Shipbuilding projects to equip the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard

Under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, we formed partnerships with two Canadian shipyards to renew Canada’s federal fleet of vessels. Learn about current projects to build large and small combat and non-combat vessels. Consult the status of projects to repair, refit, maintain and dispose of vessels and to explore interim solutions to meet current needs.

On this page

Large vessels

To build Canada’s large vessels fleet, we established long-term strategic relationships with two Canadian shipyards:

Combat vessels

Non-combat vessels

Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships

These vessels will:

  • conduct armed sea-borne surveillance in Canada's waters, including in the Arctic
  • enforce Canadian sovereignty in cooperation with Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) partners and other government departments
  • enhance our ability to assert Canadian sovereignty

Project at a glance

Project status:
Construction in progress
Number of vessels to be built:
5 to 6
Built at:
Irving Shipbuilding Ltd.
Built for:
Royal Canadian Navy
Project budgetFootnote 1:
$3.5 billionFootnote 2
First vessel to be delivered:
Summer 2019

Progress of the project

Construction of the first three vessels are underway.

Irving Shipbuilding Inc. videos: Watch the progress of the Offshore Patrol Ship construction

Year Ahead

  • Launch and delivery of AOPS 1
  • Launch of AOPS 2
  • Beginning of construction of AOPS 4
  • Canada is working with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to explore options for building six ships. A final decision on whether to build five or six Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships will be made later in 2018.

Related links

Canadian Surface Combatant

These vessels will:

  • be capable of meeting multiple threats in both open oceans and complex coastal environments
  • ensure that Canada continues to:
    • monitor and defend its waters
    • contribute significantly to international naval operations
  • replace the Royal Canadian Navy's Iroquois-class destroyers and Halifax-class frigates

1Project at a glance

Project status:
Bid evaluation to select the warship design and design team
Number of vessels to be built:
15
Built at:
Irving Shipbuilding Inc.
Built for:
Royal Canadian Navy
Project budget:
$56 to $60 billion
Start of construction:
Early 2020s

Progress of the project

  • June 2016: Announcement of a streamlined procurement approach designed to deliver vessels more quickly, by competitively selecting an existing warship design.
  • October 2016: Canadian Surface Combatant Request for proposal (RFP) released.
  • June 2017: Optional Compliance Review of draft bids.
  • October 25, 2017: Amendment made to the RFP, including the Evaluation Plan, to simplify the submission requirements and the introduction of a Cure Process to allow bidders to correct deficiencies and demonstrate the full potential of their proposed solution to satisfy Canada’s requirements.
  • November 30, 2017: Three bidders submitted Initial Technical Submissions.
  • December 2017 to May 2018: Evaluation of Initial Technical Submissions.
  • May to July 2018: Cure Period during which all bidders were provided feedback on deficiencies to their submissions.
  • July 11, 2018: RFP amended to add a Financial Cure Process and a Compliance Demonstration Phase, to be used only if all bids are non-compliant.
  • July 20, 2018: All bidders submitted final proposals, including financial bids and cured technical bids.
  • August 13, 2018: Bidders were provided details on the Compliance Demonstration Phase process.
  • October 19, 2018: Preferred bidder identified. Due diligence process underway.

Year Ahead

The competitive procurement process to select the design and the design team is scheduled to be completed in 2018.

Award of Canadian Surface Combatant definition contract.

Latest announcements

Related links

Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels

These vessels will:

  • act as floating laboratories used to perform scientific research and ecosystem-based management
  • contribute to Canada’s stewardship of fishery and ocean resources
  • replace the aging Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Teleost, CCGS Alfred Needler and CCGS W.E. Ricker on Canada's west and east coasts

Project at a glance

Project status:
Construction in progress
Number of vessels to be built:
3
Built at:
Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$687 million
Estimated delivery:
all three vessels by end of 2019

Progress of the project

Construction on all three Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels is underway. In December 2017, a launch ceremony for OFSV 1 was held and the ship has been moved to Victoria to complete construction work and sea trials.

Seaspan Shipyards videos: Watch the progress of the Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel construction.

Year Ahead

Construction progress to continue with estimated delivery of all 3 OFSVs by end 2019.

Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel

This vessel will:

  • be capable of multi-tasking oceanographic, fishery, geological and hydrographic survey missions
  • contribute directly to our understanding of the oceans and the impacts of climate change
  • be outfitted for scientific research on ocean currents and on the seabed
  • replace the CCGS Hudson currently operating on Canada's east coast

Project at a glance

Project status:
Definition phase
Number of vessels to be built:
1
Built at:
Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.
Project budget:
Under review
Build contract to be awarded:
2019
Estimated delivery:
Late 2021 to Early 2022

Progress of the project

In February 2016, Canada awarded the contract for long lead items and material to Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards. This contract enables the shipyard to initiate early discussions with potential suppliers and to purchase the required material and equipment.

Year Ahead

Finalize and award the build contract.

Joint Support Ships

These vessels will:

  • increase the range and endurance of naval task groups
  • this will permit the vessels to remain at sea for long periods of time without needing to return to port for replenishment
  • provide a home base for:
    • helicopter maintenance and operation
    • a limited sealift capability
    • support to operations ashore
  • replace the Royal Canadian Navy's retired Protecteur-class auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels

Project at a glance

Project status:
Design and production engineering phase
Number of vessels to be built:
2
Built at:
Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.
Built for:
Royal Canadian Navy
Project budget:
$3.4 billion
Estimated delivery:
Late 2022 to Early 2023

Progress of the project

The Joint Support Ships are being built by Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards based on the ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) Bonn/Berlin design and will include Canadian modifications. The initial design review work is now complete, and procurement activity has started on competitively selecting the major equipment and systems to be installed in the first ship. Construction of the Royal Canadian Navy’s Joint Support Ships began with an early block construction on June 15, 2018.

Year Ahead

Progress on early block construction and continue in negotiations of the build contract for the two Joint Support Ships.

Latest announcements

Related Links

Polar Icebreaker

This vessel will:

  • replace the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent to become Canada’s largest and most capable icebreaker
    • it will also be among the most powerful conventional icebreakers in the world
  • will significantly enhance on-water capability in the Arctic year-round
  • be able to consistently operate farther north, in more difficult ice conditions and for longer periods than any icebreaker we currently have

Project at a glance

Project status:
Contract design stage (completed)
Number of vessels to be built:
1
Built at:
Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
Under review

Progress of the project

No activities are planned until work on other projects has advanced.

Latest announcements

Small vessels

Small vessels are vessels with less than 1,000 tonnes of displacement. Canadian shipyards other than Irving Shipbuilding Inc. and Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd. can compete for individual projects to build small vessels. This means important work can be spread throughout the shipbuilding sector.

The vessel projects are:

Search and Rescue Lifeboats

These shore-stationed self-righting lifeboats will:

  • provide key search and rescue services, including:
    • conducting searches on water
    • responding to marine distress calls
    • providing assistance to disabled vessels
  • operate up to 100 nautical miles from shore
  • replace the Canadian Coast Guard’s existing Search and Rescue (SAR) vessels

Project at a glance

Project status:
Construction in progress
Number of vessels to be built:
12, with options of up to 4 per contract
Built at:
Chantier Naval Forillon and Hike Metal Products
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$89.2 million
First two vessels delivered:
in late 2017

Channel Survey and Sounding Vessel

These vessels will:

  • replace the two current vessels operational in the St. Lawrence Seaway in the Central and Arctic regions
    • these vessels have been in operation for an average of 37.5 years and are nearing the end of their lifespan
  • provide private and commercial boaters with information about channel bottom conditions and water depth predictions
  • provide the Canadian Coast Guard and other federal institutions the capability to monitor and observe marine and environmental conditions

Project at a glance

Project status:
Construction in progress
Number of vessels to be built:
2
Built at:
Kanter Marine of St. Thomas, ON
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$5 million
First vessel delivered:
End of 2018

Progress of the project

Both vessels under construction.

Next steps

Vessel 1 delivered in July 2018. Vessel 2 is expected to be delivered in September 2018.

Hydrographic Survey Vessels

These vessels will:

  • support the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ hydrographic survey operations in Canada’s three-ocean coastal and internal waters
  • be based in:
    • Burlington, Ontario
    • Mont-Joli, Quebec
    • Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
    • St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Project at a glance

Project status:
Implementation phase
Number of vessels to be built:
7 vessels with trailers with options for 3 more vessels
Built at:
Kanter Marine
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$5.5 million
Delivery:
7 vessels delivered as of June 2017

Progress of the project

The work is completed.

