canada (GC).

Planning highlights: Purchase of goods and services

Departmental result: Federal organizations have the products and services they need, when they need them, at the best value.

PSPC is committed to ensuring procurement is well managed and achieves best value for Canadians. The department manages the procurement of approximately $16.6 billion of goods and services annually on behalf of federal departments and agencies, of which approximately 52% goes to Canadian small and medium enterprises.

As Canada's central purchasing agent, PSPC will continue to prioritize its support for the government's response to COVID-19, buying personal protective equipment (PPE), medical equipment, testing equipment and therapeutics on behalf of client departments and agencies. PSPC has secured agreements for a diverse portfolio of COVID-19 vaccines to ensure that every Canadian that wants a vaccine can get one as quickly as possible. Canada received its first shipments of vaccines in December 2020, and deliveries will continue throughout 2021. In addition, the department is procuring other requirements such as mental health services and online COVID-19 tools, as well as accommodations and humanitarian support to individuals having to self-isolate. The department will endeavour to remain agile in responding to clients' evolving needs, while increasingly carrying out competitive procurement processes. In addition, PSPC will continue operating the Essential Services Contingency Reserve which provides PPE, non-medical masks and disinfection products to eligible essential service businesses or organizations, in order to address urgent, short-term needs. As part of its overall procurement strategy, the department will maintain a diversified roster of suppliers where necessary to help mitigate the risks posed by intense global competition and constrained supply chains.

The department intends to continue modernizing procurement and increase value for money in federal purchasing, through a number of key initiatives including the Vendor Performance Management Framework and the sustainment initiative.

In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will continue the phased implementation of a Vendor Performance Management Framework through its incorporation into solicitations and contractual documents. This will better position the Government of Canada to do business with vendors who perform well and provide value to Canadians, thereby strengthening the stewardship and integrity of federal procurement.

The department remains committed to the implementation of the sustainment initiative principles, and is providing procurement professionals with ongoing support in the development of related solutions, including engagement, training, best practices and tools. Under the initiative, tailored contracting approaches for the maintenance and repair of military equipment are developed to ensure that the specific needs of each sustainment project are met.

Over the course of the fiscal year, PSPC will continue to strengthen relationships with stakeholders and other government organizations through forums to discuss procurement principles and tools, and by advancing the Canadian collaborative procurement initiative (CCPI). The CCPI enables provincial and territorial governments, as well as municipalities, academic institutions, schools and hospitals (MASH) and other entities, to use federal procurement tools, and facilitates supplier access to multiple public organizations through one procurement channel. The initiative will onboard additional participating entities and increase the number of available procurement commodities.

The department will continue to focus on key procurements in support of Canada's defence policy: Strong, Secure, Engaged and the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS). PSPC will make key strides in the procurement of advanced fighter jets to replace Canada's CF-18 fleet by evaluating revised proposals and beginning negotiations on an agreement, with the aim of contract award in 2022.

PSPC will also advance a number of significant procurements with the release of formal requests for proposals following extensive industry engagements over the last several years, the:

The department will also continue to take delivery of CH-148 Cyclone maritime helicopters, CC295 fixed-wing search and rescue aircraft, armoured combat support vehicles, and the final 6 interim fighter capability project F/A-18 aircraft.

In support of the NSS, during 2021 to 2022 the department will accept delivery of the second Arctic and offshore patrol ship (AOPS) and shipyards will cut steel on the eighth AOPS and the offshore oceanographic science vessel. In addition, the agreement with the third Canadian shipyard under the NSS is expected to be in place in spring 2021; this shipyard will build 6 program icebreakers for the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG). PSPC continues to prioritize the delivery of ongoing and future major procurement projects to ensure that Canada has an agile, multi-purpose military, a renewed CCG fleet, and that members of the Canadian Armed Forces are well equipped.

Departmental result: Government purchasing is simpler and easy to access, fair and transparent for suppliers.

PSPC is creating a world-class, accessible procurement system to deliver better results for Canadians and make it easier for Canadian companies to do business with the government. During 2021 to 2022, the department will further advance the implementation of its modernized, cloud-based electronic procurement platform, including the release and implementation of additional key functionalities. This platform, which will make procurement simpler and increase opportunities for all suppliers, was launched in 2020 to 2021, and has already been used for select procurements in support of the government's response to COVID-19.

In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will maintain its focus on strengthened procurement data and increased transparency. The department will continue to increase its data gathering, analysis and reporting capabilities, particularly with regard to diverse supplier participation data, and will release additional datasets via ongoing participation in the open contracting data standard initiative, as part of its commitment to open government.

In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will also continue to develop and implement innovative procurement approaches to help federal organizations meet their business needs, including refining and expanding the implementation of the phased-bid compliance process, the competitive dialogue process, as well as agile procurement. The department will develop tools and learning materials based on best practices to advance the use of these new approaches.

The department is aiming to continue the phased implementation of modernized contract clauses during 2021 to 2022, with a standardized contract structure being applied to a large number of PSPC contracts, as part of the contract modernization initiative. In addition, PSPC will pilot new tools in public-private partnership (P3) procurements such as a streamlined project agreement template, and will also implement best practices that have been developed in consultation with industry.

PSPC's Office of Small and Medium Enterprises will advance its service redesign exercise to evaluate and optimize how the office reaches and assists small and medium enterprises, including businesses owned by under-represented groups. New delivery channels will be explored, including the development of new online self-service tools.

Departmental result: Government purchasing supports Canada's economic, environmental, and social policy goals.

PSPC continues to leverage the federal government's considerable buying power through procurement to support economic, environmental and social policy goals, and to generate positive impacts for Canadians.

The department will maintain its commitment to providing greater opportunities for supplier diversity. This will include bolstering its outreach activities to communities that are currently under-represented in federal procurement, as well as continuing to develop and apply lessons learned from current pilot projects. For example, a social procurement pilot is currently underway which supports purchasing from recognized social enterprises whose profits are principally used to fund social programs. In addition, PSPC will launch pilot procurements to open bidding opportunities for Black owned and/or operated businesses. The department continues to work with Indigenous Services Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to develop new procurement approaches to create more opportunities for Indigenous businesses. Following a 2 year pilot, PSPC is developing a standardized toolkit for Indigenous benefits plans to ensure that PSPC's procurement workforce has the tools it needs to implement these plans more broadly.

As part of the Government of Canada's commitment to renew relationships with Indigenous Peoples and advance reconciliation, PSPC will continue to work with client departments and agencies in 2021 to 2022 to increase the scope and value of benefits targeted through Indigenous benefits plans within government procurement opportunities. Indigenous benefits plans consist of employment and training opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and sub-contracting opportunities for Indigenous businesses in local areas. PSPC's procurement offices in the Pacific, Western, Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic regions are at the forefront of this initiative, engaging Indigenous communities that fall within their geographic areas and in accordance with all requirements under specific land claims and agreements.

Work will progress to improve the accessibility of its procurement processes and documents, and will further integrate accessibility standards and criteria into federal procurement. The department will develop key performance indicators to measure the impact of its initiatives, as part of a performance measurement framework for accessible procurement. The department's 2021 study of Small and Medium-sized Enterprise participation in federal procurement will include questions regarding barriers faced by suppliers in the disability community. The survey results will be used to better understand and reduce barriers to accessibility in federal procurement.

