Future Aircrew Training Program

The Department of National Defence must maintain a multi-purpose, combat capable air force to meet the objectives of Strong, Secure, Engaged.

Through an open and transparent competition, the Government of Canada is taking the necessary steps to renew its existing aircrew training services. Future aircrew training services will include classroom instruction, simulator and flight training, as well as numerous on-site support activities.

The future program will include delivery of pilot training, as well as aircrew training for air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators currently being performed in-house by the Royal Canadian Air Force.

The Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy will be applied to this procurement, requiring the winning supplier to make investments in Canada equal to the value of the contract. The objective of the policy is to maximize opportunities for Canadian companies, support innovation through research and development, and grow export opportunities from Canada. Additionally, this procurement will leverage the strength of the Canadian industry in areas related to training, simulation and in-service support.

Engagement

This procurement requires extensive engagement with industry. Preliminary consultations began in 2013. In 2016 industry was advised of the new scope of this procurement through a Letter of Interest. Through ongoing engagement, Canada will define its requirements and industry representatives will have an opportunity to provide feedback on items such as procurement approach, schedule, solicitation documents and economic benefits to Canada.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada is involved in this process to ensure Canadian aerospace and defence industries are well-positioned to participate. In addition, the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) and Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (AIAC) will be engaged throughout the process.

On May 2, 2018, the Government held a Future Aircrew Training industry engagement session in Ottawa. You can access the associated agenda (PDF, 130KB) for this industry engagement session on Buyandsell.ca.

The Government of Canada has been engaging with 84 companies that have signed on to participate in this process. Based on information gathered through the industry engagement process, Canada decided to pursue a competitive procurement strategy with a qualification phase.

On November 15, 2018 Canada launched an Invitation to Qualify on Buyandsell.gc.ca to establish a list of qualified suppliers. Companies wishing to proceed to this next phase of formal engagement were required to respond, describing how they meet the basic mandatory requirements.

List of Qualified Suppliers

In December 2018, Canada established a list of Qualified Suppliers that demonstrated their ability to meet Canada’s needs, as defined in the Invitation to Qualify.

The list of Qualified Suppliers includes the following respondents (in alphabetical order):

Only these suppliers will be invited to participate in the next phases of engagement and to submit proposals in the competition.

Evaluation of proposals

Proposals will be rigorously assessed on elements of cost, technical requirements and economic benefits.

The evaluation may also include an assessment of bidders’ impact on Canada’s economic interests. The new assessment, as well as guidelines for its application as an ongoing procurement tool for major projects is being developed through separate consultations.

All Suppliers will be subject to the same evaluation criteria.

Next steps

  • Continue formal engagement with qualified suppliers to refine and finalize the Request for Proposals—fall 2018 to 2019
  • Formal Request for Proposals—to be released in fiscal year 2019 to 2020
  • Anticipated contract award—2021

Frequently asked questions

1. What kind of training services are required?

The Royal Canadian Air Force has a need for ongoing pilot training, as well as training for air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators.

2. What company/companies are providing these services now? When do the contracts expire?

Training services are currently provided through two separate contracts.

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Flying and Training in Canada is provided by CAE Military Aviation Training, through a contract that expires in 2023. The contract includes an additional option year, which could extend the services to 2024.

The Contracted Flying Training and Support services are provided by Allied Wings. The contract will expire in 2027.

3. Are other training services available outside these contracts?

Training for air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators is currently being performed in-house by the Royal Canadian Air Force in Winnipeg.

In the future, these services will be provided by the private sector under the new contract.

4. Where are the training services currently being offered?

The training services are currently being provided at the following locations:

  • 15 Wing Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
  • 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta
  • Southport (formerly known as Canadian Forces Base Portage la Prairie) Manitoba
  • 17 Wing, Winnipeg

5. Has the Government determined where the new training services will be delivered?

Following a review, the Government of Canada has determined the new training services will continue to be provided at the existing locations.

6. Is this new procurement expected to result in the award of several contracts?

The Government of Canada intends to award one contract covering all requirements.

7. Will the Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy apply to this procurement?

The Government’s Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy, including Value Proposition, will be applied to this procurement. This policy requires the winning bidder to make investments in Canada equal to the value of the contract.

The objective of the policy is to maximize opportunities for Canadian companies, support innovation through research and development, and grow Canadian export opportunities.

The Government will engage with Canadian industry to develop a preliminary Value Proposition strategic objective that will support the long-term growth and advancement of Canada’s aerospace and defence sectors, including leading capabilities in training and simulation as well as in-service support. This includes promoting competitiveness and innovation of Canadian industry through investments in research and development, motivating supplier development opportunities, especially for small and medium-sized businesses and new export opportunities from Canada.

This will ensure the Canadian aerospace and defence industries are well-positioned to participate, grow and compete in the global marketplace.

8. What is the value of the expected contract?

The potential value of the contracts has yet to be determined.

The current training program is delivered through two services contracts.

The first is a $3.8 billion, 25-year contract for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Flying Training in Canada (NFTC).

The second is a $1.8 billion, 22-year contract for the Contracted Flying Training and Support (CFTS).

In addition, training for air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators, which is currently performed in-house by the Royal Canadian Air Force in Winnipeg, will be included as part of the future aircrew training procurement.

9. Will this new contract include infrastructure and maintenance services?

Canada will include maintenance and infrastructure services as part of the contract.

10. What is the expected contract period?

The Contract period is expected to be at least 20 years.

This approach will be reviewed and defined through the supplier engagement.

11. Should there be a delay in procuring the replacement services, will the government extend the existing contracts?

The Government of Canada has a responsibility to ensure that the women and men of the Royal Canadian Air Force continue to have access to these services to deliver their missions.

Should delays in the new procurement extend beyond 2023, the government would examine possible solutions.

12. Will the new assessment to determine a potential bidder’s impact on Canada’s economic interests apply to this project?

The new assessment, as well as the guidelines for its application as an ongoing procurement tool, is being developed.

More detail around the assessment’s applicability will be made available in the coming months.

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Date modified:
2019-01-14