Coastal Research Vessel

This vessel will:

  • support the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Great Lakes Science program through the Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Science, primarily based in Burlington, Ontario
  • be expected to operate throughout the entirety of the Great Lakes in both the offshore and near shore environments, while conducting both daylight and night-time operations between April and December each year
  • tow arrays, trawl and conduct stationary point sampling of aquatic organisms

Project at a glance

Project status:
Implementation phase
Number of vessels to be built:
1 aluminum vessel (11.2 to 11.6 metres) with twin inboard diesel jet engines
Built at:
Kanter Marine
Built for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$1.2 million
Delivery:
Delivered in November 2016

Progress of the project

The work is completed.

Future Projects

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Coastal Patrol Boats

This vessels will:

  • replace the existing aging fleet of three Catamaran vessels currently operating in the Pacific Coast in support of provincial policing
  • operate within 400 nautical miles of their respective home ports, with a crew of four and, with a combined transit and on-station time of seven days at sea without refueling or stores replenishment
  • be certified to Near Coastal Voyage Class II and, be designed and constructed to allow application for Near Coastal Voyage Class I certification
Project at a glance
Project status:
Definition phase
Number of vessels to be built:
3 monohull aluminum vessels (up to 25 metres in length) with twin inboard diesel engines
Built at:
To be determined (TBD)
Built for:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
Project budget:
TBD
First vessel delivered:
TBD
Progress of the project

The project technical requirements are currently being defined.

Naval Large Tug project

The Naval Large Tug Project is intended to replace the Royal Canadian Navy's five civilian-crewed Glen class large tugs and the two Fire class rescue boats. This fleet is currently deployed in both Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) DSockyards Halifax in Nova Scotia (MARLANT) and Esquimalt in British Columbia (MARPAC).

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) provides combat-capable, multipurpose naval forces to support national and international security and humanitarian operations, on behalf of the Department of National Defence (DND). It protects Canada’s interests by: safeguarding our maritime approaches; exercising sovereignty over our waters; protecting our offshore natural resources; assisting search and rescue missions; and supporting international operations to maintain global stability.

Project at a glance
Project status:
Work in progress
Number of vessels to be built:
Four (4) Naval Large Tugs
Built at:
TBD
Built for:
The Department of National Defence (DND)
Project budget:
TBD
First vessel delivered:
TBD
Progress of the project

Request for proposal currently posted on Buy and Sell.

Repair, refit and maintenance projects

Contracts for ship repair, refit and maintenance requirements are competed through publicly announced requests for proposals and invitations to tender. This work has benefitted numerous Canadian shipyards and suppliers across Canada.

Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships and Joint Support Ships in-service support contract

Following an open and competitive process, we announced the award of a contract to provide in-service support, including refit, repair and maintenance and training, for both the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) and Joint Support Ships (JSS) in the summer of 2017. This combined contract approach is referred to as AOPS and JSS In-Service Support (AJISS).

Project at a glance

  • Contract award: June 1, 2017
  • Awarded to: The joint venture of Thales Canada Inc. and Thales Australia Ltd.
  • Vessels to be serviced: Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) and Joint Support Ships (JSS)
  • Contract value: Initial 8 year contract $800 million; Overall 35 year $5.2 billion (estimate)
  • Duration of service contract: The contract includes an initial service period of 8 years, with options to extend services up to 35 years

Progress of the project

The contract was awarded in summer of June 1, 2017. Since that time, the contractor has conducted various industry engagements across Canada to build up its technical support network and promote its new supplier portal for interested companies to register as potential suppliers. In preparation for the delivery of the first AOPS to the east coast, the contractor opened a new regional office in Halifax, Nova Scotia September 10, 2018.

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Haida

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Haida is a Second World War vessel. It is located in Hamilton, Ontario and is designated as a level 1 heritage asset belonging to Parks Canada. This vessel is now a historic site offering guided tours. PSPC continues to provide Parks Canada Procurement services for the maintenance and upkeep of this important Government asset.