In support of its commitments under the National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking, PSPC will revise its code of conduct for procurement to include requirements for vendors with regard to human and labour rights; develop and implement tools to help ensure compliance with PSPC's human and labour rights expectations; and examine long-term approaches to address human trafficking in federal procurement supply chains.

In support of the government's ongoing commitment to improve the environment and the quality of life of Canadians, PSPC will develop more targeted guidance for procurement officers on integrating environmental considerations, for example sustainable plastic and plastic alternatives, into procurement requirements, as well as on effective methods for the procurement of carbon credits. The department will also develop contract language to reduce packaging waste and improve product durability. These actions aim to advance the protection of the environment and support sustainable development through green procurement.

Finally, through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, PSPC and partner departments will continue to generate significant economic benefits across the country, creating or maintaining jobs in the Canadian economy and engaging with small and medium Canadian enterprises by awarding contracts for NSS-related projects where applicable.

Gender-based analysis plus

The department applies the gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) process within the context of procurement policy and tools development. During 2021 to 2022, PSPC will integrate GBA+ more broadly in its procurement-related processes. In addition, the department will identify best practices to support the inclusion of socio-economic outcomes in federal procurement.

Within the context of the electronic procurement solution (EPS) initiative, GBA+ considerations have identified that as transformation takes place, individuals and groups will experience change in different ways based on intersecting factors such as sex, gender, language, age, physical ability, geographic or regional context, duration of service and tenure. The GBA+ elements and potential impacts that have been identified at the pre-implementation stage of EPS will continue to be carefully considered upon implementation of the solution. Additionally, a positive impact is anticipated in the area of accessibility with enhanced technology making procurement processes simpler, clearer, more accessible and less burdensome.

United Nations' 2030 agenda for sustainable development and the United Nations sustainable development goals

PSPC planned activities under its purchase of goods and services core responsibility support Canada's efforts to address the United Nations (UN) 2030 agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). The various initiatives and programs, such as procurement modernization, inclusive procurement strategies, the Accessible Procurement Resource Centre and the integration of sustainable plastic and alternatives contribute towards:

Further information on SDGs is available on the United Nations website.

Key risks

Defence and marine procurement

There is a risk that the inherent complexities of defence and marine procurement, in addition to impacts resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, will present challenges in achieving the timely delivery of Canada's defence policy: Strong, Secure, Engaged and NSS objectives. To mitigate this risk, PSPC is:

Pandemic procurement

Due to intense global competition and constrained supply chains, there is a risk that PSPC may face challenges in continuing to procure critical goods and services needed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. The department is implementing a number of measures to mitigate this risk, including ongoing exploration of long-term contracts with well-established suppliers to ensure stable and predictable access to critical supplies, maintaining a diversified roster of suppliers where necessary, and continuing to support investments in robust domestic capacity. PSPC is also a contributor to the development of enhanced logistical support for the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Procurement modernization

There is a risk that PSPC will not be able to achieve its ongoing procurement modernization goals and initiatives in a timely manner, and to the desired extent. To mitigate this risk, PSPC is continuing to engage with clients, industry and partner federal organizations, and will continue to implement key initiatives such as the electronic procurement solution and the risk-based approach to procurement approvals. In addition, the department will pilot new approaches in areas where they will have the greatest impact and identify opportunities for lessons learned before broader implementation, and support the procurement workforce in adapting to new processes and tools.

Table 1: Purchase of goods and services: Actual results versus departmental result indicators targets for departmental results (3 fiscal years from 2017 to 2018, 2018 to 2019, 2019 to 2020)
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual result 2018 to 2019 actual result 2019 to 2020 actual result
Federal organizations have the products and services they need, when they need them, at the best value. Percentage of overall client satisfaction with PSPC procurement services. At least 80% March 31, 2022 84% 84% Not available (n/a)table 1 note 1
Percentage of original contracts of level 1 (basic) complexity awarded within established timeframes. At least 85% March 31, 2022 82.3% 80.8% 78%
Percentage of original contracts of level 2 (standard) complexity awarded within established timeframes. At least 80% March 31, 2022 76.7% 71.1% 75%
Cost of procurement services per $100 of contract value. At most $1.75 March 31, 2022 $0.58table 1 note 2 $1.65 $1.42
Percentage of dollar value awarded through competitive contracting processes. At least 80% March 31, 2022 80% 84% 71%table 1 note 3
Percentage of contracts awarded through PSPC standing offers and/or supply arrangements. At least 30% March 31, 2022 30% 28% Data will be available in April 2021.table 1 note 4
Percentage of competitive procurement processes versus sole source. At least 80% March 31, 2022 62% 81% 80%
Percentage of complex competitive procurement processes for which at least 2 bids were received (Level 3 to 5). At least 80% March 31, 2022 n/a n/a 72%
Average number of qualified bidders on complex competitive procurement processes. Average of 2.5 March 31, 2022 n/a n/a 3.1
Government purchasing is simpler and easy to access, fair and transparent for suppliers. Percentage of suppliers that rate the purchasing process as simpler and easy to access. At least 80% March 31, 2022 n/a 72% 84%
Percentage of contracts awarded for which a valid complaint was filed. At most 1% March 31, 2022 0.00% 0.07% 0.04%
Percentage of suppliers that rate the purchasing process as fair and transparent. At least 80% March 31, 2022 n/a 56% 82%
Number of agile digital procurements. At least 19table 1 note 5 March 31, 2022 n/a 3 6
Government purchasing supports Canada's economic, environmental, and social policy goals. Percentage of contract value awarded to small and medium businesses. At least 40% March 31, 2022 67% 49% 52%
Percentage of PSPC contracts, standing offers and supply arrangements that include "green" goods and services. At least 45% March 31, 2022 13.5% 40% 43%
Percentage increase in participation to procurement processes by businesses owned by Indigenous peoples. To be determined (TBD)table 1 note 6 March 31, 2022 n/a n/a n/atable 1 note 7
Percentage increase in participation to procurement processes by businesses owned by women. TBDtable 1 note 6 March 31, 2022 n/a n/a n/atable 1 note 8

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

Early in 2019 to 2020, software used in the administration of PSPC's post-contract assessment, which is the data source for this indicator, was replaced resulting in technical issues which prevented use of the survey.

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Table 1 Note 2

In 2017 to 2018, the target was $0.80 as a different methodology was used.

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Table 1 Note 3

In 2019 to 2020, PSPC awarded a small number of high-value non-competitive contracts, which impacted our result for the fiscal year. This includes a $2 billion non-competitive contract to General Dynamics Land Systems—Canada on behalf of the Department of National Defence to procure 360 armoured combat support vehicles. This contract alone accounted for approximately 10% of the total value of PSPC procurement activity in 2019 to 2020.

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Table 1 Note 4

The data supporting this performance indicator is provided by departments after the close of the calendar year.

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Table 1 Note 5

In collaboration with its client departments, PSPC is continuing to increase the number of agile procurements it undertakes, where possible. In 2019 to 2020, the department launched an innovation and agile procurement centre to facilitate this work.

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Table 1 Note 6

A target is expected to be set later in 2021 to 2022.

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Table 1 Note 7

A manual data collection of 2019 to 2020 bid information was conducted. In that year, 11% of bids received from businesses in Canada were from businesses owned by Indigenous peoples. A manual data collection of 2020 to 2021 bid information is underway to allow the department to calculate a percentage increase from the previous year, and determine a baseline result for this indicator.

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Table 1 Note 8

A manual data collection of 2019 to 2020 bid information was conducted. In that year, 16% of bids received from businesses in Canada were from businesses owned by women. A manual data collection of 2020 to 2021 bid information is underway to allow the department to calculate a percentage increase from the previous year, and determine a baseline result for this indicator.

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Additional information on Public Services and Procurement Canada's departmental results indicators is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 2: Purchase of goods and services: 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates versus planned spending (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2021, to 2023 to 2024) (in dollars)
2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
165,373,648 165,373,648 147,238,024 132,106,964

The decrease in net planned spending is mainly due to the reduction in funding requirements following the deployment of the cloud-based EPS, an initiative from budget 2018 that will make purchasing simpler and easier to access.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 3: Purchase of goods and services: Planned full-time equivalents (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2022, to 2023 to 2024)
2021 to 2022
planned full-time equivalents
2022 to 2023
planned full-time equivalents
2023 to 2024
planned full-time equivalents
1,857.00 1,822.00 1,795.00

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's Program Inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Payments and accounting

PSPC collects revenues and issues payments, maintains the financial accounts of Canada, issues Government-wide financial reports, and administers payroll and pension services for the Government of Canada.

Planning highlights: Payments and accounting

Departmental result: Canadians, businesses and organizations receive payments on time and revenues are collected for government services in an efficient manner.

PSPC's responsibilities for payments directly impact Canadian individuals and businesses on a daily basis, and provide the backbone of financial security to millions of Canadians in receipt of pay, pension, and government social benefits payments.

In supporting the Minister as the Receiver General for Canada, PSPC manages the operations of the federal treasury with a yearly cash flow of $2.2 trillion, through the issuance and settlement of more than 325 million payments on behalf of the federal government (of which 67% are for social benefits payments), and the collection of revenues for all government departments and agencies. The Receiver General also maintains the government's central treasury systems and provides monthly government-wide financial statements, and presents the financial position of Canada and audited financial statements annually. For 22 consecutive years, the figures presented in the consolidated annual financial statements have been deemed reliable and received an unmodified audit opinion from the Auditor General of Canada. The Receiver General is a world leader for best practices in government accounting. By investing in projects to move treasury functions away from its reliance on legacy information technology systems and modernize service offerings to our clients and Canadians, PSPC will offer modern solutions to improve payments and revenue collection efficiency.

Departmental result: Members of federal pension plans receive timely and accurate pension payments, benefits and support services to which they are entitled.

As one of Canada's largest pension administrators, PSPC provides services to more than 908,000 active and retired members of 8 different federal public sector pension plans: public service, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Canadian Armed Forces (regular and reservists), members of Parliament, the diplomatic corps, federally appointed judges, and lieutenant governors; and benchmarks against other leading pension administrators in Canada and across the world. The Pension Program also ensures Public Service Pension Plan contributions are accurately remitted to the Public Service Pension Investment Board within prescribed timelines.

In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will continue its efforts to update pension web tools and software to improve the user experience and align with industry proven best practices, identify and replace outdated hardware to ensure no impacts to client service, and improve pay-pension interfaces. PSPC will also develop new plain language retirement packages to increase member education and understanding of their pension and related benefits, and engage clients through a new member satisfaction survey.

Departmental result: In collaboration with government departments, employees receive timely and accurate pay and benefits.

As one of Canada's largest payroll administrators, handling compensation for more than 300,000 government pay accounts while also delivering pay processing services to 220,000 employees, PSPC's ongoing top priority is to ensure that public servants are paid accurately and on time. To this end, PSPC continues efforts to reduce the backlog of unprocessed pay transactions that accumulated following the introduction of the Phoenix pay system in 2016. As of December 2020, the backlog has been reduced by 283,000 transactions (74%) since it peaked in January 2018.

PSPC will continue implementing its backlog reduction strategy, which is expected to eliminate the backlog by 2022. These efforts will be supported by a robust training strategy to expand the knowledge base and skillsets of compensation advisors and by a standardization and streamlining of pay processing processes.

In addition, PSPC will continue to drive continuous improvement and implement innovative strategies. For example, the use of robotic process automations is expected to have positive impacts on productivity and efforts to eliminate the backlog.

In 2021 to 2022, the department will also continue to stabilize the human resources (HR)-to-pay systems by implementing transformative technology enhancements. In addition, further enhancements to the MyGCPay application will allow employees to better understand pay and compensation, thereby helping to increase confidence in the integrity of their pay and pensions.

Updates on progress are provided on a monthly basis in the Public Service Pay Centre dashboard.

Departmental result: Canadians have timely access to reliable information on Canada's finances.

The Receiver General is a world leader for best practices in government accounting. PSPC provides monthly government-wide financial statements, and presents the financial position of Canada and audited financial statements annually. The Receiver General strives to achieve the highest performance standards to maintain the public trust and confidence, and its employees also provide expert advice, guidance and support to departments and agencies on accounting and reporting matters.

PSPC is committed to advancing the government's overall objective to increase transparency, maintain data integrity, and foster innovation, to ensure we meet the evolving needs of our clients, including government departments, key stakeholders, and most importantly, Canadians. In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will explore innovative opportunities and possible partnerships to ensure government-wide financial reports remain a modern, trusted and accessible source of financial data in Canada.

Key risks

Pay stabilization

Given the complexity of existing pay rules, systems and processes, there is a risk that the ongoing stabilization of pay administration for the Government of Canada will be slowed down by internal system or human capacity issues, or by external challenges such as large-scale changes to labour management policies. This risk may impact the timeliness and accuracy of employee pay, the integrity of pension data, and the ability for the department to continue resolving existing pay errors. To mitigate this risk, PSPC has already taken a number of concrete steps. Following a post-implementation review of the pay pod service delivery model, PSPC is continuing to work with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS), departments and agencies to develop and implement new timeliness and accuracy standards for human resources transactions, and has completed the government-wide rollout of MyGCPay, the integrated pay information portal. To further minimize risk, the department continues to develop strategies and methodologies to more effectively review and close cases in the queue, and will ensure proper testing and oversight are applied to the forthcoming pay system software upgrades. As it relates to pension integrity related risks, PSPC continues to work with TBS and Shared Services Canada to ensure pension data requirements are incorporated in the development of future HR-to-pay system solutions.

Table 4: Payments and accounting: Actual results versus departmental result indicator targets for departmental results (3 fiscal years from 2017 to 2018, to 2019 to 2020)
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual result 2018 to 2019 actual result 2019 to 2020 actual result
Canadians, businesses and organizations receive payments on time and revenues are collected for government services in an efficient manner. Percentage of payments issued within established timeframes.table 4 note 1 At least 99% March 31, 2022 99.99% 99.99% 99.99%
Percentage of money paid to Government of Canada that is reconciled within 2 business days. At least 95% March 31, 2022 99.6% 100% 100%
Percentage of payments made instead of property taxes to taxing authorities within established timeframes. At least 95% March 31, 2022 99.7% 99% 99.5%
Members of federal pension plans receive timely and accurate pension payments, benefits and support services to which they are entitled. Percentage of pension payments processed that are accurate and on time. At least 95% March 31, 2022 96.9% 98% 99%
In collaboration with government departments, employees receive timely and accurate pay and benefits. Percentage of pay transactions processed that are accurate and on time. At least 95% March 31, 2022 46% 55% 68%table 4 note 2
Percentage of cases submitted to the Pay Centre on time. At least 65% March 31, 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021
Percentage of cases, promptly submitted to the Pay Centre that have been processed on time. At least 80% March 31, 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021 n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021
Canadians have timely access to reliable information on Canada's finances. The Public Accounts of Canada are posted on the department's website within 24 hours of tabling in the House of Commons. 100% March 31, 2022 100% 100% 100%
Information presented in the consolidated financial statements of the Government of Canada is accurate. At least 99% March 31, 2022 99% 100% 100%

Table 4 Notes

Table 4 Note 1

Established timelines can vary based on contract terms and conditions and applicable legislation.

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Table 4 Note 2

Accountability for pay accuracy and timeliness is shared across the Government of Canada. Two main factors have an impact on this result: the timeliness and accuracy of human resources (HR) transactions submitted by departments and agencies, and the processing of cases in the backlog. Inaccurate or late HR data generates more transactions in the queue and increases risks for errors in pay. During 2019 to 2020, 50% of all HR data entered in Phoenix were received on or prior to the due date (40% the previous year). Significant progress was made nevertheless with regards to the processing of several case types: 99% of disability and 95% of maternity/parental leave were processed on time.

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Additional information on Public Services and Procurement Canada's departmental results indicators is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 5: Payments and accounting: 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates versus planned spending (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 22, to 2023 to 2024) (in dollars)
2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
564,223,848 564,223,848 451,510,069 228,605,504

The decrease in net planned spending is mainly due to the end of incremental funding received to support the stabilization of pay operations and to decrease the backlog of pay issues. Funding will be adjusted should future approvals be received.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 6: Payments and accounting: Planned full-time equivalents (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2022, to 2023 to 2024)
2021 to 2022
planned full-time equivalents
2022 to 2023
planned full-time equivalents
2023 to 2024
planned full-time equivalents
4,748.20 4,722.74 2,514.48table 6 note 1

Table 6 Notes

Table 6 Note 1

Full time equivalents (FTEs) for the Federal Pay Administration Program for fiscal year 2023 to 2024 are to be determined based on future funding approval.

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Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Property and infrastructure

PSPC provides federal employees and parliamentarians with workspace; builds, maintains and manages federal properties and other public works such as bridges and dams; and provides associated services to federal organizations.

Planning highlights: Property and infrastructure

Departmental result: Federal real property and associated services meet the needs of federal government clients, partners and/or parliamentarians, and ensure best value for Canadians.

The pandemic has required the adoption of new ways of working, many of which will shape the workplace of the future. As part of our COVID recovery, PSPC will work with its partners to explore enhanced flexibility in working arrangements for federal public servants. Specifically, PSPC will look to optimize space through workspace modernization (GCworkplace) and governmental co-working (GCcoworking) models. This approach will ensure employees and clients have access to a modern workplace to deliver their mandates as well as the flexibility to work from different locations. It will also allow PSPC to take a more strategic approach to the office portfolio and make investments that can provide best public value for Canadians

The Greening Government Strategy will continue to inform the department's real property plans. Environmental sustainability and other priorities, such as accessibility will be captured in PSPC's 25-year Office Long-Term Plan, which will enable an integrated approach to investment planning and life-cycle management of real property assets.

A key element of PSPC's mandate is to rehabilitate and renew heritage sites in support of sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Ongoing heritage projects include the Lester B. Pearson Building, the Supreme Court of Canada and the West Memorial Building, the Lester B. Pearson project will demonstrate the Government of Canada's leadership on environmental sustainability through the incorporation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards and innovative sustainable solutions. PSPC will also advance the rehabilitation of the iconic Supreme Court of Canada Building, which was built in 1938. In addition to significant work on the Supreme Court of Canada Building, this work will include the rehabilitation and fit-up of the West Memorial Building so that it can serve as interim space for tenants during the project and then long-term office space once the project is complete.

Other signature real property projects include:

These are all multi-year investment projects that will enhance accessibility, sustainability and health and safety while at the same time preserving heritage aspects.

In addition, PSPC is responsible for managing and maintaining 22 engineering assets located across Canada. These assets include key interprovincial bridges and dams, the Alaska Highway, and the Esquimalt Graving Dock, that serve hundreds of thousands of Canadians and support economic activity in their respective communities. They also include the National Capital Area district energy system, which will continue to be modernized as part of efforts to green government operations. Many of these assets are aging and are in need of repair or replacement to address health and safety risks. PSPC will refocus its efforts on the long-term stewardship of engineered assets in its portfolio. A long-term objective is to ensure that all engineered assets are maintained in fair to good condition to provide safe and continued use by Canadians and efficient operations.

PSPC will continue to rejuvenate the Esquimalt Graving Dock with expanded capacity to sustain the federal fleet. The renewed dock will support sustainment for the new classes of vessels acquired by the Navy and the Coast Guard under the NSS and will have the flexibility to support emergency repairs in a timely fashion. It will strengthen the west coast industrial ship repair industry, support small and medium-sized businesses and thousands of skilled trade jobs, restore the harbour to several historical anadromous species, and create thousands of jobs and immediate and long-term economic opportunities for local First Nations.

PSPC will also continue to deliver on its commitment to maintain its existing bridges (Alexandra, Chaudière Crossings, and MacDonald Cartier Bridge) as well as to replace the Alexandra Bridge as it is at the end of its life-cycle. PSPC is working collaboratively with the National Capital Commission to ensure that the work done is consistent with the federal land use design approval process and compliant with Impact Assessment Act requirements.

Long Term Vision and Plan for the Parliamentary Precinct and the Laboratories Canada Strategy

In 2021 to 2022, PSPC will continue to advance the Parliamentary Precinct's Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP), a multi-decade plan for the restoration and modernization of the buildings and grounds on and around Parliament Hill. The LTVP aims to address the health and safety risks in the deteriorated 19th century Parliament Buildings, to modernize and restore Canada's built heritage to be enjoyed by future generations of Canadians. PSPC will increase its focus on sustainability and universal accessibility by placing them at the forefront of the broader transformation of the Parliamentary Precinct into an integrated campus.

PSPC will continue to rehabilitate the Centre Block, one of the largest heritage infrastructure projects in Canadian history. With the schematic design of the program expected to be completed in 2020 to 2021, the department will aim to finalize Centre Block design requirements and begin major construction activities, which include initiating major rehabilitation of the base building and structure, and completing the expanded Parliament Welcome Centre.

PSPC will also work to finalize the strategy for an integrated parliamentary campus by completing the LTVP update. The transformation of the precinct into an integrated campus will begin with the redevelopment of the block bound by Metcalfe, Sparks, O'Connor and Wellington Streets (referred to as block 2). In the year ahead, PSPC will also complete the East Block rehabilitation phase 1 project and pursue pre-planning activities for phase 2 of the project.

Federal science and research is critical to solving increasingly complex national issues and plays a key role in the lives of Canadians. Laboratories Canada is a 25-year strategy, guided by an LTVP that describes an integrated approach to building modern, multipurpose federal science and technology laboratories that will support evidence-based decision-making. PSPC will build new science facilities that will support universal accessibility and environmental sustainability, while also ensuring federal scientists have access to modern scientific equipment, enabling them to better collaborate with partners and achieve science excellence.

In 2021 to 2022, the department will continue advancing phase I of Laboratories Canada projects, which involve the replacement of outdated facilities with new, state of the art science facilities. Specific activities currently include procuring design and construction contracts for the following science hubs: the Cultural Heritage Science Hub (CHS) and the Transportation Safety and Technology Science Hub (TSTS), both in the National Capital Area; and the Atlantic Science Enterprise Centre (ASEC) located in Moncton, New Brunswick.

PSPC will also continue to support Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNA) and Indigenous partners in developing the Indigenous Peoples Space across from Parliament Hill. PSPC will continue to provide essential technical and project planning, as well as delivery support. PSPC will also provide the expertise and support to help CIRNA secure the necessary policy and programming approvals to advance the project.

Prompt payment initiative

On June 21, 2019, the Federal Prompt Payment for Construction Work Act received royal assent as part of the Budget Implementation Act, 2019. The prompt payment regime will provide benefits for contractors and subcontractors who do business with the federal government by improving payment timeliness while facilitating the orderly and timely building of federal construction projects on federal property. To fully implement the prompt payment regime, regulations have to be developed to establish an adjudicator authority (the entity responsible for the designation of adjudicators), select qualified adjudicators (certified individuals who can arbitrate a dispute resolution) and elaborate adjudication timelines. In addition, PSPC will have to amend the standard federal government construction contract to address the new legislation and regulations and incorporate various prompt payment elements. PSPC anticipates to have completed that work by the end of 2021.

Departmental result: Federal infrastructure spending supports Canada's social, economic and environmental priorities.

PSPC will continue to take effective action on climate change in accordance with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and the Government of Canada's Greening Government Strategy by transitioning to net-zero carbon and climate-resilient operations, while also reducing environmental impacts beyond carbon, including on waste, water and biodiversity. PSPC already achieved a 58% reduction of its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, surpassing the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy target of 40% by 2030. PSPC is well positioned to support the Government of Canada (GC) objectives to reduce plastic waste through the Real Property Plastics Action Plan that sets out actions that will be taken through the property and infrastructure program to meet the federal government's plastic reduction targets and goals.

Canada made the reduction of plastic pollution a key aspect of to reach its broader environmental objectives. Growing strong from the momentum generated during the G7 presidency in 2018, the Government of Canada developed zero plastic waste partnership with provincial and territorial counterparts through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. In October, 2020, the Government of Canada announced a ban on 6 harmful single-use plastics by the end of 2021 by amending the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The 6 proposed items are plastic checkout bags, straws, stir sticks, 6-pack rings, cutlery, and food ware made from hard-to-recycle plastics.

Throughout 2021 to 2022, PSPC will continue to leverage the Parliamentary Precinct and Laboratories Canada LTVPs to enhance sustainability, climate resiliency, and advance the deep greening commitment for federal real property and infrastructure assets with the goal of reducing the government's carbon footprint. PSPC has identified sustainability as one of the strategic objectives within the LTVP update for the Parliamentary Precinct. Additionally, sustainability costs, and life cycle benefits, will continue to be incorporated into overall project costs. PSPC will include sustainability targets into every LTVP project, seeking to reach or surpass these targets.

PSPC will continue working with partners on the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) led federal lands initiative (FLI) which makes surplus federal real property available for re-purposing for affordable housing. The FLI was launched in July 2018 with a target of 4,000 new or renovated housing units. In 2020, PSPC contributed 15 properties to the FLI to be assessed by CMHC for suitability for affordable housing, for a total of 75 since the inception of the program in 2018. Over the next 10 years, up to $200 million will be used to subsidize the transfer of federal lands to housing providers to encourage the development of sustainable, accessible, mixed-income, mixed-use developments and communities.

Improve accessibility of federal buildings

PSPC is well placed to demonstrate leadership and support the implementation of the Accessible Canada Act. The purpose of the act is to ensure a Canada without barriers, on or before January 1, 2040, particularly through the identification and removal of barriers, and the prevention of new barriers. As custodian of Real Property Portfolio for the Government of Canada, PSPC is leading the accessible government built environment initiative. The department has launched a 5-year program of technical accessibility building assessments of PSPC's Crown-owned real property portfolio across Canada to identify existing gaps and accessibility improvements required to bring the facilities in compliance with accessibility requirements, and to exceed them where possible.

PSPC will continue to make the Parliamentary Precinct a federal model for universal accessibility (UA) excellence and inclusive design. To support this, PSPC has developed a Universal Accessibility Review and Action Plan, which the department will seek to begin implementing in 2021 to 2022. To support the development of this action plan, PSPC created an Accessibility Advisory Panel, composed of subject-matter experts in UA, to provide direction with regards to accessibility-planning. The action plan will provide a framework to ensure that accessibility considerations are taken into account in the development of all buildings and grounds in the Parliamentary Precinct to ensure equitable access for all visitors and parliamentarians.

The department will also ensure all phase 1 projects for Laboratories Canada maintain universal accessibility at the forefront of design requirements to ensure that the environment is accessible and supportive of diversity and inclusion.

Gender-based analysis plus

PSPC will continue to explore options to provide Indigenous organizations, female business owners and other under-represented groups with greater access to opportunities to participate in real property solicitations. A gender-based assessment is completed for all new real property mechanisms and solutions launched as part of the Real Property Enterprise Sourcing Strategy, which is a roadmap that lays out the vision and foundation to source large-scale real property activities to the private sector and others, while enhancing internal contract management and oversight capabilities. It incorporates opportunities for thousands of small and medium enterprises to participate in performing work in federal buildings through competitive sub-contracting, and provides broader opportunities for participation from under-represented groups, such as women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, visible minorities and others.

United Nations' 2030 Agenda for sustainable development and the United Nations sustainable development goals

PSPC planned activities under its property and infrastructure core responsibility support Canada's efforts to address the UN 2030 agenda and the sustainable development goals (SDGs). The various initiatives and programs, such as GCworkplace, smart buildings, the plan to achieve a carbon neutral portfolio, the rehabilitation of major assets and the transfer of federal lands to housing providers contribute to the following goals:

Further information on SDGs is available on the United Nations website.

Key risks

Property asset integrity and safety

There is a risk that climate change, natural disasters, infrastructure deterioration over time, and human-related events will negatively affect the safety, integrity, and operations of PSPC's real property and infrastructure assets. PSPC has already taken steps to mitigate this risk, such as greening initiatives to lessen environmental impact, and putting in place business continuity planning and emergency management programs. The department will also undertake extensive infrastructure renewal activities, including National Capital Region projects like the Alexandra Bridge replacement. In addition, PSPC will design all rehabilitation and new construction projects to be net zero-carbon ready, integrate climate-resilience in design and building operations, and strengthen national functional direction to incorporate scientific data and become more predictive in threat assessments and emergency planning.

Workplaces of the future

There is a risk that opportunities for PSPC, as the landlord for the Government of Canada, to accelerate the scope and pace of public service workplace modernization (such as the development of GCworkplace) will be lost due to factors such as work delays as well as uncertainty around clients' future accommodation needs. This risk is driven mainly by the pandemic, which has created an uncertain and rapidly evolving environment that will continue to reshape the ways that Canada's public servants work. To mitigate this risk, PSPC continues to engage with unions, employees, partners and tenants to ensure that workplace modernization efforts meet future needs.

As PSPC adapts to this continually changing environment, it is also mitigating risks associated with a majority of its staff working from home. The department is helping its employees to create ergonomic and efficient interim workspaces outside of the traditional office environment, and helping to ensure compliance with evolving occupational health and safety requirements. PSPC has undertaken a one-year pathfinder pilot project in the National Capital Region to study and document how to advance to future ways of working, by testing space reservation, access control and workplace digital technologies and how workspaces are utilized to inform the organization of work. The findings of the pilot will be documented to support other Government of Canada departments conducting their own pathfinder initiatives as well as in support of PSPC's innovations towards a future of work strategy.

Accessibility of federal buildings

There is a risk that PSPC's real property holdings may not be fully accessible given the wide variety of abilities that must be considered, as well the likelihood that some measures required to implement the latest accessibility standards may be deemed unfeasible in some real property assets. To mitigate this risk, PSPC continues leading the implementation of the accessible government built environment initiative, in order to review the built environment and identify enhancements that would allow its real property assets to not only meet but to exceed the latest accessibility standards. The department will also continue consulting with persons with disabilities and other subject matter experts, to identify areas where accessibility and inclusivity could be improved within PSPC's built environment, such as federal buildings and grounds within the Parliamentary Precinct, as well as to better understand the barriers that persons with disabilities face so as to ensure appropriate best practices and lessons learned will inform future workplace designs.

Delivery of large-scale and complex initiatives

There is a risk that project complexities, partner dependencies, and pandemic-related work and supply delays will affect the effective and efficient delivery of major PSPC initiatives, including the rehabilitation of the Parliamentary Precinct and federal science facilities. In response, PSPC is utilizing built-in risk management processes with a strong focus on schedules and budgets; designing contracts with built-in flexibility developing and implementing client onboarding strategies; and working with industry partners including the Public Health Agency of Canada to ensure the safe and continuous operation of worksites. In addition, the department is establishing governance models based on engagement, collaboration, co-development and multi-project alignment utilizing a portfolio lens.

Predictable capital funding

There is a risk that PSPC's implementation of a predictable capital funding model will disrupt the delivery of the department's infrastructure programs, and will impact the timely and strategic fund allocation needed to ensure a healthy asset portfolio. This capital funding model provides PSPC with secured funding over a 20 year period, to be used to acquire and maintain capital assets such as buildings, bridges and federal labs, and to further enhance long-term planning.

This risk is influenced by factors such as limited experience with this new funding model, and a need for more closely aligned enterprise resource planning processes. PSPC has established a dedicated project office to manage the transition to the new funding model and support the mitigation of its associated risks. The project office will manage a number of initiatives over the coming years to design new processes and tools, and train staff.

Table 7: Property and infrastructure: Actual results versus departmental result indicator targets for departmental results (3 fiscal years from 2017 to 2018, to 2019 to 2020)
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual result 2018 to 2019 actual result 2019 to 2020 actual result
Federal real property and associated services meet the needs of federal government clients, partners and/or parliamentarians and ensure best value for Canadians. Percentage of Crown-owned buildings that are in fair or better condition. At least 53% March 31, 2022 n/a 53% 62%table 7 note 1
Percentage of Crown-owned heritage buildings that are in fair or better condition. At least 53% March 31, 2022 n/a n/a 47%table 7 note 2
Percentage of PSPC-managed office space that is modernized each year to meet the current Government of Canada workplace fit-up standards known as the GCworkplace approach. At least 4% March 31, 2022 3.5% 2.1% 4.5%
Percentage of real property projects that are delivered within scope, on time and on budget. At least 95% March 31, 2022 95% 98% 95%
Percentage of time that PSPC's real property facilities are fully operational. At least 99% March 31, 2022 99.78% 99.78% 99.38%
Operating expenses per square metre of Crown-owned office space. At most $142.41 per m2 March 31, 2022 n/a $142.41 per m2 $132.66 per m2

Federal infrastructure spending supports Canada's social, economic, and environmental priorities.

Percentage of PSPC Crown-owned and lease purchase assets assessed against the 2018 Canadian Standards Association standard for accessibility (CSA B651-2018) TBDtable 7 note 3 March 31, 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022
Total compliance score of PSPC owned and lease purchase buildings assessed against the 2018 Canadian Standards Association standard for accessibility (CSA B651-2018). TBDtable 7 note 4 March 31, 2022 76% n/a n/atable 7 note 5
Percentage of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in PSPC Crown-owned building portfolio, excluding housing. At least 40% March 31, 2025 54%table 7 note 6 54.3% 58.1%table 7 note 7

Table 7 Notes

Table 7 Note 1

The 2019 to 2020 result was not available in time for publication in the 2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report. The result is significantly better than the targeted 53% due to a system cleanup initiative as well as some major recapitalizing work done for certain assets in PSPC's portfolio (National Capital Area [NCA] and Toronto area).

Return to table 7 note 1 referrer

Table 7 Note 2

The 2019 to 2020 result was not available in time for publication in the 2019 to 2020 Departmental Results Report. The result is below the target due to improvements in the methodology for more accurate and representative assessment of the condition of heritage assets.

Return to table 7 note 2 referrer

Table 7 Note 3

A target is expected to be set in 2022 to 2023, once a baseline has been established in 2021 to 2022.

Return to table 7 note 3 referrer

Table 7 Note 4

The 2018 Canadian Standards Association standard for accessibility (CSA-B651-2018) was issued in 2018, and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Accessibility Standard for Real Property was updated in 2019. It is too early to establish a target in light of the fact that PSPC has committed to conduct assessments over the next 5 years in order to establish a benchmark.

Return to table 7 note 4 referrer

Table 7 Note 5

This indicator and its methodology were being reviewed and, as such, a result for 2019 to 2020 was not available.

Return to table 7 note 5 referrer

Table 7 Note 6

The target for this indicator is 40% by 2025 and 90% by 2050.

Return to table 7 note 6 referrer

Table 7 Note 7

In supporting the overarching goals established as part of the Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, PSPC has already achieved a 58.1% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, surpassing the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy target of 40% by 2030. This represents the sum of energy efficiency/GHG initiatives in PSPC's Crown-owned portfolio, decarbonisation of electricity grids across the country and procurement of renewable energy certificates.

Return to table 7 note 7 referrer

Additional information on Public Services and Procurement Canada's departmental results indicators is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 8: Property and infrastructure: 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates versus planned spending (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 22, to 2023 to 2024) (in dollars)
2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
3,244,445,160 3,244,445,160 3,298,786,358 2,607,869,222

The net decrease in planned spending reflects the department's current funding approval to deliver on its infrastructure projects which includes the rehabilitation and modernization of Canada's Parliamentary Precinct, the retrofit of federal office buildings and the modernization of scientific laboratories supported by the Laboratories Canada initiative. Funding will be adjusted should future approvals be received.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's Program Inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 9: Property and infrastructure: Planned full-time equivalents (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2022, to 2023 to 2024)
2021 to 2022
planned full-time equivalents
2022 to 2023
planned full-time equivalents
2023 to 2024
planned full-time equivalents
4,521.29 4,566.15 4,563.37

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Government-wide support

PSPC provides administrative services and tools to federal organizations that help them deliver programs and services to Canadians.

Planning highlights: Government-wide support

Departmental result: Federal organizations have access to high quality linguistic services and tools.

In order to best support the government in serving Canadians in their official language of choice, the Translation Bureau will further advance the modernization of its tools to provide faster, high quality and cost-effective linguistic services. It will implement its new, secure linguistic services request management platform, called GClingua, and continue to experiment with artificial intelligence solutions to support all of its business lines. In addition, the Translation Bureau is building a robust data strategy, which will provide the foundations for evidence-based decision making for future investments in artificial intelligence and other tools.

With an increase in virtual meetings, there has been a shift towards the use of remote interpretation. The Translation Bureau will collaborate with other government departments and agencies to increase access to remote interpretation for official, Indigenous and foreign languages and video remote interpretation for sign languages while ensuring the health and safety of interpreters.

As a leader within the federal government in the area of sign language interpretation and accessible communications, the Translation Bureau is committed to supporting the implementation of the Accessible Canada Act. As such, it will continue to provide sign language interpretation in American Sign Language (ASL) and langue des signes québéçoise (LSQ) at high-visibility events. Further, the Translation Bureau will improve access to real-time translation with Automated Coding by Text Recognition (ACTR) and post-production closed captioning services for all departments. Moreover, the Translation Bureau will explore additional services to ensure access to information to Canadians who are deaf, deafblind and deafened, and whose primary language of communication is ASL or LSQ.

Departmental result: The government does business with ethical suppliers and ensures that sensitive information is handled appropriately.

PSPC will seek to strengthen the effectiveness of the Integrity Regime to further mitigate the risk of doing business with unethical suppliers. This work will include:

To support the government's efforts against money laundering, PSPC will establish a dedicated team of forensic accountants to support law enforcement's and other government departments' investigative efforts in combatting money laundering and terrorist financing activities in Canada. PSPC will also maintain its participation in a government-wide taskforce to develop intelligence and share knowledge across government for better enforcement outcomes on money laundering and terrorist financing investigations.

The department will develop an engagement strategy for business dispute management services in support of open and transparent government while also supporting the priorities and objectives of PSPC's Acquisitions Program and Real Property Services. PSPC will increase awareness of the services that are available to assist in the timely resolution of business disputes through the economical provision of high-quality alternative dispute resolution processes to avoid costly delays in contract management. Business dispute management services are an integral part of the department's goal to manage its business in a way that demonstrates integrity, accountability and transparency, and adds value for its client departments and agencies, and Canadians.

The department will strengthen the integrity of its procurement activities through the development of an anti-fraud hub that will help ensure a coordinated PSPC response to the department's recently completed fraud risk assessments, and the implementation of leading practices in fraud risk management. PSPC will also continue to enhance its fraud detection and prevention capabilities through the use of data analytics, and by improving the means by which employees and vendors can anonymously report suspicions of fraud and wrongdoing.

In 2021 to 2022 the Contract Security Program (CSP) will introduce a security in procurement template to increase consideration of national security concerns in the procurement process. The program will also advance risk-managed, flexible and timely approaches to security assessments through earlier identification of contract security requirements and greater integration with the procurement lifecycle.

To support the government's ability to procure controlled goods and services from the private sector in a secure and timely manner, the Controlled Goods Program (CGP) will provide services that are increasingly digital. Through the transformation and modernization of processes, the CGP will simplify and expedite the registration and renewal process, increase its ability to detect and address non-compliance, and increase accessibility in training programs. In addition, the CGP will expand outreach activities by developing an online social media presence that will promote registration and compliance with the program, including requirements for government contracts involving controlled goods. These initiatives will enable the government to respond to an evolving external threat environment and develop a more client-focussed delivery approach to safeguarding sensitive and strategic government information and assets.

Departmental result: Federal organizations have the support services and tools they need to deliver their programs to Canadians.

PSPC provides digitization and data capture services, manages successful government information services to support the delivery of media monitoring and analysis, contracts public opinion research and advertising, manages publication.gc.ca, and publishes the Government of Canada's official newspaper, the Canada Gazette. In 2021, PSPC will launch a new function on the Canada Gazette website that will support the government's commitment to a transparent regulatory process and enhance its accountability in regards to regulatory initiatives. The Online Regulatory Consultation System (ORCS) will standardize and simplify the regulatory consultation process by providing a means for Canadians to submit comments securely online and view comments submitted by other stakeholders during consultation periods. The department also offers specialized services, such as the Canadian General Standards Board, GCSurplus and Seized Property Management on behalf of the Government of Canada.

To ensure that PSPC can support demand for the digitization of services which require increased public trust in the information being presented, the department has committed to provision the GC trusted platform (GCTP). The GCTP will employ the appropriate security safeguards to protect data subjected to highly-sophisticated cybersecurity threats, which will allow departments to increase the number of services being provided to the public.

Under TBS' new Policy on Service and Digital, PSPC is responsible for providing common enterprise solutions and services related to electronic document records management systems, case and workflow tracking solutions, and collaboration platforms. Whenever possible, PSPC will continue delivering these services to other government departments in a consolidated and standardized manner leading the enterprise solutions to the cloud environment and on a cost-recovery basis.

Experimentation

In order to enhance its capacity to deliver timely, cost effective and quality services, the Translation Bureau will continue to research and experiment with artificial intelligence and other emerging language technologies to support the work of translators and interpreters, allowing them to focus their expertise on quality, and determine its applicability and future feasibility for integration into the translation workflow. This research includes the review of artificial intelligence applications for translation, remote interpretation, terminology and client service.

Key risks

Protection of information

There is a risk that personal, business and other sensitive information will be compromised or inappropriately disclosed, including by means of cybersecurity breach. To ensure that information is appropriately protected, PSPC conducts annual reviews of applications followed by appropriate safeguard implementation, utilizes Shared Services Canada's Government of Canada secure infrastructure to safely handle and transfer secret information, and has re-established the CGP's Industry Engagement Committee. To further mitigate risk, the department will implement and report on safeguards detailed in the 3-year Departmental Security Plan, review elements of contractor program requirements, and implement a cybersecurity management action plan to increase the reliability of and trust in data used for operations and decision-making.

Given the potential for additional digital security vulnerabilities in the current pandemic-impacted work environment, PSPC is taking further steps to secure information it manages. These steps include prioritizing the storage of data in Canada, such as those generated by Teams and other Microsoft 365 applications used across the department, and will also entail implementing additional cybersecurity measures, such as unauthorized access detection controls, vulnerability testing and management, and impact assessment tools for business-critical applications.

Fraud and other wrongdoing

There is a risk that PSPC, as a steward of public resources, will be impacted by threats of fraud, collusion and other forms of wrongdoing. As part of ongoing efforts to protect PSPC's operations from such threats, as well as those of the government as a whole, the department has completed a comprehensive departmental fraud risk assessment process. Through the application of a multifaceted fraud risk management framework, each of PSPC's business lines is enhancing policies, procedures and internal controls that contribute to mitigating the risk of fraud according to unique areas of responsibility. PSPC will further mitigate departmental fraud risk by establishing a departmental anti-fraud body, which will oversee and coordinate further implementation of the framework to ensure collaboration around, and integration of, fraud risk mitigation activities across all business lines.

Table 10: Government-wide support: Actual results versus departmental result indicator targets for departmental results (3 fiscal years from 2017 to 2018, to 2019 to 2020)
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual result 2018 to 2019 actual result 2019 to 2020 actual result

Federal organizations have access to high quality linguistic services and tools.

Percentage of linguistic services that comply with established quality standards. At least 85% March 31, 2022 n/a 87.3% n/a—New indicator as of 2020 to 2021
Percentage of overall client satisfaction with the Translation Bureau's language tools and services. At least 90% March 31, 2022 n/a 85.6% 87.8%table 10 note 1

The government does business with ethical suppliers and ensures that sensitive information is handled appropriately.

Percentage of business integrity verification requests answered within the 4-hour client service standard. At least 80% March 31, 2022 99% 99% 99%
Percentage of security screenings processed within 7 business days for contractors and sub-contractors requiring access to protected information. At least 85% March 31, 2022 96% 97% 98%

Federal organizations have the support services and tools they need to deliver their programs to Canadians.

Percentage of overall client satisfaction with PSPC support services and tools. At least 87% March 31, 2022 90% n/a n/atable 10 note 2
Percentage of PSPC service standards met. At least 87% March 31, 2022 82% 74% 73%

Table 10 Notes

Table 10 Note 1

Due to COVID-19, the second half of the annual evaluation for 2019 to 2020 was cancelled. Consequently, only mid-year results are available for the 2019 to 2020 fiscal year.

Return to table 10 note 1 referrer

Table 10 Note 2

Client measurement practices were changed in 2018 to 2019. Data for that year was then unavailable, making it impossible to provide a result in the 2018 to 2019 Departmental Results Report (DRR) as well as in the 2019 to 2020 DRR. The department does not have the ability to continue reporting client satisfaction based on its initial methodology. PSPC will be working in partnership with clients to develop sound methodology and report on results.

Return to table 10 note 2 referrer

Additional information on Public Services and Procurement Canada's departmental results indicators is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 11: Government-wide support: 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates versus planned spending (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 22, to 2023 to 2024) (in dollars)
2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
157,928,212 157,928,212 141,388,957 129,768,766

The decrease in net planned spending is mainly due to the completion of development costs for the Industrial security systems transformation project, the end of incremental funding for the Controlled Goods Program as well as the end of an information management licensing agreement. The decrease is also due to efficiency savings in linguistic services resulting from streamlined processes and new technologies such as GClingua, the new request management and neural machine translation system.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 12: Government-wide support: Planned full-time equivalents (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2022, to 2023 to 2024)
2021 to 2022
planned full-time equivalents
2022 to 2023
planned full-time equivalents
2023 to 2024
planned full-time equivalents
2,622.12 2,599.30 2,603.39

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's Program Inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Procurement Ombudsman

The Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) operates at arm's-length from federal organizations. It is legislated to review the procurement practices of federal organizations, review complaints from Canadian suppliers, and provide dispute resolution services.

Planning highlights: Procurement Ombudsman

Departmental result: Raise awareness of procurement issues and exchange information.

In 2021 to 2022, OPO will continue to exchange information and raise awareness of procurement issues by engaging Canadian suppliers and federal organizations to learn about procurement-related challenges and opportunities, and to inform them about OPO services. OPO will track and report on trends and developments in federal procurement.

Departmental result: Procurement Related Issues are addressed through alternative dispute resolution.

As per OPO's motto "we are here to help", the office will continue to offer low-cost dispute resolution services to suppliers and federal organizations when disputes arise during the performance of a contract. OPO's certified mediators seek to resolve procurement-related issues and disputes as quickly and informally as possible by re-establishing lines of communication between suppliers and federal officials. When issues cannot be resolved informally, OPO offers mediation services to help the parties to a contract reach a settlement.

Departmental result: Procurement related issues are addressed through the review of complaints and federal procurement practices.

In 2021 to 2022, OPO will address procurement-related issues by reviewing certain supplier complaints with respect to the award of federal contracts for goods below $26,400 and services below $105,700. It will also review supplier complaints regarding the administration of federal contracts, regardless of dollar value and the procurement practices of federal organizations to assess their fairness, openness and transparency. The reviews will be published and will help to develop recommendations for improvement.

Key risks

In order to mitigate possible risks to its mandate, OPO will recruit and train a skilled and multidisciplinary workforce able to deliver high quality services and products. It will also remain abreast of current trends, developments and initiatives in federal procurement to maximize the quality and value of OPO's recommendations and outputs.

OPO will collaborate extensively with federal procurement stakeholders to ensure it takes into consideration the impacts of its actions and remains focused on the needs of those it serves.

Table 13: Procurement Ombudsman: Actual results versus departmental result indicator targets for departmental results (3 fiscal years from 2017 to 2018, to 2019 to 2020)
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017 to 2018 actual result 2018 to 2019 actual result 2019 to 2020 actual result

Raise awareness of procurement issues and exchange of information.

Number of awareness-building activities per year with Canadian suppliers, primarily small and medium-sized businesses, federal officials and other stakeholders. At least 48table 13 note 1 March 31, 2022 63 79 87table 13 note 2
Number of provinces/territories where outreach activities are held. At least 6 March 31, 2022 5 8 9
Year-over-year percentage increase of new visits to OPO's website TBDtable 13 note 3 March 31, 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022 n/a—New indicator as of 2021 to 2022
Procurement-related issues are addressed through alternative dispute resolution. Percentage of alternative dispute resolution processes that result in settlement agreements agreed to by both parties. At least 90% March 31, 2022 100% n/atable 13 note 4 100%

Procurement-related issues are addressed through the review of complaints and federal procurement practices.

Percentage of supplier complaint reviews completed within 120 working days as per legislative requirements. 100% March 31, 2022 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of recommendations made by the Ombudsman acted upon by federal organizations. 100% March 31, 2022 100% 100% 100%

Table 13 Notes

Table 13 Note 1

An increase in the target is due to a clearer understanding of hosting online awareness-building activities.

Return to table 13 note 1 referrer

Table 13 Note 2

As a direct result of OPO's efforts to raise awareness of procurement issues and exchange of information on a nation-wide scale, OPO revamped its outreach strategy to maximise the number of educational events held per year with small and medium-sized businesses and federal officials across Canada. For this reason, yearly results exceeded the set target exponentially.

Return to table 13 note 2 referrer

Table 13 Note 3

OPO expects to set a target in 2022 to 2023, once a baseline has been established in 2021 to 2022.

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Table 13 Note 4

In 2018 to 2019, OPO received 4 requests for formal alternative dispute resolution (ADR) services. Two of the requests met the requirements set out in the regulations, and ADR processes were launched. One of the ADR requests was resolved between the supplier and federal organization prior to the start of a formal process and the other continued into 2019 to 2020. OPO also provided ADR services on 2 cases started the previous year.

Return to table 13 note 4 referrer

Additional information on Public Services and Procurement Canada's departmental results indicators is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 14: Procurement Ombudsman: 2021 to 2022 Main Estimates versus planned spending (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 22, to 2023 to 2024) (in dollars)
2021 to 2022 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021 to 2022 planned spending 2022 to 2023 planned spending 2023 to 2024 planned spending
4,211,647 4,211,647 4,214,453 4,214,463

There is no significant variance in the net planned spending.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's program inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

Table 15: Procurement Ombudsman: Planned full-time equivalents (3 fiscal years from 2021 to 2022, to 2023 to 2024)
2021 to 2022
planned full-time equivalents
2022 to 2023
planned full-time equivalents
2023 to 2024
planned full-time equivalents
21.17 21.17 21.17

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Services and Procurement Canada's Program Inventory is available in the Government of Canada InfoBase.

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