Other marine projects

While the National Shipbuilding Strategy is a long-term plan to build vessels in Canada, there will be other marine requirements from time to time. As we identify requirements to support the Canadian Coast Guard, Royal Canadian Navy and the entire federal fleet, we engage with industry in open and transparent processes.

Auxiliary oiler replenishment vessel

On November 30, 2015, after the retirement of the two Royal Canadian Navy replenishment ships the previous year, Canada entered into an at-sea services contract with Federal Fleet Services Inc. (formerly Project Resolve Inc.) to provide the Royal Canadian Navy with an interim at-sea auxiliary oiler replenishment capability, prior to the delivery of the two Joint Support Ships being constructed at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd.

The vessel entered into service on January 29, 2017 for a period of 5 years. The contract with Federal Fleet Services Inc. also provides for an additional up to 5 one-year options periods of service at the discretion of the Government of Canada (GC). The total estimated cost of this project is $667 million, excluding the potential option years.

The conversion work done on the auxiliary oiler replenishment vessel named the M/V Asterix was completed at Chantier Davie Canada Inc.’s facility in Lévis, Quebec and met Transport Canada’s regulations.

Latest announcements

Interim Icebreaker Capacity for Canadian Coast Guard

On August10, 2018, Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Canadian Coast Guard, awarded a $610-million contract to Chantier Davie, of Lévis, Quebec for the acquisition of three icebreakers and work to prepare the first ship for service in the Canadian Coast Guard.The purchase of three medium commercial icebreakers will help to ensure continuity of service for Coast Guard clients and the safe passage of marine traffic through Canada’s waterways.

The first vessel is expected to begin operations in December 2018. The second and third vessels will be converted, refit and available to support Coast Guard programs by the summer of 2019 and the winter of 2019-2020, respectively.

Project at a glance

Project status:
Contract awarded in August 2018
Number of vessels:
3
Refit conducted at:
Chantier Davie, Lévis, QC
Vessels for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$610M

Year Ahead

The first vessel is expected to begin operations in December 2018. The second and third vessels will be converted, refit and available to support Coast Guard programs by the summer of 2019 and the winter of 2019-2020, respectively.

Latest announcements

Related Links

Oceans Protection Plan

On November 7, 2016, the Prime Minister launched a $1.5 billion national Oceans Protection Plan that improves marine safety and responsible shipping, protects Canada's marine environment, and offers new possibilities for Indigenous and coastal communities. This program is a Ministerial priority for Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard, Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. Our department supports the Canadian Coast Guard in their OPP obligations by developing and implementing a departmental framework for the coordination of OPP procurements tendered by PSPC and by leading Canada-wide procurements.

Related links

Emergency Offshore Towing Vessels

These vessels form part of a broader strategy under the Oceans Protection Plan to bolster Canada’s marine safety system. This strategy also includes an in-depth towing needs analysis, equipping the Canadian Coast Guard’s large ship fleet with emergency towing capacity, and an expanded approach to regional response planning.

Project at a glance

Project status:
Contract awarded in August 2018
Number of vessels to be leased:
2
Contract awarded to:
Atlantic Towing Ltd. of Saint John, N.B
Vessels for:
Canadian Coast Guard
Project budget:
$67M

Atlantic Towing Limited of Saint John, New Brunswick, has been awarded a three-year contract worth $67,013,720 (including taxes) for the lease of two emergency offshore towing vessels that will operate in the waters off the coast of British Columbia.

The vessels are capable of towing large commercial ships in distress, such as tankers and container ships, before they get too close to shore. As part of the contract, Atlantic Towing Limited will also provide training in offshore emergency towing to Coast Guard personnel and partners, including Indigenous communities, involved in marine safety.

This contract fulfills an immediate operational need to have vessels available as soon as possible, while the Government of Canada works in partnership with Indigenous communities and local stakeholders to develop a long-term strategy for emergency towing on the West Coast and across Canada.

The contract is for the provision of vessels for the next three years. The two leased vessels will be operated by Atlantic Towing Limited personnel, along with members of the Canadian Coast Guard, off the coast of British Columbia. One will patrol a northern area in Canadian waters between Alaska and the northern tip of Vancouver Island, and the other a southern area including the west side of Vancouver Island and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Both vessels will be on-site in late 2018.

Latest announcements

Date modified: